Electronic journal for philosophy



Yüklə 174,04 Kb.

səhifə1/6
tarix23.11.2017
ölçüsü174,04 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



λ

 



E-LOGOS 

ELECTRONIC JOURNAL FOR PHILOSOPHY 

ISSN 1211-0442                                         6/2009

 

 



Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life 

in Aristippus  

Kristian Urstad 

University of Economics 

Prague 

 

 




K. Urstad 

 

Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life 



 

 



Abstract 

For many of the ancient Greek philosophers, the ethical life was understood to be 

closely tied up with important notions like rational integrity, self-control,  self-

sufficiency, and so on. Because of this, feeling or passion (pathos), and in particular, 



pleasure, was viewed with suspicion. There was a general insistence on drawing up a 

sharp contrast between a life of virtue on the one hand and one of pleasure on the 

other. While virtue was regarded as rational and as integral to advancing one’s well-

being or happiness and safeguarding one’s autonomy, pleasure was viewed as 

largely irrational and as something that usually undermines a life of reason, self-

control  and self-sufficiency. I want to try to show that the hedonist Aristippus of 

Cyrene, a student and contemporary of Socrates, was unique in not drawing up such 

a sharp contrast. Aristippus, I argue, might be seen to be challenging the conception 

of passion and pleasure connected to loss of self-control and hubristic behavior. Not 

only do I try to show that pleasure according to Aristippus is much more 

comprehensive or inclusive than it is usually taken to be, but that a certain kind of 

control and self-possession play an important part in his conception of pleasure and 

in his hedonism as a whole.  

 

 



 

 



K. Urstad 

 

Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life 



 

 



For many of the ancient Greek philosophers, the ethical life was understood to be 

closely tied up with notions like rational integrity, self-control, self-sufficiency, and 

so on. Because of this, feeling or passion (pathos), and in particular, pleasure, was 

viewed with suspicion. There was a general insistence on drawing up a sharp 

contrast between a life of virtue on the one hand and one of pleasure on the other. 

While virtue was regarded as rational and as integral to advancing one’s well-being 

or happiness and safeguarding one’s autonomy, pleasure was viewed as largely 

irrational and as something that usually undermines a life of reason, self-control and 

self-sufficiency.     

I want to try to show that Aristippus of Cyrene, a student and contemporary of 

Socrates, did not draw up such a sharp contrast. This may seem surprising since 

Aristippus is traditionally understood as a sybaritic hedonist, someone  who only 

cares for physical pleasures at the expense of any concern for such ethical notions, 

like self-control and rational integrity. But this traditional interpretation, I will argue, 

is simply not correct. Rather, Aristippus, I claim, might be seen to be challenging the 

conception of passion and pleasure connected to loss of self-control and hubristic 

behavior. Not only do I try to show that pleasure according to Aristippus is much 

more comprehensive or inclusive than it is usually taken to be, but that a certain kind 

of control and self-possession play an important part in his conception of pleasure 

and in his hedonism as a whole.   

I proceed in roughly four stages. First, I argue against that aspect of traditional 

interpretation which has Aristippus tagged as someone upholding exclusively a 

sybaritic view of pleasure. I contend that a careful reading of the testimony reveals 

no such exclusivity on his part. Second, I take a closer look at Aristippus’ intellectual 

context and influences with respect to the notion of pleasure. This supplies us with 

further reason, I argue, to suppose that Aristippus would not have construed 

pleasure so narrowly. Third, I attempt to uncover a more positive account of 

Aristippus’ notion of pleasure. And finally, I speculate on the ethical significance of 

pleasure according to Aristippus.   

Aristippus is viewed, both by ancient and modern commentators, as holding a 

sybaritic view of pleasure, that is to say, one concerned exclusively with the more 

immediate or short-term bodily pleasures, usually associated with appetites for sex, 

food and drink. For instance, Cicero attributes to him, in polemical fashion, the view 

that pleasure is “an agreeable and delightful excitation of the sense, which is what 

even dumb cattle, if they could speak, would call pleasure” (De fin. II 18); and later in 

the same work he says that Aristippus held that we are here “like some dull, half-




K. Urstad 

 

Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life 



 

 



witted sheep, in order to feed and enjoy the pleasure of procreation” (II 40).

1

 Lucian 



dubs him the ‘sophist of pleasant sensations’, and it is clear he has primarily bodily 

pleasure in mind since his (Aristippus’) drunken condition prohibits him from 

actually speaking in Lucian’s sketch (Vit. auct. 12). A modern example is Guthrie, 

who claims that Aristippus “was a hedonist in the vulgar sense of indulging 

excessively in food, drink and sex…” and that his “hedonism was of the strictest sort. 

Pleasure was confined to bodily pleasure” (1971, 143, 174). And the list is not 

insubstantial that goes on in this vein.

2

First, though one must not neglect Aristippus’ more profligate tendencies, since they 



are indisputably there, as, among others, the reports of both Xenophon

  

Let me first begin with this often made claim about sybariticism. Is there really 



strong evidence for this view of Aristippus? The answer here must be, not especially, 

or at least, not exclusively so. I start with three preliminary but important points 

which must be considered.  

3

  and 



Athenaeus

4

 clearly point out, such reports should be taken with a large grain of salt. 



This is because the ‘voluptuous and pleasure-loving’

5

Second, we should see, in part, some of Aristippus’ apparent levity and crudity as 



representing a Socratic trait, namely, his playfulness and ironical mode of 

presentation. Like Socrates, Aristippus, through his own brand of shock tactics and 

witticisms, wanted to rouse those who hear him to thought.

  position of Aristippus no 

doubt inspired much contempt from contemporaries and various later thinkers (for 

instance, according to Diogenes Laertius, Xenophon, Theodorus and Plato are all said 

to have abused Aristippus because of his position on pleasure –II 65). And such 

contempt most likely expressed itself in exaggerated and scandalizing stories about 

Aristippus, where these stories were then in turn used to provide one-sided 

illustrations of his position on pleasure. That hedonists, even those of the most subtle 

and sophisticated variety, often get tarred with the brush of excess and sensualism, 

is, after all, not all that surprising. We need only be reminded of Epicurus who was 

slandered by his contemporaries (DL 10 4-8).  

6

                                                



1

 Earlier, in Book I, Cicero states clearly that it is physical enjoyment (corpore voluptatem) Aristippus is after 

(23).  

2

 To mention but a few: Gosling and Taylor, 1982, 40; Rankin, 1983, 200; Kahn, 1996, 18.  



3

  Xenophon reports that Socrates is aware that Aristippus is intemperate regarding “eating and drinking and 

sexual indulgence” (Mem. 2. 1. 1).      

4

 Athenaeus claims that Aristippus “…lived amid every form of luxury and expensive indulgence in perfumes, 



clothes and women.” (Deip. XII 544b) 

5

 Quoted from Aristocles, Preparation for the Gospel, XIV. 18. 31. 



6

 See Rankin, 1983, 199.  

  Thus we ought not 

always take all the scandalizing and profligate things Aristippus says or does as 

entirely and accurately representing the underlying view or theory on his part.  





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə