Revisiting elisabeth kubler-ross: pastoral and clinical implications of the death and dying stage model in the caring process



Yüklə 138,19 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix30.09.2017
ölçüsü138,19 Kb.
#2453


 

REVISITING ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: 



PASTORAL AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE 

DEATH AND DYING STAGE MODEL IN THE CARING PROCESS 

 

By 


Jesús Rodríguez Sánchez, Ph.D. 

Professor in Pastoral Theology, Personality and Culture 

Inter-American University of Puerto Rico Metropolitan Campus 

(Kálathos 1, no. 1, 5-10/2007) 

   

 

 



During the last centuries, different events and circumstances have intensified research-

ers' interest in studying the human experience of death and dying. A significant event in 

1941, a fire in which 300 persons died at the Coconut Grove night club in Boston, per-

suaded Erich Lindeman

1

  to study the experience of grief among surviving family members.   



Later during the 1960's, as cancer became the leading cause of death among Americans, 

authors  like  Elizabeth  Kübler-Ross  (1926-2004)

2

  became  a  leading  figure  in  unveiling 



death from the prevailing taboos of the time. Most recently, AIDS as the new global illness 

has generated a fresh new interest in understanding the experience of dying. 

 

Two distinct areas of study have led research in this field.



3

  One is the biomedical per-

spective, which includes sciences such as thanatology and pathology. The other is the psy-

chosocial perspective, represented primarily by the fields of psychology, sociology, theology 

and psychiatry. Together, these fields conduct research seeking to understand how humans 

cope and respond emotionally, socially and spiritually to the experience of dying.     

 

This article will explore some of the studies produced from the psychosocial perspective, 



only. My interest in the topic of death and dying will be limited to examining Kübler-Ross' 

stages of death model. I have chosen her work for one basic reason. Having arrived to Puerto 

Rico after years doing clinical work abroad, it was surprising to me that her theory continues 

to be a dominant theoretical framework used by the pastoral caregivers engaged in under-

standing the patient's dying experience. To a certain extent, Kübler-Ross' model or theory 

seems to be the rubric by which most arrive at their theological and pastoral care decisions. 

In  my  work  experience,  this  issue  did  not  come  as  a  surprise.  Already  I  was  aware  that, 

amidst scholarly critique to Kübler-Ross' work, the model had greatly influenced most dis-

ciplines and had prevailed. To find some answers to this dilemma, the next following dis-

cussion will focus on understanding the basic axioms of Kübler-Ross' theory and the pas-

toral and clinical implications in the caring process.   

 

 



 

                                                 

1

Erich Lindeman, “Symptomatology and Management of Acute Grief,” 



American Journal of Psychiatry

 101 


(1944): 141-149. 

2

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, 



On Death and Dying: What the Dying Have to Teach Doctors, Nurses, Clergy, and 

Their Own Families

 (New York: McMillan Co., 1969). 

3

For  a  complete  survey  of  the  development  and  direction  of  Thanatology  literature  see:  Samuel  Southard, 



Death

 and Dying: A Bibliographical Survey

 (New York: Greenwood Press, 1991).     



 

Genesis of Kübler-Ross Stage Model Theory 



 

 

At popular levels, people relate, and usually limit their understanding of  Kübler-Ross 



work to the first part of the title of her book, 

"On Death and Dying." However, it is in the 

less notorious subtitle of her work, "

What the Dying Have to Teach Doctors, Nurses, Clergy 

and Their Own Families," where one can find a better summary of the intentions and mo-

tivations of her book. The subtitle suggests that Kübler-Ross' attempt was to increase care-

givers' and health care providers' levels of sensitivity and awareness concerning the dying 

person's needs. In her words, "We have asked him [the patient] to be our teacher so that we 

may learn more about the final stages of life with all its anxieties, fears, and hopes."

4

  With 



that purpose in mind, and after her research on the subject, she proposed a five stage model 

in order to facilitate our understanding of the patient's experiences during the dying pro-

cess.   

 

The stages are: denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.    Alt-



hough she clearly states that the stages are not rigid and they will last for different periods 

and will replace each other or exist at times side by side,

5

  the way she articulates her theory 



is not consistent with the graph she produced to present the model. For that reason, alt-

hough one can read in her description of the stages the non-progressive aspect of her theory, 

one can also see in the visual design of her model the interconnected and ascendant aspects 

of her theory. Clearly this aspect suggested the perceived concept of a sequential progres-

sion, whether this was her intention or not. The following table represents the model as 

proposed in her book.

6

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



                                                 

4

Kübler-Ross, 



On Death and Dying

, xi. 


5

Kübler-Ross, 

On Death and Dying

, 139. 


6

Ibid., 264. 




 

Kübler-Ross: Dying Stages Model 



 

Time

Death 


Bargaining

Shock


Awareness of

fatal illness

PG = Preparatory Grief

PD = Partial Denial 

Depression

P.G.


Anger

Denial


P.D.

    Hope


Decathexis

Accep


t

ance


1

2  

3

4

5

-"Stages" of Dying-

 

 

 



 

Kübler-Ross explains that she developed her model as a result of her "experiment," with 

over two hundred terminally ill patients. Concerning the genesis of her study, she states:   

 

In the fall of 1965 four theology students of the Chicago Theological Seminary ap-



proached me for assistance in a research project... Their class was to write a paper on 

"crisis in human life," and the four students considered death as the biggest crisis 

people had to face.

7

     



 

 

This request motivated her to engage with the students in the study of the dying at the 



University of Chicago Hospital. Indications of both the extension of her research and her 

research protocol are not clear in her book. 

 

 

The Death and Dying Stages: A Review 



 

 

1. Denial and Isolation. Kübler-Ross states that, "Among the over two hundred patients 



interviewed, most reacted to the awareness of a terminal illness at first with the statement, 

"No, not me, it cannot be true!" The patients, she argues, made use of denial not only in 

the initial stages of their illness, but in later periods also. Hence, denial “... functions as a 

buffer after unexpected shocking news, allows the patient to collect himself and, with time, 

                                                 

7

Kübler-Ross, 



On Death and Dying

, 21. 



 

mobilize other, less radical defenses."



8

  Eventually, she states, "Denial is usually a tempo-

rary defense and will soon be replaced by partial acceptance."

9

 



 

 

2. Anger. This is the substituting stage to denial. From her perspective, "When the first 



stage of denial cannot be maintained any longer, it is replaced by feelings of anger, rage, 

envy, and resentments."

10

  This stage is distinguished from denial in the fact that patient's 



displace their feelings of anger toward medical staff, family, the physician, onto the envi-

ronment, etc.

11

  Kübler-Ross suggest that since the patient's reasoning to be angry may be 



irrational, the patient's anger, when cast on to others, should not be taken personally. 

 

    3. Bargaining. From her point of view, although this stage is not well known, it is equally 



helpful to patients, at least for brief periods of time. During this stage, states Kübler-Ross: 

 

If we have been unable to face the sad facts in the first period and have been angry 



at people and God in the second phase, maybe we can succeed in entering into some 

sort of an agreement which postpone the inevitable happening: If God has decided 

to take us from this earth and he did not respond to my angry pleas, he may be more 

favorable if I ask nicely.

12

     


 

 

From her perspective, this stage could be related to children first demanding, then ask-



ing for a favor. In that sense, patients who are in the stage of bargaining may use the same 

maneuvers. In her words:   

 

He [the patient] knows, from past experiences, that there is a slim chance that he 



may be rewarded for good behavior and be granted a wish for special services. His 

wish is most always an extension of life, followed by the wish for a few days without 

pain or physical discomfort.

13

 



 

 

In Kübler-Ross' conception, the bargaining stage is a period of negotiation with a higher 



being. She describes this aspect of bargaining by suggesting that: 

 

  ...[bargaining] is really an attempt to postpone; it has to include a prize offered "for 



good behavior," it also sets a self-imposed "deadline (i.e., one more chance to per-

form on stage, the chance to attend the son's wedding), and it includes an implicit 

promise that the patient will not ask for more if this one postponement is granted.

14

 



 

 

 



                                                 

8

Ibid., 39. 



9

Ibid., 39. 

10

Ibid., 50. 



11

Ibid., 52. 

12

Ibid., 82. 



13

Ibid., 82-83. 

14

Ibid., 83-84. 




 

 



4. Depression. Two distinct aspects of depression are made in this stage, the reactive, 

and the preparatory depression. The reactive depression is associated to the feelings dis-

placed by a patient before what they perceive has been lost, or what they are about to force-

fully surrender as a consequence of their illness (i.e., the amputation of a leg or the los 

movement of the extremities).

15

  The preparatory depression is one "...which does not occur 



as a result of a past loss but is taking into account impending losses."

16

  Kübler-Ross sees in 



this type of depression a pre-stage to acceptance, "... a tool to prepare for the impending 

loss of all the love objects, in order to facilitate the state of acceptance."

17

  To further elabo-



rate this concept of bargaining, she adds:   

 

The patient is in the process of losing everything and everything he loves. If he is 



allowed to express his sorrow he will find final acceptance much easier... This is the 

time when the patient may just ask for a prayer, when he begins to occupy himself 

with things ahead rather than behind."

18

 



 

 

Kübler-Ross concludes her remarks on this stage by suggesting that this type of depres-



sion is "... necessary and beneficial if the patient is to die in a stage of acceptance and peace.   

Only patients who have been able to work through their anguish and anxieties are able to 

achieve this stage."

19

 



 

 

5. Acceptance. In her conception, patients who have been assisted in working with the 



prior stages, will reach a stage during which he is neither depressed nor angry about his 

fate.


20

  Characteristically of this stage is that patients’ feels tired, quiet and weak, with a need 

to doze off to sleep and in brief intervals very similar to that of a newborn.

21

  With regards 



to  these  moods,  Kübler-Ross  argues  that  these  characteristics  should  not  be  taken  as  re-

signed and hopeless giving-up, rather they are indicators of the beginning of the end of the 

struggle, but they are not acceptance.

22

       



 

As she describes it, "Acceptance should not be mistaken for a happy stage. It is almost 

void of feelings. It is as if the pain had gone, the struggle is over, and there comes a time for 

"the final rest before the long journey."

23

  She distinguishes between the patient who fights 



death as means to deny it, and the patient who comes to terms with death and begins to 

detach from their loved-ones and this world, as the patients who are in acceptance. Con-

cerning the first type of patient she states, "The harder they struggle to avoid the inevitable 

death, the more they try to deny it, the more difficult it will be for them to reach this final 

stage of acceptance with peace and dignity."

24

  Though not specifically stated, it seems that 



                                                 

15

Ibid., 86. 



16

Ibid., 86. 

17

Ibid., 87. 



18

Ibid., 87. 

19

Ibid., 88. 



20

Ibid., 112. 

21

Ibid., 112. 



22

Ibid., 112-113. 

23

Ibid., 113. 



24

Ibid., 114. 




 

she considers the second type of patient, (those who gradually detach from family, hus-



bands, with this world, etc.,) the type of patients who fully reach the stage of acceptance. 

 

 



Analysis and Critique to Kübler-Ross Model 

 

 



There is no question that it was Elizabeth Kübler-Ross who popularized the studies on 

the human experience of dying with her book 

On Death and Dying. It should be noted that 

she undertook this task at a time when at a societal level, the subject was considered taboo. 

In this book she elaborated what popularly came to be known as 

the crisis stages of the 

terminally ill patient. Although most contemporary scholars at the time the book was pub-

lished initially questioned and resisted her theory and model, her work has survived her 

critics and her popular stages on death and dying has permeated most disciplines to this 

day.     

 

As I will demonstrate, in this brief critical analysis of her work, Kübler-Ross' model was 



not supported by most of her contemporary researchers in the field. As we will also demon-

strate, experts in the field consider the use of Kübler-Ross' model (as originally stated) a 

serious hazard, both to the patient and the care provider.   

 

In general terms, it could be said that critique of her work will focus on three specific 



areas: 1) lack of traditional scholarly preparation; 2) the use of stages for the model, and 3) 

the clinical use and misuse of the stages. I will proceed to examine each of these areas of 

critique.   

 

 



1. Lack of Traditional Scholarly Preparation 

 

 



Many readers of Kübler-Ross assume that the studies on the subject of death and dying 

began with her work. In other words, many think of her as the pioneer in the field. I assume 

that  such  attributions are  the  result  of  her  own  claims,  when  she  stated  that  she  lacked 

direction  when  she  was  asked  to  write  the  book,  or  to  her  claims  that  her  research  was 

limited by the lack of data on the subject. Concerning her lack of direction, she states: 

   


When I was asked if I would be willing to write a book on death and dying, I enthu-

siastically accepted the challenge. When I actually sat down and began to wonder 

what I had got myself into, it became a different matter. Where do I begin? What to 

include?


25

   


 

 

Concerning the lack of existing data in the subject and how to establish a protocol for 



her work with patients she states: 

 

Then the natural question arose: How do you research on dying, when the data is so 



impossible to get? When you cannot verify your data and cannot set up experiments?   

We met for a while and decided that the best possible way we could study death and 

                                                 

25

Kübler-Ross, 



On Death and Dying

, xi. 



 

dying was by asking terminally ill patients to be our teachers... I was to do the inter-



views while they stood around the bed watching and observing. We would then re-

tire to my office and discuss our own reactions and the patient's response. We be-

lieved that by doing many interviews like this we would get a feeling for the termi-

nally ill and their needs which in turn we were ready to gratify if possible.

26

   


 

 

From her own words, we can assume that Kübler-Ross did not make use of traditional 



scholarly preparation on the topic of death and dying, although some serious research on 

this field had been in existence since 1955. Some literature predating  Kübler-Ross' work 

was: K.R. Eissler, 

The Psychiatrist and the Dying Patient; Herman Feifel, The Meaning of 

Death; Robert Fulton, Death and Identity; Barney G. Glasser and Anselm L. Strauss, Aware-

ness of Dying; Edwin S. Shneidman, Essays In Self-Destruction, and David Sudnow, Passing 

On.

27

  These authors seem to be the real pioneers in the field, however, Kübler-Ross made 



no use of their research. It seems that she ignored what they had to say. 

 

 



2. The Concept of “Stages" in the Model 

 

 



Kübler-Ross' five-Stage model (denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression, and 

acceptance) have been vastly scrutinized by leading researchers. Early as 1973, critique con-

cerning the usefulness of the Stage model began to emerge.

28

  In the process of researching 



these sources, George Fitchett (one of her strongest critics, and one of my CPE supervisors) 

shared with me an unpublished essay in which he and Glen A. Davidson undertook the 

task of examining in depth the work of Kübler-Ross.

29

  A unique contribution in their work, 



which we have not been able to find anywhere else, relates to their extensive and unsur-

passed work analyzing Kübler-Ross' theory against five major topics in thanatology, and 

clinical thanatology (the scientific, humanistic, moral, management, and training programs 

in Kübler-Ross' theory and Stage model). Being that this particular area of their research is 

beyond the intentions of this segment, I will limit myself to acknowledge Fitchett and Da-

vidson's work in this respect.     

 

 

                                                 



26

Kübler-Ross, 

On Death and Dying

, 22-23. 

27

Some literature predating Kübler-Ross work was: K.R. Eissler, 



The Psychiatrist and the Dying Patient

 (New 


York: International Universities Press Inc., 1955); Herman Feifel, 

The Meaning of Death

 (New York: McGraw-

Hill Book Co., 1959); Robert Fulton, 

Death and Identity

 (New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1965); Barney 

G. Glasser and Anselm L. Strauss, 

Awareness of Dying

 (New York: Aldine Publishing Co., 1965); Edwin S. 

Shneidman, 

Essays In Self-Destruction

 (New York: Jason Aronson Inc., 1967), and David Sudnow, 

Passing 

On

 (New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc., 1967). 



28

Some important literature addressing the use and misuse of Kübler-Ross model are: Charles A. Garfield, ed., 

Psychological Care of the Dying Patient

 (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1978); Richard Schultz and David Ader-

man, "Clinical Research and the Stages of Dying." 

Omega


 5, no. 2 (1974): 

137-143


; George Fitchett, "Wisdom 

and Folly in Death and Dying." 

Journal of Religion and Health

 19, no. 3 (Fall 1980): 

203-214

.   


29

George Fitchett and Glen W. Davidson, 

Toward Understanding "On Death and Dying"

 Unpublished. I have 

asked permission to Fitchett to state in this note that if any reader wishes to contact them to request copies of 

this magnificent essay they shall contact Fitchett at Rush-St Luke's Medical Center, Chicago Illinois. 




 

 



Analyzing the emerging critique to Kübler-Ross, Fitchett and Davidson refer to Schultz 

and Aderman's evaluation of Kübler Ross' Stage model. Schultz and Aderman's came to the 

following conclusion:   

 

Unfortunately, the usefulness of  Kübler-Ross' work is limited by its ambiguity, in 



large part the product of the highly subjective manner in which observations were 

obtained and interpreted. Kübler-Ross failed to explicitly specify assessment proce-

dures for determining through which stages of dying a patient has passed. Judging 

from the interview protocols Kübler-Ross has presented as evidence in support of 

her stage model, it appears that she depended more on intuition to define a partic-

ular stage than any systemic pattern of responses from the patient.

30

 

 



 

Concerning the reliability and replication problems of Kübler-Ross' model, Schultz and 

Aderman compared her model and findings, with researchers who plotted the emotional 

trajectory of the dying patient with more objective methods. Their study concluded that: 

 

On the basis of her interviews with terminally ill patients, Kübler-Ross proposed a 



five stage model  of the dying process. Other investigators, relying less on clinical 

insight and more objective measurement, have reported data which call into ques-

tion the validity of Kübler-Ross' observations. Whereas these researchers have gen-

erally found, in agreement with Kübler-Ross, that most terminal patients experience 

depression shortly before death, they have failed to obtain any consistent evidence 

that other affect dimensions also characterize the dying patient.

31

 

 



 

Furthermore, Edwin Shneidman, in his diverging with Kübler-Ross concerning the uni-

versal attributions of her model states: 

 

My own limited work has not led me to conclusions identical with those of Kübler-



Ross. Indeed while I have seen in dying person’s isolation, envy, bargaining, depres-

sion and acceptance, I do not believe that these are necessarily "stages" of the dying 

process, and I am not convinced that they are lived through in that order, or, for that 

matter, in any universal order. What I do see is a complicated clustering of intellec-

tual and affective stages, some not unexpectedly, against the backdrop of that per-

son's total personality, his "philosophy of life.

32

   


 

 

Garfield  also  expressed  concerns  about  Kübler-Ross'  theory  and  stage  model,  or  any 



other model claiming universal applications. He states: 

 

 



                                                 

30

Ibid., 15. Fitchett and Davidson quote: Schultz and Aderman, "Clinical Research and the Stages of Dying," 



138.   

31

Ibid., 15. Fitchett and Davidson quote: Schultz and Alderman, "Clinical Research and the Stages of Dying," 



142.   

32

Ibid., 16. Fitchett and Davidson quote: Edwin S. Shneidman, 



Deaths of Man

 (Baltimore: Penguin Books, 

1973), 6. 



 

To  date,  no  researcher  or  systemic  clinical  observation  has  verified  any  prepro-



grammed set of stages in the dying process; that is, researchers and practitioners have 

not yet empirically identified any set of linear, unidirectional, and invariant stages. 

Certainly many patients who are dying exhibit denial, anger, depression, and occa-

sionally acceptance, but it is inaccurate to suppose that all individuals, regardless of 

belief systems, age, race, culture, and historical period die in a uniform sequence. It 

is more likely that existing theoretical frameworks become self-fulfilling prophesies 

imposed by health care professionals who may coerce the dying person into con-

forming to a powerfully suggested typology.

33

 

 



 

These sources are only a brief sample of the vast scholarly critique to the Stage model of 

Kübler-Ross. Amidst the stated critique to her model, researchers' feedback to the model 

was ignored by the health care professionals at the time her theory was gaining grounds.                                     

 

 

 



 

3.    The Clinical Use and Misuse of the Stage Theory 

 

 

After the publication of Kübler-Ross' book 



On Death and Dying, the impact on health 

professionals was monumental. In a passionate essay addressing how  Kübler-Ross' Stage 

model was affecting adversely the health care professionals, especially in the hospital envi-

ronments, Larry Churchill states:     

 

Kübler-Ross' portrayal of the dying person as passing through stages has become, if 



not and official doctrine, the dominant exemplary paradigm for understanding dy-

ing —one without a significant rival either in the health sciences of the general cul-

ture.

34

       



 

 

Churchill perceived Kübler-Ross' model as a service as well as a disservice to the heath 



sciences.

35

  He also cautions about the hazards of taking her work as more than an intention 



to examine critically our [health care profession] attitudes about, and practices with, the 

dying.


36

  He focused his critique in two basic areas: a) the effects that the expectations of a 

progressive stage model could have in the care providers,  b)  the implications of a stage 

model with an aesthetic appeal in the treatment of a terminally ill patients. I will briefly 

examine these areas of critique. 

 

 



a) The effects that the expectations of a progressive stage model could have in the care 

providers. Although Churchill accepts that there is a certain utility in the stage model, in 

the sense that it provides  one with, "  ...handles or points of entry to comprehend what 

                                                 

33

Fitchett and Davidson quote: Garfield, 



Elements of Psychosocial Oncology

 103. 


34

Larry R. Churchill, “The Human Experience of Dying: The Moral Primacy of Stories Over Stages,” 

Soundings

 

62, no. 1 (Spring 1979): 24. 



35

Ibid., 24. 

36

Ibid., 25. 




10 

 

before was enigmatic even chaotic,"



37

  he also questions the progressive bias of the stages.   

Churchill sees in Kübler-Ross' Stage model an embedded dangerous appeal to implement 

a stage model that could represent a hazard, both, to the patient and the care provider.    In 

the words of Churchill: 

 

The temptation to engineer the process of dying for our patients… [in which] our 



expectations become shaped by the progressivist philosophy in such way that the 

genuine experiences of dying are pre-empted by our sense of how people ought to 

die. The progressivist philosophy carries an implicit norm, such that we even feel an 

obligation to move the dying along —to get them through denial, anger, bargaining 

and depression to acceptance. We feel frustrated, cheated, or that we have failed if 

this does not happened. We become obsessed with the stages as normative protocol 

we are treating dying as a technical problem.

38

 



 

 

b)  The  implications  of  a  stage  model  with  an  aesthetic  appeal  in  the  treatment  of  a 



terminally ill patient. Churchill's concern could be stated in the following question: How 

does a progressive stage model that begins with four initial negative stages and concludes 

in a positive final stage affect the health care professionals, when the final stage implies that 

the  "


good  dying  patients"  are  the  ones  who  accept  death  with  serenity  or  calmness?   

Churchill sees in this aesthetic expectation of Kübler-Ross' model a bias that:   

 

...makes  [the]  acceptance  [stage]  morally  desirable,  and  places  an  obligation  on 



health care professionals to realize it in their patients.    In other words, the sequence 

of progressive stages culminating in acceptance has an aesthetical pleasing quality. 

The tranquil, accepting dying person causes no disturbances and is simple to man-

age.


39

 

 



 

Finally, Churchill views the aesthetic implications of the Kübler-Ross model as an at-

tempt to label and control the experience of the dying person. In Churchill's words:   

 

Far  more  important  than  any  reservations  we  might  have  about  the  progressivist 



philosophy of dying or the achievement of an aesthetically pleasing death is the fact 

that the stages provide labels to place upon the dying person. The effect of the labels 

is to categorize and control —to manage not only the dying person (who is "out of 

Control" by Western technocratic standards), but to control the meaning of the ex-

periences as well.

40

 



 

 

Fitchett also arrives to similar conclusions regarding the implications of a stage model 



with an aesthetic appeal. His critique suggest that for the medical staff to classify beforehand   

 

                                                 



37

Ibid., 25. 

38

Ibid., 25-26. 



39

Ibid., 26. 

40

Ibid., 27. 




11 

 

the patient in any of the stages could be hazardous to the patient. He also argues that the 



stage model promotes an impersonal approach to care.

41

 



 

 

 



D. Responses to Kübler-Ross Model 

 

 



There is no need to debate the fact that Kübler-Ross' work played a crucial role in the 

field of death and dying theories. When one compares the effect of prior research on death 

topics, to the arrival of  Kübler-Ross' theory, one can safely say that the preexisting work 

remained secluded at a scholarly level, while Kübler-Ross' work impacted and shook the 

foundations of our society. In that sense, it can be said that to a great extent, the current 

social openness to discuss topics of death and dying can be attributed to her.     

 

Amidst the above attribution to Kübler-Ross' work, the researched sources allow me to 



conclude that although Kübler-Ross' stage model reached immense popularity, the model 

never gained the same level of acceptance from her professional peers. The model was per-

ceived as lacking in coherency and cohesiveness. My sense is that these attributions relate 

to several factors. On the one hand, it seems that  Kübler-Ross failed to examine, and to 

incorporate significant preexisting research on the topic when she developed her theory.   

From my perspective, this factor led her to develop a model isolated from existing investi-

gation. Thus, leaving behind a model based mostly on anecdotal discussion of personal 

experiences, and vague treatment of the dying stages.   

 

On the other hand is the universal claims of Kübler-Ross' model. Since she did not con-



sider important variables such as the role of culture, gender, ethnicity, belief systems, ages, 

behaviors and other important variables in the analysis of death and dying, I will suggest 

caution in the application of the model as originally stated. I base my concern in the fact 

that common knowledge suggests that these variables play an important role in the dying 

process of a person, and cannot be underestimated.     

 

Concerning researchers' critiques in what they perceive as a fixed rigidity in the order 



the stages should develop, my sense is that this may be a partially fair critique. Though I 

understand that much of the criticism is based in assumptions drawn from her own defini-

tions, and use of vocabulary to describe the transitions between the stages, I am also aware 

that Kübler-Ross herself suggested in various parts of her book that the stages could coexist 

or take place simultaneously. My sense is that besides the vocabulary issues, a stronger con-

tributing factor may be based in the way the model was graphically presented. From that 

perspective, no matter what position one takes, if rigid stages or not, the graph leads to 

contradictions between Kübler-Ross' claims of how the stages can coexist side by side, and 

the sequential process suggested by the graph. 

    With regards to Churchill's perceived hazards of the stages to the patients and care pro-

viders who are exposed to Kübler-Ross' theory, I firmly agree that the potential of hazard 

exists, as described by Churchill. Particularly when the model is accepted uncritically. My 

experience in the hospital setting is that the staff who expects the patient to "progress" from 

                                                 

41

George Fitchett, "Is Time To Bury the Stage Theory of Death and Dying,” 



Oncology Nurse Exchange

 2, no. 


3 (Fall 1980): 97-104. This author represents one of the leading challenging pastoral voices toward Kübler 

Ross model.       




12 

 

one stage to the other, treat patients impersonally or, as Churchill suggests, as a technical 



problem. They also tend to reprimand patients for not cooperating with a perceived natural 

process of dying as defined by Kübler-Ross.     

 

 

In other cases I have personally provided counseling to staff who developed a sense of 



inadequacy because they feel they have failed in facilitating a smooth progression of the 

patient from one stage to another. I have also experienced patients who feel frustrated be-

cause they perceive themselves stagnating between stages. Furthermore, I have also invested 

many hours with patients who feel confused because they have not been able to reach "the 

ideal stage of acceptance" or as Kübler-Ross states, the good dying stage. At some levels I 

have found  myself  "deprogramming" staff and patients  concerning the death and  dying 

model as originally stated by Kübler-Ross. On the other hand, staff and patients who have 

approached Kübler-Ross theory critically, make use of her theory, as Churchill suggest, as 

"handles or ports of entry" to understand and initiate conversations on death and dying 

issues.     

 

Though I can agree or disagree with particular aspects of Kübler-Ross' theory and her 



critics,  the  following  questions  need  to  be  addressed:  Why  did  the  model  have  such  an 

impact? Why has the model prevailed to this day amidst strong scholarly critique? What 

remains of the model today? I will attempt to provide some answers to these questions. 

 

 



1.    Why Did the Model Have Such Impact? 

 

 



On the one hand, Kübler-Ross' theory was produced in the midst of the generation of 

the sixties. This is an important clue for me. One must remember that this period was no-

torious  for the counter culture movements.  People were defying authority. Social  values 

were changing. All fronts of society were being challenged. In that sense, in a  world that 

was  experiencing  social  revolution,  taboo  themes,  such  as  death,  were  being  redefined, 

questioned and freely examined by everyone. No longer did the church or the academic 

institutions held the absolute truths. No longer were the powers that be remaining unchal-

lenged. In light of the context, it is my opinion that Kübler-Ross, willingly or unwillingly, 

became part of the social revolution of the time by addressing a theme reserved to specific 

social and academic authorities. 

 

Along those lines, is Kübler-Ross' use of common language combined with anecdotal 



narratives  to  describe  complicated  psychological,  and  existential  processes.  By  using  the 

minimum scholarly oriented language to describe her theory, she managed to address her 

concepts to the average and less sophisticated person. In that sense, when one reads her 

book, it seems that one is reading a novel. As a sort of novel, the use of terms such as anger, 

denial, depression, bargaining, and acceptance, along with the anecdotes that explained the 

stages, had the effect of placing the readers face to face with "real life episodes and charac-

ters" to whom they could relate. In other words, the labels she used to describe the stages 

worked as metaphors of life accessible to anyone. With the same token, while able to engage 

the masses with the use of "down to earth language," she lost the support of her peers.   

 

 



 


13 

 

2. Why Has the Model Prevailed to this Day,   



Amidst Strong Scholarly Critique? 

 

 



My best guess is that since the model has permeated most disciplines, and all levels of 

society, and thus, the death and dying stages have been coined into our language and think-

ing, people have assumed that the model is authoritative in its claims and therefore, ac-

cepted by everyone with little critique. On the other hand no one denies that terminally ill 

patients, as well as people in crisis in general experience anger, denial, depression, bargain-

ing, and acceptance, at some levels in one form or the other.   

 

 

3.    What Remains of the Model Today? 



 

 

Although the model is still well and alive, the current use of Kübler-Ross theory is lim-



ited to the recognition of anger, denial, depression, bargaining, and acceptance, but not as 

rigid or sequential stages. People mostly recognize these as episodes or ways in which crisis 

may manifest in some patients, without having to subscribe to the stage model as described 

by Kübler-Ross. By comparison with other theories that have influenced the world, I can 

safely  suggest  that in  the  same  way that  hardly  no  one  uses  Freud's  theory  as  originally 

stated by him, few use Kübler-Ross as originally stated by her. Both are still vital theoretical 

frameworks for various disciplines, though both have undergone revisions, actualization, 

and changes.       



Yüklə 138,19 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə