Jeod cfp special Issue Vieta & Lionais v5



Yüklə 38,17 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix11.04.2018
ölçüsü38,17 Kb.
#37508


 

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com    

Published by

::::    

    


 

 

 

 

 



The Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity (JEOD)

Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity (JEOD)

Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity (JEOD)

Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity (JEOD)    launches a call for 

papers for a special issue on: 

 

“The Cooperative Advantage for Community Development” 



 

Guest editors:  

Marcelo Vieta (

marcelo.vieta@euricse.eu

) and Doug Lionais (

doug_lionais@cbu.ca

 

Deadline for submissions: February 1, 2014. 



 

 

 



While  some  theorists  have  minimalized  cooperatives  as  “transitional”  firms  or  “inefficient” 

organizations  with  “incentive”  issues  (e.g.,  Furubotn  &  Pejovich,  1970;  Hansmann,  1996; 

Jensen  &  Meckling,  1979),  empirical  evidence  has  shown  that  coops  are  diverse 

organizations that efficaciously address a plurality of socio-economic needs (e.g., Borzaga & 

Galera,  2012;  Perotín,  2012;  Zamagni  &  Zamagni, 2010).  Cooperation seems to  actually be 

effective  in  provisioning  for  myriad  life  needs,  and  cooperatives  do  so  in  more  egalitarian 

and sustainable ways than investor-owned firms. Cooperatives, in a nutshell, embody what 

has  been called “the cooperative  advantage”  (Birchall, 2003;  Novkovic, 2007). This  includes 

their horizontal structures, their tight links to local communities, the principles and values of  

 

Call for Papers 



“The Cooperative Advantage for  

Community Development” 




 

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com    

Published by

::::    

    


 

 

 



mutual aid and self-help that drive them, their counter-cyclical trends in times of crises, and 

the overall “associative intelligence” they promote amongst members (Macpherson, 2002). 

Coops have historically highlighted the “cooperative advantage” in how they have responded 

to  situations  of  socio-economic  shortcomings  or  distress.  In  times  of  austerity  especially, 

coops  (re)emerge  to  prominence  as  community  development  organizations.  More  than 

simply  a  coping  mechanism,  however,  coops  are  used  to  construct  alternative  economic 

spaces  (Leyshon,  Lee,  &  Williams,  2003).  For  instance,  the  cooperative  sector  has  played  a 

key role in the social, cultural, and economic revival of regions such as the Basque Country, 

Trentino, and Kerala. In response to more recent austere times, Cleveland has set out on a 

path  of  rebuilding  community  wealth  through  worker  cooperatives.  These  and  other 

examples  demonstrate  the  potential  for  cooperatives  to  stabilize,  repair,  build  and  shift 

community  economies.  Indeed,  cooperatives  have  proven  to  be  highly  effective  firms  for  a 

new type of community development—for 

another development different to the one offered 

by advocates of the neoliberal, “trickle-down” model. 

The  Journal  of  Entrepreneurial  and  Organizational  Diversity  (JEOD)  invites  researchers  to 

submit theoretical, empirical, or historical papers or case studies that analyze, demonstrate 

or  critique  the  cooperative  advantage  for  community  development.  We  encourage  papers 

from  the  perspectives  of  organizational,  management,  development,  environmental,  or 

cooperative  studies,  or  from  the  broader  fields  of  economics,  sociology,  geography, 

anthropology,  or  other  social  sciences.  Papers  must  have  a  sound  analytical  base.  We  are 

open  to  different  research  methodologies,  as  long  as  they  are  relevant  to  the  topic  and 

employed  rigorously. 

Possible  methodologies  include,  for  example,  empirical  studies, 

experiments,  surveys,  theoretical  models,  meta-analyses,  and  case  studies.  In  empirical 

work, it is important that relevant results are statistically or economically significant. 

Case  studies  must  be  treated  rigorously,  and  require  any  theoretical  proposition  to  be 

supported by econometric tests or solid historical and circumstantial evidence.  

Literature  reviews  that  integrate  findings  from  many  studies  are  also  welcome,  but  they 

should synthesize the literature in a useful manner and provide a substantial contribution to 

the debate.  



 

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com    

Published by

::::    

    


 

 

 



Research  questions  that  could  be  taken  up  include,  but  are  certainly  not  limited,  to  the 

following: 

1.

 

Is there a cooperative advantage in community development? 



2.

 

What promising cooperative experiments or movements exist today, or existed in 



the  past,  that  contribute  or  contributed  to  (an  alternative?)  community 

development? 

3.

 

How do the International Cooperative Alliances’ principles and values facilitate (or 



hinder) the cooperative advantage for community development? 

4.

 



Do cooperatives contribute to poverty reduction, socio-economic inclusion, social 

cohesion, social justice, or peace? 

5.

 

Do  cooperatives  contribute to  the  formation  of  social norms of  trust, reciprocity, 



and cooperation?  

6.

 



How  can  the  cooperative  advantage  be  theorized  in  regards  to  community 

development?  

7.

 

How can the cooperative advantage respond to the need for more environmentally 



sustainable economic realities? 

8.

 



Can  the  cooperative  advantage  help  reconfigure  social,  political,  or  economic 

dimensions in more sustainable and more equitable directions? 

9.

 

How  is  the  cooperative  advantage  being  deployed  today  in  the  global  North  or 



South,  and  in  particular  in  the  former  Eastern  Bloc’s  “transition  economies,”  or 

within otherwise marginalized communities? 

10.

 

 How  do  cooperatives  relate  to  other  progressive  forms  of  economic  alterity, 



particularly those of the solidarity and social economies 

    


    

    


    

    


    

    



 

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com

www.jeodonline.com    

Published by

::::    

    


 

 

 



Submission 

Submission 

Submission 

Submission Procedure

Procedure

Procedure

Procedure    

    


 

Submissions can be made via the journal website at: 



www.jeodonline.com

. Please 

indicate clearly that you are submitting for the “Cooperative Advantage for  

 



Community Development” issue. Information on the submission process and 

formatting requirements are available on the site. 

 

Deadline for submissions: February 1, 2014. 



 

Please direct any further inquiries to the issue’s guest-editors:  



Marcelo Vieta (

marcelo.vieta@euricse.eu

) or Doug Lionais (

doug_lionais@cbu.ca

), or to 

Ilana Gotz, JEOD Managing Editor (

liana.gotz@euricse.eu

). 


    

    


References

References

References

References    

    

Birchall,  J.  R.  (2003). 



Rediscovering  the  co-operative  advantage:  Poverty  reduction  through  self-help

Geneva: International Labour Organization. 



Borzaga, C., & Galera, G. (2012). Promoting the understanding of cooperatives for a better world: Euricse's 

contribution  to  the  International  Year  of  Cooperatives. 

http://www.euricse.eu/en/euricse-

contribution-IYC

  

Furubotn, E. G., & Pejovich, S. (1970). Property rights and the behaviour of the firm in a socialist state: The 



example of Yugoslavia. 

Zeitschrift für Nationalökonomie, 30

(3-4), 431-454. 

Hansmann,  H.  (1996). 

The  ownership  of  enterprise

.  Cambridge,  MA:  The  Belknap  Press  of  Harvard 

University Press.    

Jensen,  M.  C.,  &  Meckling,  W.  H.  (1976).  Theory  of  the  firm:  Managerial  behavior,  agency  costs  and 

ownership structure. 

Journal of Financial Economics, 3

(4), 305-360. 

Leyshon, A., Lee, R., & Williams, C. C. (2003). 

Alternative economic spaces

. London: Sage. 

MacPherson, I. (2002). Encouraging associative intelligence: Co-operatives, shared learning and responsible 

citizenship. 

Journal of Co-operative Studies, 35

(2), 86-98. 

Novkovic, S. (2008). Defining the co-operative difference. 

Journal of Socio-Economics, 37

(6), 2168-2177. 

Pérotin,  V.  (2012,  March  15-16). 

Workers'  cooperatives:  Good,  sustainable  jobs  in  the  community

.  Paper 

presented  at  the  Promoting  the  Understanding  of  Cooperatives  for  a  Better  World.  San  Servolo, 

Venice, Italy. 

Zamagni,  S.,  &  Zamagni,  V.  (2010). 

Cooperative  enterprise:  Facing  the  challenge  of  globalization



Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.    




Yüklə 38,17 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə