Lib 509 Foundations of Library and Information Services



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KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY
KUTZTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA




DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

LIB 558 Librarian’s Role in Supporting Reading Strategies, 3 s.h., 3 c.h.


Summary of request
This course was offered during two summer sessions as a Selected Topics course. This request is to make it a course offered as an elective to graduate library science students or in-service librarians.

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY
KUTZTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY


  1. Course Description: LIB 558 Librarian’s Role in Supporting Reading Strategies, 3 s.h., 3 c.h.

This course examines the school librarian’s role in ensuring students’ reading success. The roles include the selection of materials that address the diverse needs of the learners including English as Second Language Learners, identification of resource materials that serve as tools for interactive think-alouds, and reinforcement of reading strategies within the information literacy curriculum. Prerequisite for course is LIB 575 Teaching Function of the School Library Media Center or an Instructional I certificate.


  1. Course Rationale

School librarians are an integral part in providing support as the districts strive to meet the literacy demands of the federal and state requirements. In order for the school librarians to be an effective contributor, they must be able to apply their knowledge of the reading process to the selection of materials that address the needs of the diverse learners. Additionally, school librarians play an important part in showing the connection between reading strategies and the ability to access and utilize information from various sources and in a variety of formats. This course provides the school librarian with the tools to be an integral part in ensuring student success in the ability to use information and be lifelong readers and learners.



  1. Course Objectives

    1. Relationship to Standards







PDE

ALA/

AASL


INTASC

ISTE

ALA

At the conclusion of the course the student will be able to:

Identify reading strategies within the information literacy curriculum.

IA,IE

2

1,7

II.A

II.3.4

II.3.5


Design informational literary lessons reinforcing reading strategies.

IA, IE

2

1,4,

II.A

II.3.4

II.3.5


Select materials based on readability or levels and format to meet the diverse needs of learners.

IC

4

2,3

II.C

V.C


II.3.4

II.3.5


Select instructional materials to support lessons dealing with literary elements, figurative language, and reading comprehension.

IA,IC, IE

2,4

1,3,7

II.C

II.3.4

II.3.5


Plan instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter and academic standards and anchor assessments and eligible content.

IIA

2

1

II.A II.C

11.3.4

Utilize standard readability formulas results or level codes to assist students or teachers in selecting appropriate materials to meet curricular or personal interest needs.

IID

2,4

1,2,3,6

II.C

II.3.4

Reflect on professional publications or resources to gain professional viewpoints

IIIA

3

9

V.A V.B

II.3.6

II.3.7


Collaborate with school colleagues to meet the student’s reading needs and content curriculums.

IIIC

2,3

6,10

V.D

II.3.1




    1. Relationship to Conceptual Framework

General Education

Through an introduction to a wide-range of reading resources, the student acquires a very broad general knowledge.

Content Specialization

Providing resources to diverse learners and teachers are key to content area of librarianship

Communication

Knowing how to communicate effectively through the use of reading terminology when collaborating with the reading specialist and teachers to meet the student’s reading needs

Scholarly Inquiry

Because information formats change continually and the expanding needs of the diverse learners, the student must have the ability and desire to keep abreast of changes.

Integration of Discipline

Knowing how to help patrons acquire information is a key lifelong learning skill.

Technology Integration

With information available in so many electronic formats, students must know how to help students use strategies to interrupt the information.




  1. Assessment

    1. Core Assignment (See attached)

    2. Other assessments based on a subset of the following:

      1. Reflection journals and papers

      2. Discussion forums

      3. Quizzes and exams

      4. Class attendance and participation




  1. Course Outline

    1. Course Outline Documentation

  1. Terminology for collaborative (library/classroom) partnerships

    1. Stages of reading development

    2. Components of balanced reading program




  1. Reading Formulas

    1. Types

    2. Book selection tools

    3. Collection development

    4. Reading guidance

    5. Online catalogs and databases




  1. Leveled Books

    1. Criteria

    2. Book selection tools

    3. Collection development

    4. Reading guidance

    5. Online catalogs and databases




  1. Resources for English as Second Learners

    1. Content

    2. Visual

    3. Language

    4. Genre




  1. Think-alouds

    1. Rationale

    2. Resources




  1. Resources for Reading Strategies

    1. Making connecting and building background knowledge

    2. Visualizing

    3. Questioning

    4. Predicting and inferring

    5. Determining main idea

    6. Using fix-up options

    7. Synthesizing




  1. Reading online text

    1. Differences

    2. Strategies




  1. Resource Materials

    1. Literary elements

    2. Figurative language




    1. Other Policies

1. Accommodations

Any student who has a need for accommodation based on the impact of a disability should privately contact the Director, Office of Service to Americans with Disabilities to discuss the specific situation as soon as possible. Contact the Director at 610-683-4108 in the Stratton Administration Building to coordinate reasonable accommodations


2. Academic Honesty

Any acts of academic dishonesty by students, such as plagiarism on written papers or cheating on exams, threaten to undermine the educational and ethical goals of the University for its students. Such violations are of the utmost seriousness. The goal of the following policy and procedures is to promote a climate of academic honesty for all individuals at the University (The Key, p. 47).








  1. Instructional Resources

Allen, J. (2004). Tools for teaching content literacy. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.


American Association of School Librarians, & Association for Educational Communication and Technology. (1998). Information power: Building partnership for learning. Chicago, IL : American Library Association.
Barringer, C. (2006, August/‌September). Teaching beginning reading strategies in the school library media center: a “how to” guide. Library Media Connection, 25(1), 34-35.
Beers, S., & Howell, L. (2003). Reading strategies for the content areas (Vol. 1). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Biancarosa, G., & Snow, C. E. (2004). Reading next- a vision for action and research in middle and high school library: a report to Carnegie Corporation of New York. Washington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education. Retrieved May 19, 2007, from http://www.all4ed.org
Block, C. C., & Israel, S. E. (2004, October). The ABCs of performing highly effective think-alouds. Reading Teacher, 58(2), 154-167.
Coiro, J. (2005, October). Making sense of online text. Educational Leadership, 63(2), 30-35.
Dzaldov, B. S. (2005, November). Book leveling and readers. Reader Teacher, 59(3), 222-229.
Elliott, C. (2000, November). Helping students weave their way through the World Wide Web. English Journal, 90(2), 87-94.
Fry, E. (2002, November). Readability versus leveling. Reading Teacher, 56(3), 286-291.
Grimes, S. (2004, May). The search for meaning. School Library Journal, 50(5), 48-52.
Grimes, S. (2006). Reading is our business: How libraries can foster reading comprehension. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.
Hall, S. (2002). Using picture storybooks to teach literacy devices (3rd ed.). Westport, CT: Oryx Press.
Harvey, S., & Goudvis, A. (2000). Strategies that work: Teaching comprehension to enhance understanding. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.
Henry, L. A. (2006, April). SEARHing for an answer: the critical role of new literacies while reading on the Internet. Reading Teacher, 59(7), 614-627.
Joyce, M. Z. (2006, April/‌May). A niche for library media specialist: Teaching students how to read informational texts. Library Media Connection, 24(7), 36-38.
Jurenka, N. A. (2005). Teaching phonemic awareness through children’s literature and experiences. Westport, CT: Teacher Idea Press.
Kindig, J. (2006, April/‌May). Here, there, and everywhere: Reading First in the library. Library Media Connection, 24(7), 28-30.
Krashen, S. (2004). The power of reading (2nd ed.). Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.
Leu, D. J., Jr., Castek, J., Henry, L. A., Coiro, J., & McMullan, M. (2004, February). The lessons that children teach us: Integrating children’s literature and the new literacies of the Internet. Reading Teacher, 57(5), 496-503.
Lewin, L. (1999, February). “Site reading” the world wide web. Educational Leadership, 56(5), 16-20.
Miller, D. (2002). Reading with meaning. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.
National Institute for Literacy. (2000). Report on the National Reading Panel: teaching children to read. Washington, DC: National Institute for Literacy.
Norton, T., & Land, B. L. (2004). Literacy strategies. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.
Partnership for Reading, National Institute for Literacy, & National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. (2001). Putting reading first: the research building block for teaching children to read. U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved May 19, 2007, from http://www.nifl.gov
Pinnell, G. S. (1999). Effective literacy programs. Council Connections. Retrieved May 19, 2007, from Reading Recovery Council Web site: http://www.rrcna.org/‌pdfs/‌ccv4no2.pdf
Ray, K. (1999). Wondrous words. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.
Roser, N. G., & Martinez, M. G. (2005). What a character? Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
Sutherland-Smith, W. (2002, April). Weaving the literacy Web: Changes in reading from page to screen. Reading Teacher, 55(7), 662-670.
Tyner, B. (2004). Small-group reading instruction: a differentiated teaching model for beginning and struggling readers. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
Tyner, B., & Green, S. (2005). Small-group reading instruction: a differentiated teaching model for intermediate readers, grades 3-8. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
Vardell, S. M., Hadaway, N. L., & Young, T. A. (2006, May). Matching books and readers: Selecting literature for English learners. Reading Teacher, 59(8), 734-741.
Walker, B. (2005, April). Thinking aloud: Struggling readers often require more than a model. Reading Teacher, 58(7), 688-692.
Walker, C., & Shaw, S. (2004). Teaching reading strategies in the school library. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.
Wihelm, J. D. (2002). Action strategies for deepening comprehension. New York: Scholastic.
Wilhelm, J. D. (2001). Improving comprehension with think-aloud strategies. New York: Scholastic.
Wilhelm, J. D. (2001, November/‌December). Think-alouds. Instructor, 111(4), 26.
Wilhelm, J. D. (2004). Reading is seeing. New York: Scholastic.
Zimmerman, N. P. (2005, May). Research-based evidence: the role of the library media specialist in reading instruction. School Library Media Activities Monthly, 21(9), 47-50.
Zimmerman, S., & Hutchins, C. (2001). 7 keys to comprehension: How to help your kids read it and get it! New York: Three Rivers Press.
KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY
KUTZTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

CORE ASSIGNMENT



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

LIB 558: Librarian’s Role in Supporting Reading Strategies
Description of core assignment:
Write a reflection on how you would incorporate reading strategies into the information literacy curriculum in order to improve student achievement. Base your reflection on the lectures, articles, reading from text and class discussion.
Components:

  • Personal reflection on the role of librarian in supporting reading strategies

  • Cite at least three specific examples of how you plan to incorporate reading strategies into the information literacy curriculum.

    • Criteria for the examples

      • Address at least three different grade level groups

        • K-1

        • 2-3

        • 3-4

        • 5-6

        • 7-8

        • 9-10

        • 11-12

      • Address the three different components of the curriculum

        • Book selection

        • Literature Component

        • Research Component







Target

Acceptable

Unacceptable




2

1

0

Part 1: Content


- Includes a clear concise explanation of how the strategies would be implemented into instructional practice

-Displays a strong evidence of reflection and synthesis of ideas presented in lecture, readings, and discussion

-Shows understanding of content

-Appropriate use of terminology

-Includes examples from personal experiences to support or refute a point of view


-Includes an explanation of how the strategies would be implemented into instructional practice but at times it is not clear

-Relevant to readings and but lacks reflection and synthesis of ideas presented in lecture, readings, and discussion

-Shows some understanding of content

-Utilizes correct bibliographic format for each suggested resources

-Includes examples from personal experiences but lacks details to support or refute a point of view


-Fails to relate a knowledge of the topic

-Demonstrates a lack of understanding of the content

-Lacks correct bibliographic format

-Identifies resources but do not support the strategy of summarizing

-Lacks identification of grade level


Part 2: Format and Organization


-Consistently utilized professional vocabulary and writing style

-Follows a logical organization

-Accurately cites all sources of information in appropriate format

-Follows guidelines in regards to length, spacing and font



-Mostly utilized professional vocabulary and writing style

-Follows a logical organization throughout most of the paper

-Accurately cites most of sources of information in appropriate format

-Follows all but one of the guidelines in regards to length, spacing and font



-Lacks professional vocabulary and writing style

-Lacks a logical organization

-Fails to cite sources

-Fails to follow guidelines in regards to length, spacing and font





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