Julian W. Connolly Professor Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures University of Virginia



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1 Julian W. Connolly

Professor

Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

University of Virginia
Office Address Home Address
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures 625 Ivy Lane

University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 22901

P.O. Box 400783 Phone: (434) 979-3195

Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4783

Phone: (434) 924-3548; Fax: (434) 982-2744

E-mail: jwc4w@virginia.edu


EDUCATION
Ph.D. Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, 1977

Major: Russian Literature

Dissertation: “The Poetry of Ivan Bunin”

Advisors: Vsevolod Setchkarev and Kiril Taranovsky

A.M. Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, 1974

A.B. Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, 1972


TEACHING EXPERIENCE
1993 - Professor, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Virginia

1983-1993 Associate Professor, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Univ. of Virginia

1977-1983 Assistant Professor, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Univ. of Virginia

1973-1977 Teaching Fellow, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University


HONORS AND AWARDS
2016 Richard Stites Senior Scholar Award, Southern Conference on Slavic Studies

2015 Sesquicentennial Associateship, University of Virginia

2013 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

2012 Buckner W. Clay Award in the Humanities, University of Virginia

2011 Faculty Research Travel Grant in International Studies, University of Virginia

2010 Faculty Research Travel Grant in International Studies, University of Virginia

2008 Sesquicentennial Associateship, University of Virginia

2005 Mead Honored Faculty Award, University of Virginia

2001 University Seminar Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

2000 Small Research Grant, University of Virginia

2000 Distinguished Faculty Award, The Society of the Sound and the Fury, University of Virginia

1999 All-University Outstanding Teacher Award, University of Virginia

1999 Sesquicentennial Associateship, University of Virginia

1998 University Seminar Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1998 Faculty Senate Teaching Initiative Award to develop web site for courses in Russian literature, University of Virginia

1998 Short-Term Travel Grant for travel to Poland, International Research and Exchanges Board

1995 Short-Term Travel Grant for travel to Russia, International Research and Exchanges Board

1995 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1994 Sesquicentennial Associateship, University of Virginia

1993 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1990 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1988 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1987 Grant to prepare new course on East European Literature, Center for Russian and East European Studies, University of Virginia

1985 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia



1984 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1984 Sesquicentennial Associateship, University of Virginia

1982 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1981 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1980 Research Fellowship for recent Ph.D. recipients, American Council of Learned Societies

1979 Faculty Summer Research Grant, University of Virginia

1976 Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities, Harvard University

1972–1976 NDEA Title VI Fellowship, Harvard University

Arthur Lehman Fellowship, Harvard University

1968–1972 Phi Beta Kappa

John Harvard Scholarship

Harvard College Scholarship

History and Literature Book Prize

Detur Book Prize


PUBLICATIONS
Books Authored



  1. Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013.

  2. A Reader’s Guide to Nabokov’s Lolita. Studies in Russian and Slavic Literatures, Cultures and History. Brighton, MA: Academic Studies Press, 2009.

  3. The Intimate Stranger: Meetings with the Devil in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature. Middlebury Studies in Russian Language and Literature. Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.: New York, 2001.

  4. Nabokov's Early Fiction: Patterns of Self and Other. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

  5. Ivan Bunin. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1982. Excerpt published in Twentieth Century Literary Criticism. Vol. 253. Ed. Kathy D. Darrow. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2011. 75-81.


Books Edited


  1. The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

  2. Nabokov and His Fiction: New Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

  3. Invitation to a Beheading: A Critical Companion. Northwestern University Press / AATSEEL Critical Companions to Russian Literature. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1997.

  4. Studies in Russian Literature in Honor of Vsevolod Setchkarev. Edited with Sonia I. Ketchian. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica, 1987.


Articles


  1. “Fetching yet faithless: problematic mistresses in Nabokov’s fiction.” In Women in Nabokov’s Life and Art. Ed. Nailya Garipova and Juan José Torres Nuñez. Critical Perspectives on English and American Literature, Communication and Culture 14. Bern: Peter Lang, 2016. 123–40.

  2. “Nabokov’s Biography.” In Critical Insights Lolita. Edited by Rachel Stauffer. Ipswich, MA: Grey House Publishing / Salem Press, 2016. 18-23.

  3. “Cruel Wit: The Ethics of Humor in Vladimir Nabokov’s Fiction.” In American Contributions to the 15th International Congress of Slavists, Minsk, August 2013. Ed. David M. Bethea and Christina Y. Bethin. Bloomington, IN: Slavica, 2013. 1–11.

  4. “The Ethical Implications of Narrative Point of View in Dostoevsky’s The Double,” Dostoevsky Studies, New Series 17 (2013): 99–111.

  5. “Vladimir Nabokov.” In The Cambridge Companion to American Novelists, ed. Timothy Parrish. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 209–18.

  6. “Inserted Texts in Ivan Bunin’s Fiction.” In Twentieth Century Literature Criticism. Vol. 253. Ed. Kathy D. Darrow. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2011. 81–89.

  7. The Life of Arsenyev.” In Twentieth Century Literature Criticism. Vol. 253. Ed. Kathy D. Darrow. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2011. 75–81.

  8. “Confession in The Brothers Karamazov. In Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov: Art, Creativity, and Spirituality. Ed. Predrag Cicovacki and Maria Granik. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter GmbH Heidelberg, 2010. 13–28.

  9. “Nabokov Revising Nabokov: The Lolita Screenplays.” Revising Nabokov Revising. Proceedings of the International Nabokov Conference. Kyoto: Nabokov Society of Japan, 2010. 33–38.

  10. Pnin.Masterplots, Fourth Edition. Ed. Laurence W. Mazzeno. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 2010. 4529–31.

  11. “A Close Reading of the Enchanted Hunters Scene.” In Lolita: From Nabokov to Kubrick and Lyne. Ed. Erik Martiny. Paris: Sedes, 2009. 121–31.

  12. “Dostoevsky’s Guide to Spiritual Epiphany in The Brothers Karamazov.” In F. M. Dostoevsky in the Context of Cultural Dialogues / F. M. Dostoevskii v kontekste dialogicheskogo vzaimodeistviia kul’tur. Ed. Katalin Kroó and Tünde Szabó. Budapest: ELTE PhD Programme “Russian Literature and Literary Studies,” 2009. 113–17.

  13. “The Middle Way: Berberova between Bunin and Nabokov.” In American Contributions to the 14th International Congress of Slavists. Vol. 2: Literature. Ed. David Bethea. Bloomington: Slavica, 2008. 41–50.

  14. “A World in Flux: Pervasive Instability in Dostoevsky’s The Gambler.” Dostoevsky Studies, New Series 12 (2008): 67–79.

  15. “Russian Cultural Contexts for Lolita.” In Approaches to Teaching Nabokov’s Lolita. Ed. Zoran Kuzmanovich and Galya Diment. New York: Modern Language Association, 2008. 89–93.

  16. The Brothers Karamazov.” In Masterplots II: Christian Literature. Ed. John K. Roth. 4 vols. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 2008. 2:229–32.

  17. “Dostoevskij’s Guide to Spiritual Epiphany in The Brothers Karamazov.” Studies in East European Thought 59 (2007): 39–54. Also online at http://www.springerlink.com/content/j06521m1172xj0l7/

  18. “Why are Nymphets ‘Demonic’?: Remarks on the Cultural Roots of Nabokov’s Lolita.” In The Real Life of Pierre Delalande. Studies in Russian and Comparative Literature to Honor Alexander Dolinin. Stanford Slavic Studies, vol. 34. Ed. David M. Bethea, Lazar Fleishman, and Alexander Ospovat. Stanford: Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Stanford University, 2007. 2: 674–86.

  19. “The Challenge of Interpreting and Decoding Nabokov: Strategies and Suggestions.” Cycnos 24.1 (2007): 155–170.

  20. “Nabokov, Pushkin, and Eugene Onegin.” In Nabokofu Yakuchu Evugenii Onegin Chukai [Translation with Commentary of Nabokov’s Translation with Commentary of Eugene Onegin]. Ed. Honyaku No Shoso Kenkyukai [Research Group on “Aspects of Translation”]. Kyoto, Japan: Kyoto Daigaku Daigakuin Bungakukenkyuka, 2007.

  21. The Brothers Karamazov.” In Masterplots II: Christian Literature. Ed. John K. Roth. 4 vols. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, 2007. 2:229–32.

  22. “Black and White and Dead All Over: Color Imagery in Nabokov’s Prose.” Nabokov Studies 10 (2006): 1–14.

  23. “Introduction: The Many Faces of Vladimir Nabokov.” In The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. 1–8.

  24. “The Major Russian Novels.” In The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. 135–50.

  25. “Ivan Bunin.” Twentieth-Century Russian Émigré Writers. Ed. Maria Rubins. Dictionary of Literary Biography, vol. 317. Detroit: Thomson–Gale, 2005. 50–62.

  26. “Vladimir Nabokov.” Twentieth-Century Russian Émigré Writers. Ed. Maria Rubins. Dictionary of Literary Biography, vol. 317. Detroit: Thomson–Gale, 2005. 248–68.

  27. “The Daedalus–Icarus Theme in Nabokov’s Fiction.” In Nabokov at Cornell. Ed. Gavriel Shapiro. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003. 151–60.

  28. “Metamorphosis of a Dreamer: From Dostoevsky’s ‘White Nights’ to Nabokov’s The Eye.” American Contributions to the Thirteenth International Congress of Slavists. Volume 2: Literature. Ed. Robert A. Maguire and Alan Timberlake. Bloomington: Slavica, 2003. 31–38.

  29. “The Quest for Self-Discovery in Gogol’s ‘Vii.’” Slavic and East European Journal 46.2 (2002): 253–67.

  30. “The Elemental Nabokov: The Role of Natural Elements in Nabokov’s Fiction.” Proceedings of the International Vladimir Nabokov Symposium. Online at http://www.nabokovmuseum.org/en/events/conferences/symposium/proceedings/

  31. “Nabokov’s Approach to the Supernatural in the Early Stories.” In Torpid Smoke: The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Steven G. Kellman and Irving Malin. Studies in Slavic Literature and Poetics 35. Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000. 21–34.

  32. “The ‘Flutter of Fantasy’ in Nabokov’s Early Fiction.” In Vladimir Nabokov-Sirine: les années européenes. Cahiers de l’emigration russe 5 (2000): 45–58.

  33. “The Quest for a Natural Melody in the Fiction of Vladimir Nabokov.” In Nabokov at the Limits: Redrawing Critical Boundaries. Ed. Lisa Zunshine. New York: Garland Publishing Inc., 1999. 69–85.

  34. “Nabokov at 100.” Introduction to Nabokov and His Fiction: New Perspectives. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 1–12.

  35. “Nabokov’s (re)visions of Dostoevsky.” In Nabokov and His Fiction: New Perspectives. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 141–57. Republished in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Vol. 108. Ed. Linda Pavlovski and Scott T. Darga. Detroit: Gale, 2001.

  36. “A New ‘Spirit of Negation’: Danilov the Violist and the Image of the Devil in World Literature.” American Contributions to the Twelfth International Congress of Slavists. Ed. Robert A. Maguire and Alan Timberlake. Bloomington: Slavica, 1998. 41–51.

  37. “To See or Be Seen: The Function of the Gaze in Nabokov’s Russian Fiction.” And Meaning for a Life Entire: Festschrift for Charles A. Moser on the Occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday. Ed. Peter Rollberg. Bloomington: Slavica, 1998. 269–86.

  38. “Nabokov’s Dialogue with Dostoevsky: Lolita and ‘The Gentle Creature.’” Nabokov Studies 4 (1997): 15–36.

  39. Invitation to a Beheading: Nabokov’s ‘Violin in a Void.’” Invitation to a Beheading: A Critical Companion. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1997. 3–44.

  40. “The New Man as Object of Desire in Olesha’s Envy.” After the Watershed: Russian Prose, 19171927: Selected Essays. Ed. Nicholas Luker. Nottingham: Astra Press, 1996. 57–73.

  41. “Dark Avenues.” In Masterplots II: Short Story, Supplement. Ed. Frank N. Magill. 4 vols. Pasadena: Salem Press, 1996: 3053–55.

  42. “Cincinnatus and Différance: Subversive Discourse in Invitation to a Beheading. In Nabokov at the Crossroads of Modernism and Postmodernism. Cycnos 12.2 (1995): 73–82.

  43. “‘Nature’s Reality’ or Humbert’s ‘Fancy’: Scenes of Reunion and Murder in Lolita.” Nabokov Studies 2 (1995): 41–61.

  44. Ania v strane chudes.” In The Garland Companion to Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Vladimir E. Alexandrov. New York: Garland, 1995. 18–25.

  45. King, Queen, Knave.” In The Garland Companion to Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Vladimir E. Alexandrov. New York: Garland, 1995. 203–14.

  46. Laughter in the Dark.” In The Garland Companion to Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Vladimir E. Alexandrov. New York: Garland, 1995. 214–26.

  47. “Nabokov and Narrative Point of View: The Case of ‘A Letter That Never Reached Russia.’” Nabokov Studies 1 (1994): 9–20. Republished in Short Story Criticism. Vol. 86. Ed. Thomas J. Schoenberg and Lawrence J. Trudeau. Detroit: Gale, 2006.

  48. “Zagadka rasskazchika v Priglashenii na kazn' V. Nabokova.” In Russkaia literature XX veka: issledovaniia amerikanskikh uchenykh. Ed. Boris Averin and È. Nitraur (Elizabeth Neatrour). St. Petersburg: Petro-Rif, 1993. 446–57.

  49. “From Biography to Autobiography and Back: The Fictionalization of the Self in The Real Life of Sebastian Knight.” Cycnos 10.1 (1993): 39–46.

  50. “The Play of Light and Shadow in ‘The Fight.’” In A Small Alpine Form: Studies in Nabokov’s Short Fiction. Ed. Charles Nicol and Gennady Barabtarlo. New York: Garland Publishing Inc., 1993. 25–37.

  51. “Inserted Texts in Ivan Bunin’s Fiction.” In The Short Story in Russia 19001917. Ed. Nicholas Luker. Nottingham: Astra Press, 1991. 129–44. Excerpts reprinted in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Vol. 253. Ed. Kathy D. Darrow. Farmington Hills: Gale, 2011. 81-89.

  52. “Madness and Doubling: From Dostoevsky’s The Double to Nabokov’s The Eye.” Russian Literature Triquarterly 24 (1991): 129–39.

  53. “The Otherworldly in Nabokov’s Poetry.” Russian Literature Triquarterly 24 (1991): 329–39.

  54. “Nabokov and the Fiction of Self-Begetting.” In Literature and Exile. Ed. David Bevan. Rodopi Perspectives on Modern Literature 4. Amsterdam, 1990. 55–66.

  55. “The Nineteenth Century: Between Realism and Modernism, 1880–1895.” In The Cambridge History of Russian Literature. Ed. Charles Moser. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. 333–86. Excerpt published in Short Story Criticism. Vol. 28. Ed. Anna J. Sheets. Detroit: Gale, 1998.

  56. “Vladimir Nabokov’s The Defense and the Legacy of Nikolai Gogol.” Studies in Modern and Classical Language and Literature. Ed. Ruth M. Mésavage. Madrid: Orígenes, 1989. 131–38.

  57. “Nabokov’s ‘The Thunderstorm’ and the Mock Epic.” Russian Language Journal 43.145–46 (1989): 143–55.

  58. “Delusions or Clairvoyance? A Second Look at Madness in V. Nabokov’s Fiction.” In Aspects of Modern Russian and Czech Literature. Ed. Arnold McMillin. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica 1989. 110–17.

  59. “Vladimir Nabokov and Valerij Brjusov: An Examination of a Literary Heritage.” Die Welt der Slaven 33.1 (1988): 69–86.

  60. “Briusov’s The Fiery Angel: By Love Possessed.” Selecta 8 (1987): 102–108.

  61. “Boris Vakhtin’s ‘The Sheepskin Coat’ and Nikolai Gogol’s ‘The Overcoat.’” In Studies in Russian Literature in Honor of Vsevolod Setchkarev. Ed. Julian W. Connolly and S. Ketchian. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica, 1987. 74–86. Republished in Short Story Criticism. Vol. 222. Ed. Lawrence J. Trudeau. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2015. Online at Literature Resource Center.

  62. “Yevgeny Zamyatin.” In Critical Survey of Short Fiction: Supplement. La Canada, California: Salem Press, 1987. 366–74.

  63. “The Russian Short Story 1880–1917.” In The Russian Short Story: A Critical History. Ed. Charles Moser. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986. 103–46.

a. Excerpt reprinted in Short Story Criticism, No. 28. Detroit: Gale Research, Inc., 1998.

  1. “The Structure and Imagery of Pushkin’s ‘Imitations of the Koran.’” In New Studies in Russian Language and Literature. Ed. Anna Lisa Crone and Catherine V. Chvany. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica, 1986. 59–72.

  2. “Nabokov and Dostoevski: The Case of Despair”. In Dostoevski and the Human Condition After a Century. Ed. Alexej Ugrinsky et al. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1986. 155–162.

  3. “Evgenii Zamyatin.” In Critical Survey of Fiction: Foreign Language Series. La Canada, California: Salem Press, 1984. 866–76.

  4. “Bunin’s Translations of Byron’s Dramas: A Writer’s Apprenticeship.” Russian Language Journal 38.129–30 (1984): 93–100. This article also appeared as a supplement to American Contributions to the Ninth International Congress of Slavists, Vol. II, Literature.

  5. “Mikhail Lermontov.” In Critical Survey of Poetry: Foreign Language Series. La Canada. California: Salem Press. Inc. 1984. 866–876.

  6. “Nabokov’s ‘Terra Incognita’ and Invitation to a Beheading: The Struggle for Imaginative Freedom.” Wiener Slawistischer Almanach 12 (1983): 55–65.

a. Republished as “‘Terra Incognita’ i Priglashenie na kazn' Nabokova: bor'ba za svobodu voobrazheniia.” Trans. T. Strelkova. In Nabokov: Pro et Contra. Lichnost' i tvorchestvo Vladimira Nabokova v otsenke russkikh i zarubezhnykh myslitelei i issledovatelei. Ed. B. Averin and M. Malikova. St. Petersburg: Izd. Russkogo Khristianskogo gumanitarnogo instituta. 1997. 354–63.

  1. “Nabokov and Zhukovsky.” The Vladimir Nabokov Research Newsletter 11 (1983): 43–47.

  2. “Through a Transforming Lens: Madness and Art in Nabokov’s Fiction.” Delta 17 (1983): 1–10.

  3. “The Function of Literary Allusion in Nabokov’s Despair.” Slavic and East European Journal 26.3 (Fall 1982): 302–313.

  4. “Ivan Bunin and the Middle East: A Poetic Encounter.” Russian Language Journal 36.123–24 (Winter–Spring 1982): 123–132.

a. Republished as “Ivan Bunin i Vostok: poeticheskaia vstrecha.” Trans. N. Beliachkova and K. Viktorovskaia. In Ivan Bunin: Pro et Contra. Lichnost' i tvorchestvo I. A. Bunina v otsenke russkikh i zarubezhnykh myslitelei i issledovatelei. Ed. B. Averin et al. St. Petersburg: Izd. Russkogo Khristianskogo gumanitarnogo instituta. 2001. 552–61.

  1. “Pnin: The Wonder of Recurrence and Transformation.” In Nabokov’s `Fifth Arc’: Nabokov and Others on His Life’s Work. Ed. Charles Nicol and J. E. Rivers. Austin: University of Texas Press. 1982. 195–210.

  2. “Medium and Message: Oral Utterances in Melkij bes.” Russian Literature 9.4 (1981): 357–68.

  3. “Desire and Renunciation: Buddhist Elements in the Prose of Ivan Bunin.” Canadian Slavonic Papers 23.1 (Spring 1981): 11–20. Excerpts reprinted in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Edited by Sharon K Hall. Detroit: Gale Research Co., 1982.

  4. “A Note on the Name ‘Pnin.’” The Vladimir Nabokov Research Newsletter 6 (1981): 32–33.

  5. “Bunin’s ‘Petlistye ushi’: The Deformation of a Byronic Rebel.” Canadian-American Slavic Studies 14.1 (1980): 52–61.

  6. “The Real Life of Zhorzhik Uranski.” The Vladimir Nabokov Research Newsletter 4 (1980): 35–37.

  7. With Catherine V. Chvany, ‘Three Unpublished Letters of Ivan Bunin to N. P. Vakar.” Russian Language Journal 34.118 (1980): 155–161.

  8. “A Modernist’s Palette: Color in the Prose Fiction of Evgenij Zamjatin.” Russian Language Journal 33.115 (1979): 82–98.

  9. “The Theme of Duality in Sologub’s Tvorimaja legenda.” Die Welt der Slaven 19–20 (1974–1975): 25–36.



Book Reviews and Review Essays


  1. Bunin i Nabokov: Istoriia sopernichestva, by Maksim Shraer [Shrayer]. Slavic Review 74.3 (2015): 673–74.

  2. Lolita: The Story of a Cover Girl. Vladimir Nabokov’s Novel in Art and Design, ed. John Bertram and Yuri Leving. Slavic and East European Journal 58.2 (Summer 2014): 343–44.

  3. Nabokov’s Theatrical Imagination, by Siggy Frank. Modern Language Review 108.4 (2013). 1335–36.

  4. Anatomy of a Short Story: Nabokov’s Puzzles, Codes, “Signs and Symbols,” ed. Yuri Leving. Russian Review 72.2 (2013): 318–19.

  5. Nabokov, Perversely, by Eric Naiman. Canadian Slavonic Papers 53.1 (2011): 159–60.

  6. The Quill and the Scalpel: Nabokov’s Art and the Worlds of Science, by Stephen H. Blackwell. Slavic and East European Journal 53.4 (2010): 366–67.

  7. The Original of Laura (Dying is Fun), by Vladimir Nabokov (edited by Dmitri Nabokov). Magill Book Reviews. Published online at MagillOnLiteraturePlus and Literary Reference Center, hosted by EBSCOhost.

  8. Transitional Nabokov, ed. Will Norman and Duncan White. Slavic and East European Journal 53.4 (2010): 537–38.

  9. How the Russians Read the French: Lermontov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, by Priscilla Meyer. Slavonica 16.1 (2010): 44.

  10. Dostoevsky’s Greatest Characters: A New Approach to “Notes from the Underground,” Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov, by Bernard J. Paris. Slavic and East European Journal 53.4 (2009): 663–65.

  11. Style is Matter: The Moral Art of Vladimir Nabokov, by Leland de la Durantaye. Slavic Review 68.1 (2009): 196–97.

  12. Narrative, Space and Gender in Russian Fiction: 1846–1903, Joe Andrew. Slavic and East European Journal 52.2 (2008): 289–91.

  13. A Devil’s Vaudeville: The Demonic in Dostoevsky’s Major Fiction, ed. W. J. Leatherbarrow. Canadian-American Slavic Studies 41.4 (2007): 470–72.

  14. Dostoevsky’s Polyphonic Talent, ed. Joe E. Barnhart. Slavic and East European Journal 50.2 (2006): 326–28.

  15. Fiction’s Overcoat: Russian Literary Culture and the Question of Philosophy, by Edith Clowes. Partial Answers 3.1 (2005): 163–68.

  16. Nabokov’s World. 2 vols., ed. Jane Grayson, Arnold McMillin, and Priscilla Meyer. Slavic Review 62.2 (2003): 421–23.

  17. Zena’s Paradox: The Figured Reader in Nabokov’s Gift, by Stephen H. Blackwell. Russian Review 60.3 (2001). 431.

  18. Dostoevsky’s “The Idiot”: A Critical Companion, ed. Liza Knapp. Slavic Review 58.4 (1999): 937–38.

  19. The World of Nabokov’s Stories, by Maxim D. Shrayer. Russian Review 58.4 (1999): 693–94.

  20. Russian Women’s Shorter Fiction: An Anthology 18351860, ed. Joe Andrew. Slavic and East European Review 41.3 (1997): 501–3.

  21. Telling Silence: Russian Frame Naratives of Renunciation, by Charles Isenberg. Slavic and East European Journal 41.2 (1997): 358–59.

  22. Readings in Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century, ed. Sandra F. Rosengrant and Elena D. Lifschitz. The Modern Language Journal 81.1 (1997): 139–40.

  23. The Magician’s Doubts: Nabokov and the Risks of Fiction, by Michael Wood. Magill’s Book Reviews. Dow-Jones Retrieval System, 1996.

  24. The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov, by Vladimir Nabokov. Magill’s Literary Annual 1996. Vol. 2. Pasadena: Salem Press, 1996. 724–27.

  25. Ivan Bunin: Russian Requiem, 18851920. A Portrait from Letters, Diaries, and Fiction, by Thomas Gaiton Marullo. Slavic and East European Journal 38.2 (Summer 1994): 377–79.

  26. Alien Tongues: Bilingual Russian Writers of the “First” Emigration, by Elizabeth Klosty Beaujour. Canadian-American Slavic Studies 27.1–4 (1993): 369–71.

  27. Vladimir Nabokov. The American Years, by Brian Boyd. Slavic and East European Journal 36.4 (1992): 514–16.

  28. Bohin Manor, by Tadeusz Konwicki. Magill’s Literary Annual 1991. Vol. 1. Pasadena: Salem Press. 86–90.

  29. The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova. Magill’s Literary Annual 1991. Vol. 1 Pasadena: Salem Press, 1991. 165–69.

  30. Pasternak’s “Doctor Zhivago”, by Angela Livingstone. The Modern Language Review 86.2 (1992): 544.

  31. Text and Context, Essays to Honor Nils Åke Nilsson. Slavic and East European Journal 34.1 (1990): 99–100.

  32. Pasternak’s Novel: Perspectives on ‘Doctor Zhivago,’ by Neil Cornwell. The Modern Language Review 84.2 (1989): 539–40.

  33. Problems of Nabokov’s Poetics: A Narratological Analysis, by Pekka Tammi. The Modern Language Review 82.4 (1987): 1052–53.

  34. Worlds in Regression. Some Novels of Vladimir Nabokov, by D. Barton Johnson. Slavic and East European Journal 30.2 (1986): 295–97.

  35. The Burn, by Vassily Aksyonov. Magill’s Literary Annual 1985. Vol. 1. Englewood Cliffs. N.J.: Salem Press, 1985. 68–73.

  36. The Novels of Vladimir Nabokov, by Laurie Clancy. Slavic Review 45.1 (1986): 165–166.

  37. Metropol. Literary Almanac. Magill’s Literary Annual 1984. Vol. 2. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Salem Press, 1984. 533–38.

  38. Vladimir Nabokov. A Critical Study of the Novels, by David Rampton. Russian Review 45.2 (1986): 221.

  39. Fiction and Drama in Eastern and Southeastern Europe, edited by Henrik Birnbaum and Thomas Eekman. Russian Language Journal 38.129–30 (1984): 293–95.

  40. The Doubles. Fantastic Stories, by Vladimir Mikhanovsky. The Modern Language Journal 67.3 (Autumn 1983): 305–6.

  41. An Anthology of Russian Neo-Realism: The “Znanie” School of Maxim Gorky, translated and edited by Nicholas Luker. The Modern Language Journal 67.1 (1983): 92.

  42. Ivan Bunin. A Study of His Fiction, by James B. Woodward. Slavic and East European Journal 25.1 (1981): 101–3.

  43. Complete Short Stories by Andrei Bely, translated and introduced by Ronald Peterson. The Modern Language Journal 65.1 (1981): 81–82.

  44. Chekhov’s Art of Writing: A Collection of Critical Essays, edited by Paul Debreczeny and Thomas Eekman. The Modern Language Journal 63.5–6 (1979): 319.

  45. Nabokov: The Dimensions of Parody, by Dabney Stuart. South Atlantic Bulletin 44.4 (1979): 66–67.

  46. Poèzija Bunina. Ètjudy, by V. V. Nefedov. Slavic and East European Journal 22.1 (1978): 87–88.



Miscellaneous


  1. Articles on Fedor Dostoevsky’s The Gambler, Poor Folk, and The Possessed; Nikolai Gogol’s Dead Souls and “The Overcoat”; and Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull in Cyclopedia of Literary Places. Ed. R. Baird Shuman. 3 vols. Pasadena: Salem Press, 2003.

  2. Revision of article entitled “Russian Long Fiction” for Critical Survey of Long Fiction, Second Revised Edition, ed. Carl Rollyson (Pasadena: Salem Press, 2000).

  3. Articles on Nikolay Gogol’s collection, Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka, and on Vladimir Nabokov’s novels, The Defense and Despair, for the Reference Guide to Russian Literature, ed. Neil Cornwell (London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 1998), pp. 332–33, 564–66.

  4. Two articles (with annotated bibliography) on Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment. In Exploring Novels. CD-ROM Edition. Gale Research Inc., 1997. Published online on Answers.com at

  5. Articles on The Cowards, The Defense, The Double, The Gift, Mary, The Memorandum. In Cyclopedia of Literary Characters II. Edited by Frank N. Magill. Pasadena: Salem Press, 1990. 349–50, 384–85, 419–20, 581–82, 981–82, 995–96.

  6. Review Essays on Anton Chekhov’s “The Gentleman from San Francisco,” “Gusev,” “The Lady with the Dog,” “The Man in a Case,” “Twenty-six Men and a Girl,” “Ward No. 6,” for Masterplots II. Short Stories. Edited by Frank N. Magill. Pasadena, California: Salem Press, 1986.

  7. Introduction to ‘The Final Martyrs’ by Valeri Briusov, translated by V. Wozniuk. Virginia Literary Review 1.2 (1979): 29.



PAPERS AND LECTURES


  1. “Showing, Not Telling?: Visual vs.Verbal Means of Communication in Dostoevsky.” Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies National Meeting, Philadelphia, November 2015.

  2. “Nabokov’s Male Narrators and the Women They Desire.” 65th Annual Mountain Interstate Foreign Language Conference, Charleston SC, October 2015.

  3. “Portraits of the Patriarchy in Dostoevsky’s Early Fiction.” International Council for Central and East European Studies Ninth International Conference, Makuhari, Japan, August 2015.

  4. The Brothers Karamazov: A Conversation with Professor Julian Connolly.” Duke University, April 15, 2015.

  5. “We All Came Out of Gogol’s Overcoat.” A lecture on Gogol prepared for the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library “Big Read” Program, March 16, 2015.

  6. “From Russia to America: The Depiction of Nationality in Nabokov’s Work.” Western Association for Slavic Studies Annual Meeting. Albuquerque, April 2-5, 2014.

  7. Suddenness and Romantic Attachment in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.” Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Annual Conference, Boston, November 2013.

  8. “Cruel Wit: The Ethics of Humor in Vladimir Nabokov’s Fiction.” XV International Congress of Slavists. Minsk, Belarus, August 2013.

  9. “From The Brothers Karamazov to The Brothers K: Dostoevsky’s Last Novel and Modern American Fiction.” XV International Dostoevsky Symposium. Moscow, Russian Federation, July 2013.

  10. “Fluid Spaces, Illusive Identities: Nabokov’s Depiction of France in the Late 1930s.” Presented at “Nabokov et la France,” International Colloquium on Nabokov. Paris, France, May 2013.

  11. “From Russia to America: The Depiction of Nationality in Nabokov’s Work.” Symposium entitled “From Russia With Love,” Rochester Institute of Technology, April 2013.

  12. “The Image of the Father in Russian Literature and Culture.” Lecture presented at Brigham Young University, March 2013.

  13. “How Nabokov Reads Dostoevsky,” Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies National Conference, New Orleans, November 2012

  14. “The Shock of the Unexpected: Love and Desire in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.” International conference on “The Novel and Theories of Love,” Hebrew University of Jerusalem, June 2012.

  15. “Restoration or Regression?: The Lure of the Past in Vladimir Nabokov’s Fiction.” Nabokov Upside Down: International Vladimir Nabokov Conference. Auckland, NZ, January 2012.

  16. “The Cruelty (and Rewards) of Humor in Vladimir Nabokov’s Fiction.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies. Alexandria, Virginia, April 2011.

  17. Interview for program on “Vladimir Nabokov’s Russia” for Russian BookWorld, a program of Voice of Russia, April 2011. Online at http://english.ruvr.ru/radio_broadcast/28742746/49263741.html

  18. “The Ethical Implications of Narrative Point of View in Dostoevsky’s The Double.” Fourteenth International Dostoevsky Symposium, Naples, Italy, June 2010.

  19. “Nabokov Revising Nabokov: The Lolita Screenplays.” 2010 International Nabokov Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, March 2010.

  20. “Who Was Dolly Haze?” Fourth International Vladimir Nabokov Symposium, St. Petersburg, Russia, June 2009.

  21. “The Image of the Father in Russian Culture.” Inaugural lecture of the Elizabeth N. Neatrour Lectures in Russian Studies, James Madison University, October 2008.

  22. “The Middle Path: Berberova between Bunin and Nabokov.” XIV International Congress of Slavists, Macedonia, September 2008.

  23. “Dostoevsky's Guide to Spiritual Epiphany in The Brothers Karamazov.” International Dostoevsky Symposium, Budapest, Hungary, July 2007.

  24. “The Challenge of Interpreting and Decoding Nabokov: Strategies and Suggestions.” Third International Vladimir Nabokov Colloquium, Nice, France, June 2006.

  25. “Nabokov, Pushkin, and Eugene Onegin.” 21st-Century Center of Excellence Seminar on Translation, Kyoto, Japan, December 2005.

  26. “Decoding Nabokov: The Real Life of Sebastian Knight.” The Nabokov Society of Japan, Kyoto University, December 2005.

  27. “The Problem of the Father in Russian Culture and Society.” Chuo University (Tokyo), December 2005.

  28. “The Role of the Rusalka in Russian Literature.” Tokyo University, December 2005.

  29. “Nabokov’s Dostoevsky: From Dreamers to Deviants.” International Dostoevsky Symposium, Geneva, Switzerland, September 2004.

  30. “Why are Nymphets ‘Demonic’?” American Literature Association Annual Conference, San Francisco, March 2004.

  31. “Metamorphosis of a Dreamer: From Dostoevsky’s ‘White Nights’ to Nabokov’s The Eye.” 13th Annual Congress of Slavists, Ljubljana, Slovenia, August 2003.

  32. “Decoding Nabokov: The Real Life of Sebastian Knight.” University of Georgia, Athens, GA, March 2003.

  33. “The Elemental Nabokov: The Role of Natural Elements in Nabokov’s Fiction.” International Vladimir Nabokov Symposium, St. Petersburg, Russia, July 2002.

  34. “Death in Strange Lands: Berberova, Bunin, Nabokov.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Annual Conference, Daytona Beach, Florida, March 2002.

  35. “Black and White and Dead All Over: Color Imagery in Nabokov’s Prose.” Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association, New Orleans, December 2001.

  36. “Fluid Identities and Hazardous Substitutions in Dostoevsky’s The Gambler.” XI Symposium of the International Dostoevsky Society, Baden-Baden, Germany, October 2001.

  37. “Three Visions of Personal Dignity: Berberova, Bunin, Nabokov.” International Berberova Colloquium, Arles, France, October 2001.

  38. “Pushkin and the Spirit of Seduction.” Duke University, April 2001.

  39. “Revelation and Renunciation in Gogol’s ‘Vii’.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Annual Conference, Alexandria,Virginia, March 2001.

  40. “The Quest for Self-Discovery in Gogol’s ‘Vii.’” Sixth International Council for Central and East European Studies World Conference, Tampere, Finland, August 2000.

  41. “The Flight of Daedalus and Icarus in the Work of Vladimir Nabokov.” Vladimir Nabokov International Centennial Conference, Cambridge, England, July 1999.

  42. “Vladimir Nabokov and the Creative Legacy of F. M. Dostoevsky.” International Conference on V. V. Nabokov in Russian and World Literature, Moscow, Russia, April 1999.

  43. “Nabokov and Dostoevsky: From Mary to Lolita.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Richmond, Virginia, March 1999.

  44. “‘Broken to Bits’: Nabokov Rewrites Dostoevsky.” Vladimir Nabokov Centenary Festival, Cornell University, September 1998.

  45. “A New ‘Spirit of Negation’: Danilov the Violist and the Image of the Devil in World Literature.” Twelfth International Congress of Slavists, Cracow, Poland, August 1998.

  46. “Points of Tension in Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment.” Presentation at two Advanced Placement English classes at Woodberry Forest Preparatory School, February 1998.

  47. “Cultural Icons in Conflict: Lolita and ‘The Gentle Creature.’” Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association, Toronto, December 1997.

  48. “Nabokov’s Dialogue with Dostoevsky: Lolita and ‘Krotkaia.’” Annual Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Association of Slavic Studies, Albuquerque, April 1997.

  49. “The ‘Flutter of Fantasy’ in Vladimir Nabokov’s Early Fiction.” International Nabokov Colloquium, Paris, France, November 1996.

  50. “Spirits and Sprites in the Early Stories of Vladimir Nabokov.” Rocky Mountain Association of Slavic Studies Annual Conference, Sparks, Nevada, April 1996.

  51. “Cincinnatus and Différance: Subversive Discourse in Invitation to a Beheading.” International Colloquium on Vladimir Nabokov, Nice, France, June 1995.

  52. “The ‘Author-Hero’ Relationship in Vladimir Nabokov’s Fiction: A Bakhtinian Perspective.” Seventh International Bakhtin Conference, Moscow, Russia, June 1995.

  53. “Gogol’s Magic Circle: Narrative Defenses Against the Demonic in the Dikanka Tales.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, San Diego, December 1994.

  54. “An Afternoon with Vladimir Nabokov.” Governor’s Academy, James Madison University, Summer 1994.

  55. “`Nature’s Reality’ or ‘Humbert’s Fancy’?: Scenes of Reunion and Murder in Lolita.” American Literature Association Annual Conference, San Diego, June 1994.

  56. “`Who’s Who in Humbertland: Creation of Identity in Lolita.” National Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Honolulu, November 1993.

  57. “Vladimir Nabokov—Russian-American Writer.” Governor’s Academy, James Madison University, Summer 1993.

  58. “Nabokov and Narrative Point of View.” National Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Phoenix, November 1992.

  59. “From Biography to Autobiography and Back: The Fictionalization of the Narrated Self.” International Colloquium on Vladimir Nabokov, Nice, France, June 1992.

  60. “Soviet Film: Recent Perspectives and Outlook.” Presentation at the Governor’s Academy, James Madison University, Summer 1992.

  61. “Nabokov and the Fiction of Self-Begetting.” Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association, San Francisco, December 1991.

  62. “The Power Behind the Throne: Author and Character in Nabokov’s King, Queen, Knave.” National Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Miami, November 1991.

  63. “Russian Translations of Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.” University of Virginia, September 1991.

  64. Presentation on Soviet film for seminar on “The Soviet Union in Turmoil.” University of Virginia, November 1991.

  65. “Nabokov and the Fiction of Self-Begetting.” Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association. San Francisco, December 1991.

  66. “Contemporary Developments in Soviet Film.” Presentation in a seminar entitled “The Soviet Union in Crisis,” University of Virginia, June 1991.

  67. “Contemporary East European Literature and Film.” Seminar for Community College Faculty. Tidewater Community College, Portsmouth, Virginia, July 1990.

  68. “The Gaze of the Other in Nabokov’s Russian Fiction.” International Nabokov Conference, Moscow, U.S.S.R, May 1990.

  69. “Nabokov’s Invitation to a Beheading: The Narrator Interrogated.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., December 1989.

  70. “Author or Character: The Quest for Identity in Nabokov’s Fiction.” Twenty-Eighth Annual Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1989.

  71. “Nabokov and Gogol: Evidence in The Defense.” American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Twentieth National Convention, Honolulu, Hawaii, November 1988.

  72. “Vladimir Nabokov and the Legacy of Nikolai Gogol.” Southeast Conference on Foreign Languages and Literatures, Winter Park, Florida, February 1988.

  73. Lolita, Butterflies, and Cosmic Synchronization.” University of Virginia, December, 1987.

  74. “Valery Briusov’s The Fiery Angel: By Love Possessed.” Pacific Northwest Council on Foreign Languages Annual Meeting, Seattle, May, 1987.

  75. “‘Through a Glass Darkly’: Perception and Delusion in Nabokov’s Prose.” Given at conference entitled “The Legacy of Vladimir Nabokov: A Conference Commemorating The Tenth Anniversary of His Death.” Yale University, New Haven, February 1987.

  76. “Briusov’s The Fiery Angel.” South Atlantic Modern Language Association, Annual Meeting, Atlanta, November, 1986.

  77. “Nabokov’s ‘The Thunderstorm’ and the Mock Epic.” Southeast Conference on Foreign Languages and Literatures, Winter Park, Florida, February 1986.

  78. “The Otherworldly in the Poetry of Vladimir Nabokov.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, Annual Meeting, Chicago, December 1985.

  79. “Delusions or Clairvoyance?: A Second Look at Madness in V. Nabokov’s Work.” Third World Congress for Soviet and East European Studies, Washington, D.C., October 1985.

  80. “Vladimir Nabokov’s Fictional Universe.” James Madison University, May 1985.

  81. “Nabokov and the Russian Symbolists.” Southeast Conference on Foreign Languages and Literatures, Winter Park, Florida, February, 1985.

  82. “Nikolaj Gogol' at the Metropol'.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., December 1984.

  83. “Madness and Art in Nabokov’s Fiction.” Harvard University, April 1984.

  84. “Nature and Spirituality in the Works of Anton Chekhov.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, Annual Meeting, New York, December 1983.

  85. “Madness and Doubling: From Dostoevsky’s The Double to Nabokov’s The Eye.” American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Fifteenth National Convention, Kansas City, October 1983.

  86. “Bunin’s Translations of Byron’s Dramas: A Poetic Apprenticeship.” Ninth International Congress of Slavists, Kiev, U.S.S.R., September 1983.

  87. “Nabokov’s ‘Terra Incognita’ and Invitation to a Beheading.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, December 1982.

  88. “Ivan Bunin and the Realist Tradition.” International Symposium on Russian Realism 1880–1920, Northwestern University, October 1982.

  89. “The Fusion of Art and Memory: Ivan Bunin’s Triumph Over Oblivion.” Tenth Annual Conference on Twentieth-Century Literature, Louisville, Kentucky, February 1982.

  90. “To Live for the Moment: Ivan Bunin’s Late Love Stories.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, New York, New York, December 1981.

  91. “Russian Voices in Nabokov’s Despair.” American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Thirteenth National Convention, Monterey, California, September 1981.

  92. “Nabokov and Dostoevski: The Case of Despair.” International Dostoevski Symposium. Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York, April 1981.

  93. Zhizn' Arsen'eva: The Victory of Art Over Death.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, Houston, Texas, December 1980.

  94. “Language as Medium and Message in Sologub’s Melkij bes.” Second World Congress for Soviet and East European Studies, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Federal Republic of Germany, October 1980.

  95. “The Middle East in Bunin’s Poetry.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Nineteenth Annual Meeting, College Park, Maryland, September 1980.

  96. “Sense and Nonsense: The Language of Melkij bes.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies. Eighteenth Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, October 1979.

  97. “‘The Night of Renunciation’: Aspects of Bunin’s Prose in the Twenties.” American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Annual Meeting, New York, New York, December 1978.

  98. “Ivan Bunin and the Decadents.” Southern Conference on Slavic Studies, Seventeenth Annual Meeting, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, November 1978.

  99. “Color in the Prose Fiction of Evgenij Zamjatin.” American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Tenth National Convention, Columbus, Ohio, October 1978.

  100. “Bunin and Byron: The Theme of the Rebel.” Kentucky Foreign Language Conference. Lexington. Kentucky, April 1978.

  101. “Structures of Duality in Fedor Sologub’s Tvorimaja legenda.” New England Slavic Association, April 1978.



COURSES TAUGHT

University of Virginia 1977–present

(a) Undergraduate


USEM 171 Images of Fatherhood in Russian Culture

USEM 181 Defining Evil: The Russian Perspective

PAVS 4500 The Individual and the Community in European Fiction and Film

RUSS 201–202 Second-year Russian

RUSS 301–302 Third-year Russian

RUTR 2400 Masterpieces of Russian Literature

RUTR 2730 Dostoevsky and the Modern Novel

RUTR 3510 Dostoevsky

RUTR 3350 l9th-Century Russian Lit. in Translation

RUTR 336 20th-Century Russian Lit. in Translation

RUTR 346 Russian & East European Drama

RUTR 391 The Devil in Russian Lit.

RUTR 391 Contemporary East European Literature in Translation

RUTR 391 Russian & East European Film

RUTR 393Z Masterpieces of Russian Literature

RUTR 3400 Nabokov

RUSS 453S Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu

RUSS 492 Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu dvadtsatogo veka

SLTR 393Z Fiction into Film
(b) Graduate
RUSS 552/5510 Rise of the Russian Novel

RUSS 553 The Golden Age of Russian Poetry

RUSS 555/5176 The Silver Age of Russian Poetry

RUSS 5500 Nabokov and Russian Émigré Literature

RUSS 556 Soviet Literature

RUSS 558 Russian Prose from 1881–1917

RUSS 573/5500 Dostoevsky

RUSS 575/5750 Russian Poetry

RUSS 592 The Female Protagonist in Russian Literature

RUSS 701 Proseminar in Russian Literature

RUSS 729 Old Russian Literature

RUSS 732 Gogol

RUSS 773 The Brothers Karamazov

RUSS 793 Nabokov



Harvard University 1973–1977 Teaching Fellow, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Slavic 150 Survey of Russian Literature

Slavic 155 Dostoevsky

Slavic 157 Tolstoy

Sophomore Tutorial in Russian Literature

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS AND SERVICE

National and International
Member of American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, Modern Language Association, Southern Conference on Slavic Studies

President, International Vladimir Nabokov Society, 1988–1989, 2008–2009.

Vice President, International Vladimir Nabokov Society, 1986–1987, 2006–2007

Member, Executive Committee, International Vladimir Nabokov Society, 1989–1998, 2010–present

President, Nikolai Gogol Society, 1987

Vice President, the Nikolai Gogol Society, 1986

Member, Executive Committee, Division on Slavic and East European Literatures, Modern Language Association, 2002–2004

Member, Editorial Board, Slavic and East European Journal, 1994–1999

Member, Publications Committee, American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, 1992–1996

Referee for PMLA, Russian Review, Slavic and East European Journal, Slavic Review, Slavonic and East European Review, Nabokov Studies, Mosaic, Studies in the Novel, Studies in Twentieth Century Literature, Canadian Slavonic Papers, Partial Answers, College Literature, Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, and the National Endowment for the Humanities

Editorial Consultant for Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, Penn State Press, Peter Lang Publishing, University of Florida Press, University of Washington Press, Yale University Press, McGill University Press, Palgrave Macmillan, Bloomsbury Publishing

Outside Consultant for promotion and tenure evaluations: Carleton University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Middlebury College, Northwestern University, Princeton University, University of Missouri, University of Rochester, University of Tennessee

Member of American Councils for International Education ACTR/ACCELS Research Scholar Selection Committee, 2001

Member of National Endowment for the Humanities evaluation panel for fellowships in Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, Literary Criticism, and Linguistics, 2001, 2002

Regional Representative, Delegate Assembly, Modern Language Association, 2002–2005

University of Virginia

Chair, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1988–1993, 2001–2011, 2015–2016 (Interim Chair)

Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1980–1988, 1998–2001

Undergraduate Advisor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1979–1980

Member, Faculty Senate, 1997–2005, 2013–2015

Member, Faculty Senate Executive Committee, 2000–2003

Member, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures Executive Council, 1996–1998

Member, Graduate Admissions Committee, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 2010–2011

Chair, Student-Faculty Advisory Committee, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1995–1996

Literature Curriculum Coordinator, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1977–1979, 1982–1993, 1994–2011.

Faculty Associate (Lower Division Faculty Advisor), College of Arts and Sciences, 1977–1979, 1986–1987, 1994–1998, 2004–2005, 2011–present

Member, Committee on Educational Policy and the Curriculum, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 2011–2015.

Member, Search Committee for Tenured Position in Creative Writing, Department of English, 2012–2013

Member, University of Virginia Language Center Planning Committee, 2010–2011

Member, USEMS Advisory Committee, 2002–2008

Member, University Committee on Fraternities and Sororities, 2003–2004

Faculty Secretary, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 1977–1978, 1980–1981

Coordinator of Third-year Russian, 1981–1984

Coordinator of Second-year Russian, 1977–1978, 1980–1981

Member, Faculty Committee on Special Programs, 1985–1989, 1994–1996

Chair, Faculty Committee on Special Programs, 1987–1988

Member, Executive Committee, Center for Russian and East European Studies, 1986–1993, 2001–present

Member, University Committee on Comparative Programs in Literature and Culture, 1988–2004

Member, Steering Committee, Interdisciplinary Program in Political and Social Thought, 1991–1993

Faculty Fellow, Brown College at Monroe Hill, 1986–1997

Faculty Honor Advisor, 1979–1986

Member, Phi Beta Kappa Book Award Committee, 2001

Member, University Self-Study Committee on Non-Traditional Students, 1994–1995

Member, University Team for MLA Teacher Education Project, 1995–1996.

Campus Representative, Cooperative Russian Language Program, Council on International

Educational Exchange, 1979–1980, 1989–1999

University Representative to Symposium on Funding for Foreign Languages and International

Studies in the 1980s, University of South Carolina, 1980

Harvard University

Resident Tutor in Slavic at Kirkland House

Member of House Fellowship Committee

Sponsor, Russian Table in Kirkland House and Literature Table in Kirkland House

Freshman Proctor and Resident Advisor, Harvard College

Member, Student-Faculty Committee in Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures



Revised: March 2016



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