Filial Piety and Good Leadership



Yüklə 337,97 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix07.11.2018
ölçüsü337,97 Kb.
#78262


E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



1

                              Filial Piety and Good Leadership 

 

                                       Prof. Dr. Patrick Kim Cheng Low                                                   



                            Deputy Dean, Postgraduate Studies and Research 

                                    Sik-Liong Ang, MBA, PhD Candidate                                                        

                                    University of Brunei Darussalam, Brunei 

 

Abstract

There  is  a  Chinese  saying  that  goes,  “百  善  孝  为  先”  Hanyu  Pinyin:  bǎi  shàn  xiào  wéi  xiān 

meaning  among  all  things,  filial  piety  (respect)  is  the  utmost  virtue.  All  the  positive  social 

relationships to attain peace and harmony in a society must start with the practice of filial piety or 

respect  at  home,  perhaps  similar  to  the  English  proverb  “charity  begins  at  home”.  Here  in  this 

leadership paper, the authors examine and interpret the concept of Confucianism that the Chinese 

believe  and  practice  for  many  centuries,  and  the  paper  is  oriented  towards  attaining  good 

leadership  by  practicing  the  value  of  filial  piety.  The  authors  also  explain  the  ways  or  how  the 

ancient  Chinese  studied  and  followed  the  traditional  ways  of  loving  one’s  parents  and  offering 

them  respect  which  is  the  fountainhead  or  starting  point  from  which  other  forms 

of filial piety flows. Using various examples and analogies, the authors indicate, draw parallels as 

well as examine and highlight the key lessons drawn from being filial towards one’s parents and 

simultaneously (or later on) being loyal towards one’s nation .  

 

Key words: Filial Piety, Confucianism, Leadership, Confucian Values; loyalty to nation.

 

 

Introduction 

In Confucianism, when an individual embraces and practices the value of filial piety, (s)he is, in 

fact,  cultivating  and  developing  him(herself)  to  become  a  good  leader  (君子,  Hanyu  Pinyin

jūnzǐ ).  Only  with  the  good  characteristic  and  behavior  of  jūnzǐ  that  one  can  lead  people  and 

encourage people to carry out a proper lifestyle and livelihood. When people are kind and helpful 

to  each  other,  this  would  create  good  relationships  within  the  society.  This  friendly  and 



E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



2

conducive  environment  would  further  influence  and  encourage  more  and  more  people  to  attain 

similar  good  virtues  such  as  filial  piety;  and  if  this  continues  to  be  so,  there  would  be  fewer 

frictions  or  less  conflicts  in  relationships,  and  thus  this  would  create  positive  energies  in  group 

dynamics and teams. All would then be working towards a peaceful and harmonious society, and 

since  everybody  behaves  in  a  socially  responsible  way,  the  people  in  business  and  in  the 

government  when  relating  with  their  stakeholders  (community  and  society)  would  be  able  to 

prosper  in  doing  their  daily  living  and  in  executing  their  social  responsibilities.  Furthermore, 

there would be fewer problems in the community dealings and business transactions in the wider 

society and country. In Confucius’ mind, a good leader has an obligation to cultivate and improve 

him(her)self morally; (s)he demonstrates filial piety and loyalty; and (s)he acts with benevolence 

towards  his  or  her  fellow  people.  Therefore,  good  leadership  requires  correct  moral  and  ethical 

behavior  of  both  the  individual  and  the  government.  It  underscores  the  importance  of  social 

relationships, solidarity, justice and sincerity. In short, it is aimed at creating peace and harmony 

in  a  society  with  social  responsibility.  Interestingly,  Aung  San  Suu  Kyi  who  received  the  1991 

Nobel Peace Prize for her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights, said repeatedly, 

“Loyalty  to  principles  is  more  important  than  loyalty  to  individuals.”  (Michael,  1991.  pp.  xxvi 

Introduction). This is uncanny, similar to what Yǒu Zǐ

 

(有子, a disciple of Confucius) said, “It is 



rare for a man who is filial towards his parents and respectful to his elder brothers to go against 

his superiors; never has there been a person who does not like to go against his superiors and at 

the  same  time  likes  to  rebel  or  cause  trouble.  A  gentleman  devotes  himself  to  basics  or  core 

values. Once the core values or basics are established, the principles and actions of government 

and behaviour will grow from there. The basics (principles) are to be filial toward one’s parents 

and respectful to one’s elder brothers!” (Analects Of Confucius, I: 2). Therefore, in this respect, 

to achieve good leadership, the people should, in a way, embrace and be loyal to such principles 

as filial piety. 



 

Purpose & Objectives 

The  paper  seeks  to  explain  the  ways  or  how  the  ancient  Chinese  studied  and  followed  the 

traditional ways of loving one’s parents and offering them  respect which is the fountainhead or 

starting  point  from  which  other  forms  of filial piety flows.  By  using  various  examples  and 

analogies,  the  paper  highlights  the  simple  leadership  lessons  drawn  from  the  wisdom  of 



E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



3

Confucius; and also examines and highlights the key lessons of being filial towards one’s parents 

and simultaneously (or later on) being loyal towards one’s nation. Wherever appropriate, Chinese 

visors and perspectives are added in the discussions.  



 

What Is Filial Piety? 

In general terms, being filial refers to the duties, feelings, or relationships which exist between a 

son  or  daughter  and  his  or  her  parents.  Piety  is  a  strong  religious  belief,  or  behavior  that  is 

religious or  morally  correct.  Filial piety is the virtue of a child  to  his  or her parents  or parental 

figures,  both  living  and  deceased.  Originating  with Confucianism which  was  significantly 

practiced  in  China, it  is  an  essential  element  of  Chinese  culture.  Filial  piety  is  not  a  religious 

concept in the Chinese culture, but it has formed an acceptable part of the way the Chinese relate 

to their parents and ancestors, or elders. In Western cultures, Judaism and Christianity both stress 

on the  importance of  honoring and  respecting one’s parents.  In the authors’  view, filial piety  is 

one of the most basic virtues universally found in diverse cultures throughout human history.  

 

For  Confucians,  the  right  actions  are  indeed  critical  (Low,  2011).  Essentially, filial piety,  the 



basis for the right actions, is one of the correct relationships for which Confucius advocated. Zi 

You  (a  disciple  of  Confucius)  asked  about  being  filial  and  Confucius  said,  “Nowadays,  one  is 

called  a  filial  son  only  because  one  is  able  to  support  one’s  parents.  Actually,  even  dogs  and 

horses are no less able to do this. If one does not treat one’s parents with reverent respect, what is 

then the difference between him and animals?"  (Analects of Confucius, II﹕7).  What Confucius 

meant  is  that  those  who  practice  with  the  value  of  filial  piety  must  include  each  person’s 

responsibility to respect their parents, obey them, take care of them as they age; each person also 

advises  one’s  parents,  and  overall  takes  care  of  them  and  love  them.  Loving  one’s  parents  and 

offering  them  respect  is  the  starting  point  from  which  other  forms  of filial piety flow.  A 

relationship  with  one’s  parents  must  be  based  on  love  and  respect.  The  practice  of  filial  piety 

starts at home with the son doing and practicing loving kindness and respect to the elders. This 

good  behavior  would  then  apply  and  extend  to  the  community  at  large.  There  are  four  other 

relationships, which Confucius expounded, that are of importance and if we do them right, then it 

is  believed  that  the  society  we  live  in  would  attain  peacefulness  and  social  harmony.  They  are 

namely:  




E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



4

1) the relationships between ruler and the ministers.  

2) the relationship between husband and wife. 

3) the relationship between siblings.  

4) the relationship between friends.  

All  these  positive  relationships  of  aiming  to  attain  peace  and  harmony  in  a  society  should  start 

with the practice of filial piety or respect at home. 

 

Figure-1 shows the influence of filial piety on the stability of social relationships. 



 

 

 

The practice of filial piety enables a leader to have the appropriate emotions and inner states as 

well as moving him or her to act in a virtuous way. A virtuous or good leader develops through 

learning  and  practice.  The  road  to  becoming  virtuous  requires  a  leader  to  be  consistently 

motivated  by  moral  goods  in  his  or  her  actions.  After  a  time  of  repeating  such  actions,  (s)he 

acquires good habits leading to good leadership. 

 

What Is Good Leadership?  



E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



5

Leadership,  the  driving  force  of  organizations,  often  plays  an  important  role  in  every  profit  or 

non-profit  organization,  society,  and  nation  (Low,  2010).  Leadership  is  “about  creating  the 

climate  or  culture  where  people  are  inspired  from  the  inside  out”  (Wilson,  2008,  pp.  9;  Low, 

2011a).  Leadership  can  also  be  defined  as  the  process  of  influencing  others  to  facilitate  the 

attainment  of  organizational  relevant  goals  and  this  definition  is  applicable  to  both  formal  and 

informal  leadership  position  in  order  to  exert  leadership  behavior.  (Ivancevich  et  al.,  2008,  pp. 

413).    With  regard  to  good  leadership,  Confucius  said,  “If  the  ruler  acts  properly,  the  common 

people  will  obey  him  without  being  ordered  to;  if  the  ruler  does  not  act  properly,  the  common 

people will not obey him even after  repeated injunctions.” (Analects  of  Confucius XIII:  6); this 

also means that good leaders do act properly such as: they do not impose or seek to force; rather 

they seek to enthuse or inspire. Let alone not being selfish or self-centered, they do not impose 

their will on others; rather, they live  according to core beliefs and principles that  attract others; 

they  initiate  change  because  they  foresee  or  visualize  a  better  way,  and  others  follow  that 

pathway because they believe it is a better avenue (Bacon, 2012: ix; cited in Low, 2011a). In sum, 

Low (2011a) further remarked that ‘when leaders act with values – that is, when they show their 

goodness, values, and positivity – the effects are great, enlarged because leaders serve as vision 

creators,  exemplars  and  sources  of  recognition  and  rewards;  and  good  feelings  or  positive 

emotions also occur among members within the organization’. In the similar manner, leaders who 

practice the value of filial piety would lead well or in other words, attain  good leadership. And 

this does not stop here; continuous efforts are made to improve the leadership ways. 

 

There are six major factors in good leadership by practicing the value of filial piety:  



 

1)

 

Being a Good Leader 

One  must  understand  one’s  potential,  capability;  and  what  one  can  do  and  contribute  to 

the  group/organization/nation.  A  leader  should  know  that  it  is  the  followers  or  other 

people who determines if (s)he is good or successful. If the followers do not trust or show 

lack of respect and confidence in their leader, then they will not be inspired or motivated 

to work for him or her. Therefore, to be a good (successful) leader, an individual should 

convince his or her followers that (s)he is worthy of being a leader for them to follow. In 

this regard, Confucius said that a leader should be upright and act with integrity in order 




E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



6

to  lead  his  people  effectively  and  he  said  this  in  a  very  positive  manner  that  the  leader 

should ‘act properly’ (Analects of Confucius XIII: 6).  

2)

 

Treating Followers/Supporters with Respect 

This is actually linked to the Confucian value of brotherhood, peer-ship and equality (悌



 



Hanyu Pinyin : tì) 

It  is  important  to  have  a  good  understanding  of  one’s  followers/supporters  because 

different  people  require  different  styles  of  leadership.  Take  for  example,  in  an 

organization,  (1)  a  new  recruit  requires  more  guidance  and  supervision  than  an 

experienced  employee.  (2)  An  employee  who  lacks  motivation  requires  a  different 

approach than one with a high degree of motivation. This means that a leader must know 

and understand his or her followers’ human nature, such as culture, needs, emotions, and 

motivation. Obviously, being a gentleman (jūnzǐ), a leader must take care of the interests 

and  needs  of  all  his  followers  and  supporters.  (Low  and  Ang,  2011,  pp.  200).  Leaders 

should also encourage the followers to unleash their hidden potentials/talents and to add 

value  to  the  organizations.  Low  (2010a,  pp.  29)  stressed  that  ‘talent  or  human  capital  is 

the  primary  driver  of  any  successful  company,  better  talents  will  definitely  differentiate 

higher  performance  companies  from  the  rest;  and  talent  management  is  critical  when  it 

comes  to  business excellence  and success.’  In this regard, excellent  leaders have a  good 

number  of  good,  loyal  followers  or  teams.  Such  leaders  grow  their  people  and  achieve 

success  through  tapping  the  strengths  and  gifts  of  their  own  teams,  co-workers  and 

employees. 

 

3)



 

Leading by Ongoing Responsive Relationship 

This concept and practice is actually linked to reciprocity or The Golden Rule (恕, Hanyu 



Pinyin: shù) 

  

One  leads  through  two-ways  of  communication.  Much  of  it  is  non-verbal.  Take  for 



instance, when one sets the example to his or her people and communicates to them that 

(s)he would not ask them to perform anything that (s)he would not be willing to do. This 

obviously means that what and how an individual does or communicates may either build 



E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



7

or  harm  the  relationship  between  the  leader  and  his  (her)  employees.  In  this  respect,  Zi 



Gong, a disciple, once asked Confucius, “Is there a single word that a man can follow and 

practice as his principle of conduct for life?” Confucius replied, “It is, perhaps, the word, 



Shu (恕



恕) or reciprocity. That is ‘not to do unto others what one does not want others to do 

unto  oneself.’”  (Analects  of  Confucius,  XV:  24;  Lin,  1994,  pp.  186).  The  authors  are 

inclined  to  favor  the  Confucian’s  overall  anchor,  the  Golden  Rule,  that  is,  in  a  positive 

way, as a gentleman, “One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself”. 

Applying this principle into the human relationship, this meant that one moves away from 

oneself  and  becomes  less  self-centered,  more  thinking  of  others,  and  in  fact,  more 

altruistic. Good leaders should recognize their responsibilities to the employees and to the 

public  at  large  and  make  decisions  that  reflect  these  responsibilities  in  clear  and 

transparent  ways.  Here,  leaders  can  then  engage  the  people  moving  from  inactive  to 

reactive  to  proactive  and  to  interactive.  The  basic  point  is  that  one  can  argue  that 

leadership cannot avoid communication but has to enter into dialogue, do something, and 

engage  with  the  people–  government  or  non-government  in  an  ongoing  responsive 

relationship.  

 

4)



 

Understanding The Situation/Environment  

All  situations  are  different.  What  an  individual  does  favorably  in  one  situation  may  not 

always  work  in  another.  One  must  study,  analyze  and  use  one’s  judgment  to  decide  the 

best  course  of  action  and  the  leadership  style  needed  for  each  situation.  In  other  words, 

one  must  be  able  to  feel  the  “pulse”  of  the  system/situation/environment  constantly  in 

order  to  apply  the  appropriate  leadership  style.  Take  for  example,  a  leader  may  need  to 

confront an employee for inappropriate behavior, but if the confrontation is either too late 

or too early, too harsh or too weak, then the results may come out to be ineffective.  

 

     5)   Being Ethical 



At  this  juncture,  it  is  critical  to  note  that  “a  leader  gains  moral  grounds  and  attracts  his 

followers through his examples. His actions are louder than words” (Low, 2008, pp. 49). 

 



E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



8

Stressing on the importance of an upright leader, Confucius remarked confidently, “Why 

should  a  leader  have  any  difficulty  in  managing  and  administrating  his  country  if  he  is 

upright?  How  could  a  leader  correct  others  if  he  himself  is  not  upright?”  (Analects  of 



Confucius  XIII:  13).  So,  what  does  he  mean  by  an  upright  leader?  Considering  the 

Confucian socio-political norms for the leader, Confucius suggests that those who want to 

be leaders have to be ethical in having virtuous characters and attitudes based on personal 

cultivation. He urges for harmonious interpersonal relations in social organizations, that is, 

reciprocally obligatory relationship on the  ground of hierarchical  relations.  Furthermore, 

Confucius  remarked,  “The  jūnzǐ (君子

君子

君子

君子,  gentleman  or  person)  understands  what  is  right; 



the petty man understands what will sell.” (Analects of Confucius IV: 16). In other words, 

the gentleman (lady) has the proper virtue and understanding of doing things right. (S)he 

understands  what  is  right  and  what  is  wrong  when  doing  his  or  her  daily  duties  or 

businesses. The petty person, on the other hand, only understands what can make him or 

her rich.  

6)

 

Embracing Peace and Harmony 

This is related to the concept  and practice of  respect (li) and brotherhood (ti). And  with 

the  practice  of  brotherhood,  exchanges,  spontaneous  helping  one  another  (on-going 

responsive  relationship)  and  mutual  respect,  everyone  in  the  team  is  happy  with  each 

other. According to Confucius, a  good and responsible leader can resolve social conflict 

by  concentrating  on  three  kinds  of  favorable  relationship  through  the  practice  of  filial 

piety.  Firstly,  (s)he  searches  for  peace  and  harmony  between  the  self  and  others  by 

working  on  human  nature,  calling  for  cultivating  one’s  virtues  conscientiously.  [For 

Confucius, “when virtue is practised, one enjoys a clear conscience” (Low, 2008a, pp. 33) 

and  thus  enjoying  peace  and  harmony.]  Secondly,  (s)he  seeks  to  harmonize  family, 

relatives and friends relationships through cultivating the sense of mutual responsibilities 

amongst them. Thirdly, (s)he looks for a way to diminish the possibility of violent conflict 

by establishing a humane government in which virtues overwhelm selfish contention (see 

also  Figures  1  and  2).  By  these  three  methods,  a  good  leader  attempts  to  build  up  a 

mechanism  that  sustains  and  maintains  a  comprehensive  social  structure  in  which  no 

conflict goes unnoticed and no opposition is allowed to exceed certain limits.  




E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



9

And team leadership, being applied in this way, will be at its best. Harmony also prevails. 

 

In  sum,  the  practice  of  filial  piety  supports  good  leadership.  Figure-2  illustrates  the  practice  of 



filial piety and its associated core values would enable a leader to attain good leadership. 

 

Conclusion 

Leaders who practice with the so called the Eastern traditional value of filial piety are different 

from  those  who  practice  with  some  other  normative  theories  in  the  Western  philosophical 

tradition  because  the  former  addresses  the  question  of  “Who  should  I  be?”  rather  than  “What 

action(s) should I take?”  Good leadership in this respect is concerned with the character and the 

personal  disposition  of  a  leader  him(her)self  rather  than  right  conduct  of  a  leader  that  people 

perceived.  

 

Another  different  aspect  of  good  leadership  is  the  way  in  which,  through  its  focus  on  social 



context  and  a  sense  of  collective  purpose,  it  is  readily  applicable  to  situations,  such  as  nation- 

building  or  business  activity,  where  an  agent  is  involved  in  a  shared  enterprise.  In  good 

leadership of this kind, what makes an action right is that what a virtuous leader would do in the 

same circumstances. This makes it important when seen through the particular context in which 




E-Leader Berlin 2012 

 

 



10 

an action is considered. This focus on character rather than on action itself is underlined by the 

way in which a range of qualities is seen as worthwhile. These qualities, such as loving-kindness, 

respecting  others,  courage  or  integrity,  are  valuable  for  themselves  (i.e.  they  contribute  to  the 

flourishing  of  the  agent;  to  a  good  life  in  a  peace  and  harmonious  setting)  rather  than  for 

instrumental reasons (i.e. because they produce some other instrumental goodness).  



 

 

References 

Bacon,  T.  R.  (2012).  Elements  of  influence,  American  Management  Association  (AMACOM): 

USA.  

 

Low K. C. P. (2011) ‘Confucianism Versus Taoism’, Conflict Resolution & Negotiation Journal



Volume 2011, Issue 4, pp. 111 – 127. 

 

Low,  K. C. P. (2011a). ‘Inner leadership –  What it takes to be  a  leader?’, Business Journal for 



Entrepreneurs, Vol. 2011 Issue 4, pp. 10 -15.  

 

Low,  K.  C.  P.  (2010).  ‘Values  Make  A  Leader,  the  Confucian  Perspective’,  Insights  to  A 



Changing World, Volume 2010 Issue 2, pp. 13 – 28. 

 

Low, K. C. P.  (2010a). ‘Talent Management, the Confucian Way’, Leadership & Organizational 



Management Journal, Volume 2010 Issue 3, pp. 28 - 37. 

 

Low,  K.  C.  P.    (2008)  ‘Confucian  Ethics  &  Social  Responsibility  –  The  Golden  Rule  & 



Responsibility  to  the  Stakeholders’,  Ethics  &  Critical  Thinking  Journal,  Volume  2008  Issue  4, 

pp. 46 - 54. 



 

Low,  K.  C.  P.  (2008a)  ‘Value-based  leadership:  Leading,  the  Confucian  way’,  Leadership  & 



Organizational Management Journal, Volume 2008 Issue 3, p. 32 – 41. 

 

Low,  K.  C.  P.  and  Ang,  S.  L.  (2011).  ‘Lessons  on  Positive  Thinking  and  Leadership  from 

Confucius’, Global Science And Technology Forum (GSTF) Business Review, Volume 1. No. 2, 

October 2011. pp. 199- 206. 

 

Michael, A. (1991). Freedom from Fear: Aung San Suu Kyi, Penguin Books, England. 



 

Wilson J. R. (2008) 151 quick ideas to inspire your staff, Advantage Quest Sdn. Bhd.: Malaysia. 



 


Yüklə 337,97 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə