Jbc 29-3 Digital (dragged) 39. pdf



Yüklə 89,25 Kb.

tarix02.10.2017
ölçüsü89,25 Kb.


59

JBC 29:3 (2015): 59–68

Shortly before his death Mark Twain wrote in his autobiography: 

Men are born; they labor and sweat and struggle for bread;… 

age creeps upon them; infirmities follow; those they love are 

taken from them, and the joy of life is turned to aching grief…

Death comes at last—the only unpoisoned gift earth ever had 

for them—and they vanish from a world which will lament 

them a day and forget them forever.

1

The  Preacher’s  opening  verses  in  Ecclesiastes  are  similar  to Twain’s  sentiment: 



“Vanity of vanities! All is vanity. What does man gain by all the toil at which he 

toils under the sun? A generation goes, and a generation comes… There is no 

remembrance of former things” (Eccl 1:2–4, 11). Both Twain and the Preacher 

voice questions our souls long to have answered: Where does one find enduring 

meaning, life purpose, and sustainable joy, and why do so few seem to find it? 

Psychiatrist and Auschwitz survivor Viktor Frankl also wrestled with such 

questions.  He  searched  for  answers  after  watching  fellow  prisoners  “run  the 

wire”—a common form of suicide whereby a prisoner would intentionally run 

into the electrically charged barbed-wire fence surrounding the camp. With no 

hope of the war ending before they slowly starved to death, many prisoners gave 

up the will to live. For Frankl, clinging to images of his wife is what kept him 

1

 



 

Mark Twain, My Autobiography: “Chapters” from the North American Review (Mineola, NY: Dover 

Publications, 1999), 29.

Man’s Search for Meaning:

Viktor Frankl’s Psychotherapy

by KRIS HEMPHILL

Kris Hemphill (MBA) is a counselor for SoulCare, a ministry of Calvary Baptist Church in Easton, PA. She 

is pursuing a Master of Arts in counseling at Westminster Theological Seminary.



60

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

from doing the same. Many mornings while marching to the day’s worksite in 

bone-chilling temperatures, he’d engage in imaginary conversations with his wife. 

He’d ask her questions, and she’d answer. “In my mind I took bus rides, unlocked 

the front door of my apartment, answered the telephone, switched on the lights.”

2

 

Imagining such everyday scenes took on new meaning for Frankl. They offered a 



reason to live, a refuge from the cruelty and spiritual poverty of the death camp. 

Frankl’s experiences at Auschwitz impacted him significantly, and after the 

war  he  developed  an  existential  psychotherapeutic  model  called  logotherapy

Its central focus is man’s desire to find meaning.

3

 Although less utilized in the 



United States, logotherapy is still widely practiced in many parts of the world, 

particularly Europe and South America. Clearly it resonates with people. In fact, 

Jimmy Fallon, the popular TV host of NBC’s Tonight Show, recently shared on 

his show that he read Frankl’s book, Man’s Search for Meaning, while recovering 

from surgery. Holding up the book to the camera, he described how it greatly 

encouraged him by showing him the meaning of his life: “I belong on TV…

talking to others…and if anyone is suffering at all, I’m here to make you laugh.” 

Why  is  it  that  Frankl’s  system  continues  to  impact  so  many  lives  today? 

And  what  can  biblical  counselors  learn  from  it?  How  should  we  critique  it? 

Before delving into these questions, I will summarize Frankl’s conceptualization  

of logotherapy. 

What Is Logotherapy?

 The term logotherapy derives from the translation of the Greek term logos, which 

denotes  “meaning.”

4

  As  a  meaning-based  therapy,  its  methodology  is  future-



focused.  The  goal  is  to  find  meaning  for  the  patient  to  fulfill  going  forward, 

because “finding meaning in one’s life is the primary motivational force in man.”

5

 

Frankl believes that finding meaning is man’s greatest motivation, and he stresses 



2

 

 



Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning (Boston: Beacon Press, 2006), 39.

3

 



 

Ibid., 98.

4

 

 



It is important to note that Frankl’s use of logos differs from the one used in Scripture to describe 

Jesus Christ, as in John 1:1. 

5

 

 



Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning, 99.

Frankl believes that finding meaning 

is man’s greatest motivation.



61

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

man’s responsibility to actualize it. This goal makes logotherapy less retrospective 

and less introspective than psychoanalysis.

6

 It is also much less concerned with 



techniques for symptom alteration than the psychotherapies popular in the U.S.

In logotherapy, meaning is unique for each person and can change over time. 

Even so, Frankl identifies three sources where people commonly find meaning: 

1.  work and achievement

2.  love and relationships; and

3.  the attitude one takes toward unavoidable suffering. 

The logotherapist’s job is to help people discover a meaning for their lives in one 

or more of these three areas. 

Finding meaning enables a person to say “yes to life,” even in the face of great 

difficulties. Frankl identifies these difficulties also as a triad: the “tragic triad” 

of pain, guilt, and death. People who are searching for meaning may come for 

counseling because their struggle with one aspect of the tragic triad has unsettled 

them.  Frankl  would  use  people’s  present  difficulty  to  help  them  find  future 

meaning in either work, relationships or their attitude toward suffering. 

The goal then is to develop what Frankl called “tragic optimism” in the face 

of pain, guilt, and death. This positive view is rooted in the belief that there is 

potential  meaning  to  be  found  even  in  the  most  miserable  of  circumstances. 

“What matters,” noted Frankl, “is to make the best of any given situation.”

7

 To 


make the best of pain is to “transform a personal tragedy into a triumph” by 

facing it with dignity and honor. “In some way, suffering ceases to be suffering at 

the moment it finds a meaning.”

8

 To make the best of guilt is to welcome it as an 



opportunity to change for the better by making different choices in the future. To 

make the best of death is to embrace the challenge it poses and to make the most 

out of every moment of our lives.

To gain a better understanding of how logotherapy works, let’s look at three 

of Frankl’s case studies. 

Logotherapy Case Studies

Consider the different ways Frankl helped his patients. Though each person was 

facing  an  aspect  of  the  tragic  triad,  he  guided  them  to  discover  one  or  more 

potential sources of meaning by applying logotherapy. 



Facing pain

. A mother was suicidal after one of her sons died at age eleven, 

leaving her with one remaining son who was paralyzed since birth. Grief stricken, 

6

 



 

Ibid., 98.

7

 

 



Ibid., 137.

8

 



 

Ibid., 113.




62

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

the mother tried to convince the disabled son to commit suicide with her. He 

refused.  “For  him,  life  had  remained  meaningful.”

9

 To  help  the  mother  find 



meaning, Frankl oriented her attention toward the future. He showed her how 

caring for her disabled son spared him a life of institutionalized care. The woman 

burst into tears. “I have made a fuller life possible for him… I can look back 

peacefully on my life for my life was full of meaning, and I have tried hard to 

fulfill it.”

10

 



Facing  guilt

.

  Speaking  to  a  group  of  prisoners  at  San  Quentin  Prison  in 

California,  Frankl  said,  “You  are  human  beings  like  me,  and  as  such  you  were 

free to commit a crime, to become guilty. Now, however, you are responsible for 

overcoming guilt by rising above it, by growing beyond yourselves, by changing for 

the better.” Years later, Frankl received a letter from one of the prisoners showing 

how he had risen above his guilt. He shared that following his release from prison, 

he  started  a  logotherapy  group  for  ex-felons.  “We  are  twenty-seven  strong  and 

newer ones are staying out of prison.”

11

 By helping each group member identify 



what gave his life meaning, this man believed logotherapy was the reason all but 

one were able to stay out of prison. 



Facing death

. A rabbi who had lost his wife and children in the concentration 

camps despaired further when he realized his second wife was sterile. The rabbi 

believed that because his children died as innocent martyrs, they were given the 

highest place in heaven. He, a sinful man, could never expect to join them because 

he believed that he needed a son of his own to say Kaddish

12

 for him upon his 



death. Frankl offered potential meaning by appealing to the man’s belief system. “Is 

it not conceivable, Rabbi, that precisely this was the meaning of you surviving your 

children: that you may be purified through these years of suffering, so that you, 

too, though not innocent like your children, may become worthy of joining them in 

9

 

 



Ibid., 116.

10

   



Ibid., 117.

11

   



Ibid., 149.

12

   



Kaddish is a Jewish prayer of praise for God commonly recited at funerals. Sons are required to 

say Kaddish for eleven months after the death of a parent, in part to increase the merit of the deceased 

parent in the eyes of God.

There are ways we can be stimulated by Frankl’s   

model, even though we would not replicate its 

core elements due to our scriptural convictions. 




63

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

Heaven?”

13

 The perspective that Frankl offered not only made meaning out of this 



man’s suffering, but also gave him the future hope of reuniting with his children. 

According  to  Frankl,  these  people  found  relief  through  the  new  point 

of view he opened up to them. All were able to move forward as they found 

meaning  in  achievement,  or  love,  or  a  positive  attitude  toward  suffering—or 

some combination of these. But this raises several questions. Is the hope Frankl 

offered his patients of lasting value? Is any source of meaning fair game as long 

as it instills feelings of hope for the patient in the here and now? How should 

Christians think about logotherapy as a model of care? 



Evaluating Logotherapy: What’s Useful and What’s Not

Frankl  was  an  excellent  observer  of  human  behavior.  Though  he  was  not  a 

Christian, his resultant theory comports with certain aspects of biblical truth. 

There are ways we can be stimulated by his model, even though we would not 

replicate its core elements due to our scriptural convictions. Let’s explore what we 

can take away from Frankl’s model and what we must leave behind. 



How logotherapy is useful

. Consider some of the ways logotherapy maps 

onto biblical realities. 

It acknowledges a question that is on all people’s hearts: What is the 

meaning of my life? 

It  observes  a  longing  of  the  human  heart:  I  want  to  find  meaning, 

identity and purpose.

It validates our desire to find meaning in our pain and suffering.

It recognizes that meaning can be an issue of life or death by passionately 

acknowledging that the pain of hopelessness is deep and visceral. 

It affirms the dignity of man. Every person is unique and has value. The 

totality of our being is not merely physical, but also spiritual, and we 

possess the capacity and freedom to respond to our environment rather 

than simply being subject to it. 

It seeks to offer practical help to those who struggle with meaninglessness. 

We  can  also  affirm  other  aspects  of  Frankl’s  work,  including  the  thoughtful 

summary he devised for helping us think through areas of human suffering (i.e., 

the tragic triad of pain, guilt and death). In addition, he correctly recognized 

that there is meaning to be found in honest work, loving relationships, and 

learning how to suffer well. Despite these strengths, the scope and depth of 

Frankl’s help is limited and cannot have everlasting value in the lives of those 

he seeks to help. 

13

   


Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning, 120.


64

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL



How logotherapy is limited.

 As with any secular model, the underlying 

presuppositions  of  Frankl’s  model  are  inherently  flawed,  and  his  solutions  to 

human suffering do not go deep enough. Consider these limitations:



Frankl’s willingness to work with any patient’s faith commitment. Though 

Frankl leaves the door open to the possibility that some higher power 

may exist to explain “ultimate meaning” in human suffering, he considers 

anyone’s  definition  of  higher  power  as  equally  valid  for  therapeutic 

purposes. But if there is, in fact, one true and living God, then attempts 

to  garner  power  from  a  source  or  reason  other  than  the  true  God  is 

ultimately hebel, the Hebrew word for “vanity.” Finding meaning apart 

from God is altogether futile. 



Frankl’s view that man is self-determining. Frankl believes each person has 

“the option for what, to what, or to whom he understands himself to be 

responsible.”

14

 Failing to understand human responsibility before God, 



truth is relative and individualized based on one’s experience.

Frankl’s belief in man’s decency. “There are two races of men in this world, 

but only these two—the ‘race’ of the decent man and the ‘race’ of the 

indecent man.”

15

 Frankl’s belief that man is either “saint or swine” denies 



the biblical reality of the human condition. The nature of man is to rebel 

against God. The decent may rebel and the indecent may repent and 

believe, as in Jesus’ parable of the decent Pharisee and the indecent tax 

collector (Luke 18:9–14). 



Frankl’s certainty that people can effectively deal with their own guilt. In 

his speech to the San Quentin prisoners, Frankl said that man can “rise 

above his guilt” by choosing to become a better version of himself and 

by acting on his freedom to behave better in the future. While Frankl 

is able to partially recognize man’s guilt, he offers an idea that surely 

sounds good to its hearers but that is wholly ineffectual in reality. Only 

God offers a true solution to our guilt. 

I am struck by Frankl’s passionate desire to share with others what he learned from 

his own unimaginable suffering at the hands of wicked men. However, any system 

that erases God and elevates us by denying our sinful nature ignores the necessity of 

the cross. It cannot offer lasting meaning. True hope is found in the biblical Logos, 

Jesus, who meets man’s most fundamental need and not his perceived need for 

meaning. Jesus meets man’s deeper need to be ransomed and rescued. 

14

   



Ibid., 109-110.

15

   



Ibid., 86.


65

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

As  Christians,  we  can  offer  sufferers  something  far  better. We  offer  them 

a  person,  the  One  who  is  well  acquainted  with  grief,  guilt  and  death.  Christ 

corrects  and  informs  our  distorted  understanding  of  where  true  meaning  is 

found. He teaches us that meaning cannot be found in anything under the sun. 

Though people long to find meaning in their work, relationships and suffering, 

it is only when we are in Christ that we will be able to answer the question: Why 

am I here? We find meaning in the context of work, relationships and suffering 

as we live vitally connected to our God and Savior. 

Consider how Scripture addresses logotherapy’s three sources for meaning: 

Work. God calls us to subdue and have dominion over his creation (Gen 

1:28). Moreover, we are created to do good works (Eph 2:10) in worship 

of him. 

Relationships.  Because  we  are  created  in  the  image  of  God,  we  are 

designed  to  be  in  relationship  with  him  and  to  reflect  that  intimate 

union in our relationships with others. We are called to imitate God’s 

selfless love toward us by serving one another (Matt 20:28). 



Suffering. God uses suffering to expose our hearts (Ps 119:67–71), to see 

our need for him, and to conform us into his image (Isa 48:10; Rom 

8:28–29). 

Only when we understand meaning in light of the Son will we experience lasting 

joy in life under the sun.

Can Logotherapy Be Useful to Biblical Counselors?

In a sense, yes—logotherapy can be useful. In a deep way, no. God often gives 

certain insights to secular people that can sharpen our counseling. The call to 

pay attention to where people look to find meaning is one of those insights. Let’s 

revisit each of Frankl’s three case studies. We will look at both what Frankl did 

that was helpful, and how biblical counselors are able to go deeper by pointing 

each person to a fuller and more lasting meaning. 

Facing pain: the case of the suicidal mother

. Frankl helped this woman view 

her future in a new way. He effectively located a reason for her to live and not 

commit suicide. He began to move her through the grieving process by directing 

her focus from the pain of the present to the future meaning found in the care 

Christ corrects and informs our distorted 

understanding of where true meaning is found. 



66

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

of her disabled son. He creatively helped her visualize what her son’s life would 

be like in two scenarios: one with her in it and one without her in it. Frankl 

made her feel understood, needed, and loved. By meeting her immediate need 

for meaning, Frankl helped her choose life. But what happens if a day should 

come when she can no longer care for her son? Or what if she outlives him, or 

becomes too ill to offer care, or he rejects her because of some unforeseen conflict 

that erupts between them? Would her life again collapse into meaninglessness? 

As Christians, we agree that motherhood is a high calling by God—one that 

offers legitimate meaning in service to her son. However, we would not serve her 

well if we did not connect her with the source of all meaning—the author of life 

who blessed her with the gift of motherhood. We help her see that motherhood is 

meant to point her to her heavenly Father—her eternal caretaker—who tenderly 

and lovingly meets her every need. His care of her will never end, even if her care 

for her son does end. Motherhood is a practical way for her to enjoy and adore 

Christ, not to satisfy her desire to feel needed. God warns that such desires can 

serve as a snare if elevated as an object of worship. 

We would help her see that her identity—the essence of who she is—cannot 

be  found  in  anything  tied  to  this  world,  no  matter  how  noble.  Regardless  of 

which meaning source she chooses, it is subject to change. Meaning is transitory, 

based on one’s circumstances. Ecclesiastes describes this as a chasing after wind 

(Eccl 1:14, 17; 2:11). Lasting identity must be firmly planted in the Lord who is 

her rock (Ps 18:2) rather than the shifting sands of earthly treasures. 



Facing  guilt:  the  case  of  the  San  Quentin  prisoners.

  Frankl’s  system 

achieved a measure of success for some of the prisoners at San Quentin. All but 

one of the twenty-seven ex-prisoners attending the logotherapy group stayed out 

of prison. Elements of Frankl’s system appear to have helped the prisoners. But 

which ones and why? 

First of all, Frankl treated them with dignity and respect. He related to them: 

“You are human beings like me.” They likely felt accepted and not shamed. He 

wisely counseled them to take full responsibility for their actions—and not blame 

their wrongdoing on society, their upbringing, or any biological, psychological, 

and/or  sociological  factor. To  do  otherwise,  he  said,  would  be  tantamount  to 

explaining away their guilt, as if each person is “a machine to be repaired”

16

 rather 



than an individual who is free to choose his or her actions. 

Frankl sees the dignity, freedom and responsibility of man, but his inaccurate 

view of guilt and hope has consequences. Guilt equates to feelings of remorse, 

despair and hopelessness that stem from knowing one has done wrong in the 

16

   


Ibid., 149.


67

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

past. But the new hopefulness these prisoners reported gaining from logotherapy 

was rooted in the idea that future good works can make up for, or assuage, the 

guilt of past actions. When Frankl tells the prisoners, “You are responsible for 

overcoming your guilt by rising above it,” he is promoting a classic humanistic 

belief.  As  fallen  people,  we  crave  self-empowerment.  We  want  to  solve  our 

own problems without the help of God. The self-help genre and the “I can do 

anything” mindset are hebel—vanity. Only God can offer a deep solution for 

man’s guilt because our guilt is before God. Although Frankl rightly asserts that 

the prisoner’s guilt cannot be explained by seeing him as a machine broken by 

outside  influences,  the  prisoner  is  nonetheless  broken—spiritually  broken.  He 

needs restoration, to be made whole, by the saving work of Christ.

Facing death: the case of the grief-stricken rabbi

.

 Frankl sought to offer 

compassion and understanding as he listened well to the rabbi’s deep pain of 

loss.  Frankl  asked  good  questions.  He  worked  hard  to  know  the  rabbi  well. 

He saw the importance of taking into account this rabbi’s belief system as an 

orthodox Jew, knowing that it would have important implications for how he 

responded to his present struggle. Yet this very premise is troubling. Frankl states 

unequivocally that logotherapy is open to working with anyone’s belief system, 

thereby becoming a means to an end—a false one. 

While Frankl seeks to help this man grieve his losses, his understanding of 

what it means to suffer well is in direct opposition to ours who know the risen 

Christ. “When a patient stands on the firm ground of religious belief, there can 

be no objection to making use of the therapeutic effect of his religious convictions 

and thereby drawing on his religious resources.”

17

 As an orthodox Jew, Frankl 



knew this man’s despair stemmed from his belief that, in effect, he had no son 

to pray him into heaven. Frankl then set out to convince the rabbi that his tears 

from grieving could earn him merit with God, thereby improving his chances to 

join his children in heaven. To support this, Frankl quoted Psalm 56:8: “Thou 

has kept count of my tossings; put thou my tears in thy bottle! Are they not in 

thy book?” Frankl took this Scripture out of context, but this would be of no 

consequence to him. It achieved the goals of his counseling—to offer this man 

relief from despair and a way to suffer well. Frankl’s “anything goes” methodology 

is troublesome at best.

We would show this rabbi how the Messiah offers the true answer to his fears 

about eternity. Through Christ, he can have assurance of salvation and not rely 

on the wishful (and false) hope Frankl offers. For no man can have enough sons, 

who can say enough Kaddish, that will earn him enough merit in the eyes of a 

17

   



Ibid., 119.


68

MAN’S SEARCH FOR MEANING: VIKTOR FRANKL’S PSYCHOTHERAPY  |  HEMPHILL

just and holy God. Only the merit of Christ’s sacrifice, God’s Son, will suffice. 

This same Savior also offers meaning to the rabbi’s suffering. God can actually 

use it for his good here on earth. For Christians, suffering is a way to identify 

with Christ as our Suffering Servant, the Man of Sorrows. He uses it to increase 

our awareness and need of him (Ps 68:19), to refine, strengthen and perfect us 

to keep us from falling (Ps 66:8–9; Heb 2:10), and to draw us into a deeper 

relationship with him (2 Cor 4:16–18). 

God offers a better solution to each of Frankl’s three case studies. He offers 

them  a  relationship,  not  a  self-generated  system.  His  divine  grace  sets  their 

affections on a new trajectory through repentance and faith. He offers them an 

eternal perspective, one in which the cross mercifully sheds new light on existing 

struggles. And as they seek first to covenant with God, meaning and purpose will 

be added to them (Matt 6:33).

The End of the Matter

Mark Twain, Viktor Frankl and the Preacher in Ecclesiastes have much in common. 

They lived in very different times and had very different life experiences, but all 

three described many of the same realities of living in a world corrupted by evil. 

All three acknowledged the brevity and futility of life. Each shared a yearning to 

find meaning, a way to make sense of the pain and suffering of this world. Yet, as 

each one neared the end of his life, each arrived at a different conclusion to the 

question of meaning. Mark Twain deemed that the world was devoid of all hope 

and meaning. Frankl said there is meaning to be realized, but it is self-generated. 

Only the Preacher offers a complete answer that goes deep enough and lasts long 

enough. “Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of 

man” (Eccl 12:13). This will withstand any tragedy that besets us because the true 

Logos never wavers, never sleeps, never leaves and never forsakes.



 

 

The Journal of Biblical Counseling

 

(ISSN: 1063-2166) is published by:  



 

Christian Counseling & Educational Foundation  

 

1803 East Willow Grove Avenue  



Glenside, PA 19038! 

 

www.ccef.org



 

 

 



 

 

 



Copyright © 2015 CCEF  

All rights reserved. 

 

 

For permission to copy or distribute! JBC articles, 



please go to: 

www.ccef.org/make-a-request



 

!





Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə