Gaia: Genomic Analysis of Important



Yüklə 62,56 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix02.01.2018
ölçüsü62,56 Kb.
#19051


GAIA: Genomic Analysis of Important

Aberrations

Sandro Morganella

Stefano Maria Pagnotta

Michele Ceccarelli

Contents


1

Overview


1

2

Installation



2

3

Package Dependencies



2

4

Vega Data Description



2

4.1


Marker Descriptor Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

4.2



Aberrant Region Descriptor Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

4.3



Real aCGH Datset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

4.3.1



Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Dataset

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

5

Function Description



4

5.1


load_markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

5.2



load_cnv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

5.3



runGAIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

6



Homogeneous Peel-off

6

7



Run GAIA with Approximation

7

8



Integration of GAIA and Integrative Genomics Viewer

7

1



Overview

A current challenge in biology is the characterization of genetic mutations that

occur as response to a particular disease. Development of array comparative

genomic hybridization (aCGH) technology has been a very important step in

genomic mutation analysis, indeed, it enables copy number measurement in hun-

dreds of thousands of genomic points (called markers or probes). Despite the

high resolution of aCGH, accurate analysis of these data is yet a challenge. In

particular a major difficulty in mutation identification is the distinction between

driver mutations (that play a fundamental role in cancer progression) and pas-

senger mutations (which are random alterations with no selective advantages).

This document describes classes and functions of GAIA (Genomic Analysis

of Important Aberrations) package. GAIA uses a statistical framework based

1



on a conservative permutation test allowing the estimation of the probability

distribution of the contemporary mutations expected for non-driver markers.

Afterwards, the computed probability distribution and the observed data are

used to assess the statistical significance (in terms of q-value) of each marker.

Finally an iterative “peel-off” procedure is used to identify the most significant

independent regions which have a high probability to correspond to driver mu-

tations.

GAIA algorithm is carefully described in [1].

2

Installation



Install GAIA on your computer by using the following command:

source("http://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R")

biocLite("gaia")

GAIA package can be loaded in R by using the following command:

> library(gaia)

3

Package Dependencies



In order to use GAIA you need of the R package qvalue available at the bio-

conductor repository.

Note that by using the installation command biocLite the qvalue dependency

is automatically fulfilled. In contrast if GAIA has been manually installed (e.g.

using R CMD INSTALL command) you can install qvalue package by the follow-

ing command:

source("http://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R")

biocLite("qvalue")

4

Vega Data Description



In this section the data object used by GAIA will be described. This description

will be supported by the data provided in GAIA package.

4.1

Marker Descriptor Matrix



This matrix contains all needed informations about the observed markers (also

called probes). This matrix has a row for each marker and each marker is

described by a set of column reporting the name of the probe and its genomic

position. In particular the matrix has the following columns:

Probe Name : The name of the observed probe;

Chromosome : The chromosome where the probe is located;

Start : The genomic position (in bp) where the probe starts;

2



End : The genomic position (in bp) where the probe ends;

The column specifying the End position is optional and when it is missed,

start and end positions are considered to be coincident. This is the case of the

data provided within the package.

In order to load the marker descriptor matrix provided in GAIA use the

following command:

> data(synthMarkers_Matrix)

This marker descriptor matrix simulates the genomic position for the probes

of 24 chromosomes (each chromosome has 1000 probes). Chromosomes 23 and

24 represents sex chromosomes X and Y respectively.

4.2

Aberrant Region Descriptor Matrix



This matrix contains all needed informations about the observed aberrant re-

gions.This matrix has a row for each aberrant region and each of them is de-

scribed by the following columns:

Sample Name : The name of the sample in which the aberrant region is

observed;

Chromosome : The chromosome where the aberrant region is located;

Start : The genomic position (in bp) where the aberrant region starts;

End : The genomic position (in bp) where the aberrant region ends;

Num of Markers : The number of markers contained in the aberrant region;

Aberration : An integer indicating the kind of the mutation.

The column Aberration can assume only integer values in the range 0, · · · , K −

1 where K is the number of considered aberrations. For example if we are

considering loss, LOH and gain mutations than the only valid values for the

column Aberration are 0, 1 and 2.

In order to load the aberrant region descriptor matrix use the following

command:


> data(synthCNV_Matrix)

This aberrant region descriptor matrix simulates 10 samples for the chromo-

somes described by synthMarkers_Matrix. A summary of the aberrant regions

contained in this matrix follows:

4.3

Real aCGH Datset



In GAIA a real aCGH dataset is also provided, in the next we provide a brief

description of this dataset. Raw data were preprocessed by PennCNV tool [5]

and segmented by using Vega R/Bioconductor package [4].

3



Chromosome

Frequency Percentage

Start

End


Aberration Kind

1

100%



301

700


0

2

80%



301

700


0

3

60%



301

700


0

4

40%



301

700


0

5

20%



301

700


0

10

100%



1

700


1

11

80%



1

700


1

12

60%



1

700


1

13

40%



1

700


1

14

20%



1

700


1

20

100%



801

1000


2

21

80%



801

1000


2

22

60%



801

1000


2

23

40%



801

1000


2

24

20%



801

1000


2

Table 1: synthMarkers_Matrix: Aberrant Region Detail. The column Fre-

quency Percentage reports the percentage of samples containing the indicated

aberration.

4.3.1

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Dataset



CRC dataset is composed by 30 samples hybridized on SNP 250k Affymetrix

GeneChip array [2]. Raw data are available in GEO with identifier GSE13429.

Patients of this dataset were diagnosed with microsatellite-stable CRC without

polyposis.

In order to run GAIA on this dataset both aberrant region descriptor matrix

(crc) and marker descriptor matrix (crc_markers) are provided.

5

Function Description



In this section all exported functions of GAIA package are described. GAIA

works on aCGH data in which hundreds of thousands probes are contemporary

observed, so the data loading phase can be very time consuming. For this reason

in GAIA two data loading functions are provided (see Sections 5.1 and 5.2). By

using this functions the users can load just one time the data and save they into

data objects that can be used for several GAIA executions.

5.1

load_markers



This function builds the marker descriptor object used in GAIA from a marker

matrix as described in Section 4.1:

> markers_obj <- load_markers(synthMarkers_Matrix)

The marker_obj provides an easy access to the data informations contained

in the marker matrix and and it is organized as a list:

the element marker_obj[[i]] contains the descriptions of all observed mark-

ers for the i-th chromosome and it is organized as a matrix of dimension 2 × M

4



(M is the number of observed probes for the i-th chromosome). First and second

row of this matrix contains start and end position respectively.

5.2

load_cnv


This function builds the aberrant region descriptor object used in GAIA by

using both the region matrix described in Section 4.2 and the marker descriptor

object created by the function load_markers, in addition the number of the

analyzed samples must be passed as argument:

> cnv_obj <- load_cnv(synthCNV_Matrix, markers_obj, 10)

The cnv_obj is organized as a double list:

the element cnv_obj[[j]][[i]] contains the informations about the j-th

aberration of the i-th chromosome. In particular cnv_obj[[j]][[i]] is a ma-

trix of dimension N × M where N is the number of samples (in the example 10)

and M the the number of observed probes for the i-th chromosome. The element

cnv_obj[[j]][[i]][n,m] is equal to 1 if in the marker m of the chromosome

i a mutation of kind j is observed, it is equal to 0 otherwise.

5.3

runGAIA


This is the core function of the package, indeed it allows to execute GAIA algo-

rithm. In particular runGAIA has the following header:

runGAIA(cnv_obj, markers_obj, output_file_name="", aberrations = -1,

chromosomes = -1, num_iterations = 10, threshold = 0.25)

cnv_obj : The aberrant region descriptor object created by using the function

load_cnv (see Section 5.2);

markers_obj : The marker descriptor object created by the function

load_markers (see Section 5.1);

output_file_name : (default “”) The file name used to save the significant

aberrant regions. If this argument is not specified the results will be not

saved into a file;

aberrations : (default −1) The aberrations that will be analyzed. The default

value −1 indicates that all aberration will be analyzed;

chromosomes : (default −1) The chromosomes that will be to analyzed. The

default value −1 indicates that all chromosomes will be analyzed;

num_iterations : (default 10) if the number of permutation steps (if approxi-

mation is equal to -1) - the number of column of the approximation matrix

(if approximation is different to -1);

threshold : (default 0.25) Markers having q-values lower than this threshold

are labeled as significantly aberrant. This parameter must be a real num-

ber in the range 0 − 1;

5



hom_threshold : (default 0.12) Threshold used in homogeneous peel-off (for

more detail see Section 6). This parameter must be a real number in the

range 0 − 1 and by using values lower than −1 homogeneous peel-off is

disabled and standard peel-off procedure is used;

approximation : (default=FALSE) if approximation is FALSE then GAIA ex-

plicitly performs the permutations, if it is TRUE then GAIA uses an

approximated approach to compute the null distribution.

Suppose that we want to analyze all aberrations and all chromosomes and

that we want to save the results within the file CompleteResults.txt, than we

use the following command:

> results <- runGAIA(cnv_obj, markers_obj, "CompleteResults.txt")

Both in the file CompleteResults.txt and in the matrix variable results we

can found all significant aberrant regions. In particular the following column

are used to describe each significant aberrant region:

Chromosome : The chromosome where the aberrant region is located;

Aberration Kind : An integer indicating the kind of the mutation;

Region Start [bp ]: The genomic position (in bp) where the aberrant region

starts;


Region End [bp ]: The genomic position (in bp) where the aberrant region

ends;


Region Size [bp ]: The size (in bp) of the aberrant region;

q-value : The estimated q-value for the aberrant region.

So with the following command we print the significant aberrant regions

having the minimum q-values:

> results[which(results[,6]==min(results[,6])),]

Suppose now that we want to analyze only the aberration 1 on the chro-

mosomes 10, 11 and 14 and that we want to save the results within the file

Results.txt. In addition we increase the significance threshold value from 0.25

to 0.5, than we use the following command:

> results <- runGAIA(cnv_obj, markers_obj, "Results.txt", aberrations=1, chromosomes=c(10, 11, 14), threshold=0.5)

6

Homogeneous Peel-off



In GAIA a new peel-off procedure, called homogeneous, is available. By usinh

homogeneous peel-off significant regions are detected by using both statistical

significance and within-sample homogeneity, so that more accurate results can

be obtained. Homogeneous peel-off is disabled for values lower than 0.

Homogeneous peel-off can be used only if two kinds of aberrations are ob-

served. In the next we show as homogeneous peel-off can be used on CRC

dataset. The first step is composed by the loading of the data and the creation

of the respective markers and aberrant regions descriptor objects:

6



> data(crc_markers)

> data(crc)

> crc_markers_obj <- load_markers(crc_markers)

> crc_cnv_obj <- load_cnv(crc, crc_markers_obj, 30)

Now we can run GAIA with homogeneous pee-off on the chromosome 14 by

using the suggested value for hom_threshold of 0.12:

> res <- runGAIA(crc_cnv_obj, crc_markers_obj, "crcResults.txt",

chromosomes=14, hom_threshold=0.12)

Results of the computation are saved in the file crcResults.txt

7

Run GAIA with Approximation



In GAIA a new approach to compute the null distribution is available. This

approach performs an approximation of the permutations. In particular, after

computed the frequency of alteration for each sample θ

j

, GAIA simulates a



matrix with dimension N ×K (N is the number of samples and K is the number

of performed approximation) where each column is a vector in which the element

j has a probability for drawing 1 equal to θ

j

. This asymptotically approximates



the original simulation when M → ∞ and since M is large enough, it is well

approximated in practice. So we suggest to use this approach in high resolution

scenario.

With the following command we run GAIA in its approximated version on

all chromosomes by performing K = 5000 approximations.

> res <- runGAIA(crc_cnv_obj, crc_markers_obj, "crc_approx_Results.txt", hom_threshold=0.12, num_iterations=5000, approximation=TRUE)

Results of the computation are saved in the file crcResults.txt

8

Integration of GAIA and Integrative Genomics



Viewer

The Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV) [6] is a high-performance visualization

tool for interactive exploration of large, integrated datasets. It supports a wide

variety of data types including sequence alignments, microarrays, and genomic

annotations.

From version 1.5 GAIA produces in output a “.gistic”file that can be loaded

in IGV so that computed q-values for all analyzed chromosomes can be plotted.

References

[1] Morganella,S. et al. (2010) Finding recurrent copy number alterations pre-

serving within-sample homogeneity. Bioinformatics, DOI: 10.1093/bioinfor-

matics/btr488.

[2] Venkatachalam,R. et al. (2010) Identification of candidate predisposing copy

number variants in familial and early-onset colorectal cancer patients. Int. J.

Cancer.


7


[3] Astolfi,A. et al. (2010) A molecular portrait of gastrointestinal stromal tu-

mors: an integrative analysis of gene expression profiling and high-resolution

genomic copy number. Laboratory Investigation 90(9), 1285-1294.

[4] Morganella,S. et al. (2010) VEGA: variational segmentation for copy number

detection. Bioinformatics 26(25), 3020-3027.

[5] Wang,K. et al. (2007) PennCNV: an integrated hidden Markov model de-

signed for high-resolution copy number variation detection in whole-genome

SNP genotyping data. Genome Research 17, 1665-1674.

[6] Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV): http://www.broadinstitute.org/

software/igv/home



8

Document Outline



Yüklə 62,56 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə