Science Magazine



Yüklə 46,58 Kb.

tarix08.12.2017
ölçüsü46,58 Kb.


sciencemag.org

  SCIENCE



1 5 14        

24 JUNE 2016 • VOL 352 ISSUE 6293

ILL

U

S



TR

A

TION: D



ARIA

 KIRP


A

CH/@S


ALZMANAR

T

By



 Joshua D. Greene

S

uppose that a driverless car is headed 



toward five pedestrians. It can stay on 

course  and  kill  them  or  swerve  into 

a  concrete  wall,  killing  its  passenger. 

On  page  1573  of  this  issue,  Bonnefon 



et al.

 (1) explore this social dilemma in 

a  series  of  clever  survey  experiments.  They 

show  that  people  generally  approve  of  cars 

programmed  to  minimize  the  total  amount 

of harm, even at the expense of their passen-

gers, but are not enthusiastic about riding in 

such  “utilitarian”  cars—that  is,  autonomous 

vehicles that are, in certain emergency situ-

ations,  programmed  to  sacrifice  their  pas-

sengers for the greater good. Such dilemmas 

may  arise  infrequently,  but  once  millions 

of  autonomous  vehicles  are  on  the  road, 

the  improbable  becomes  probable,  perhaps 

even inevitable. And even if such cases never 

arise,  autonomous  vehicles  must  be  pro-

grammed to handle them. How should they 

be programmed? And who should decide?

Bonnefon et al. explore many interesting 

variations,  such  as  how  attitudes  change 

when a family member is on board or when 

the number of lives to be saved by swerving 

gets larger. As one might expect, people are 

even  less  comfortable  with  utilitarian  sac-

rifices  when  family  members  are  on  board 

and somewhat more comfortable when sac-

rificial swerves save larger numbers of lives. 

But across all of these variations, the social 

dilemma remains robust. A major determi-

nant  of  people’s  attitudes  toward  utilitar-

ian  cars  is  whether  the  question  is  about 

utilitarian cars in general or about riding in 

them oneself.

In light of this consistent finding, the au-

thors consider policy strategies and pitfalls. 

They note that the best strategy for utilitar-

ian policy-makers may, ironically, be to give 

up on utilitarian cars. Autonomous vehicles 

are expected to greatly reduce road fatalities 

(2). If that proves true, and if utilitarian cars 

are unpopular, then pushing for utilitarian 

cars may backfire by delaying the adoption 

of generally safer autonomous vehicles. 

ETHICS

Our driverless dilemma

When should your car be willing to kill you?

INSIGHTS

Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science

Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

Email: jgreene@wjh.harvard.edu

P E R S P E C T I V E S

Published by AAAS

 on June 23, 2016

http://science.sciencemag.org/

Downloaded from 




SCIENCE  

sciencemag.org

24 JUNE 2016 • VOL 352 ISSUE 6293

    1515

As  the  authors  acknowledge,  attitudes 

toward  utilitarian  cars  may  change  as  na-

tions  and  communities  experiment  with 

different  policies.  People  may  get  used  to 

utilitarian  autonomous  vehicles,  just  as 

some  Europeans  have  grown  accustomed 

to  opt-out  organ  donation  programs  (3

and  Australians  have  grown  accustomed 

to stricter gun laws (4). Likewise, attitudes 

may  change  as  we  rethink  our  transpor-

tation  systems.  Today,  cars  are  beloved 

personal  possessions,  and  the  prospect 

of  being  killed  by  one’s  own  car  may  feel 

like a personal betrayal to be avoided at all 

costs. But as autonomous vehicles take off, 

car  ownership  may  decline  as  people  tire 

of paying to own vehicles that stay parked 

most of the time (5). The cars of the future 

may  be  interchangeable  units  within  vast 

transportation  systems,  like  the  cars  of  to-

day’s  subway  trains.  As  our  thinking  shifts 

from  personal  vehicles  to  transportation 

systems,  people  might  prefer  systems  that 

maximize overall safety. 

In  their  experiments,  Bonnefon  et  al

assume  that  the  autonomous  vehicles’ 

emergency  algorithms  are  known  and  that 

their  expected  consequences  are  trans-

parent.  This  need  not  be  the  case.  In  fact, 

the  most  pressing  issue  we  face  with  re-

spect to autonomous vehicle ethics may be 

transparency.  Life-and-death  trade-offs  are 

unpleasant,  and  no  matter  which  ethical 

principles autonomous vehicles adopt, they 

will be open to compelling criticisms, giving 

manufacturers  little  incentive  to  publicize 

their  operating  principles.  Manufacturers 

of utilitarian cars will be criticized for their 

willingness  to  kill  their  own  passengers. 

Manufacturers  of  cars  that  privilege  their 

own passengers will be criticized for devalu-

ing the lives of others and their willingness 

to cause additional deaths. Tasked with sat-

isfying  the  demands  of  a  morally  ambiva-

lent  public,  the  makers  and  regulators  of 

autonomous  vehicles  will  find  themselves 

in a tight spot.

Software  engineers—unlike  politicians, 

philosophers,  and  opinionated  uncles—

don’t have the luxury of vague abstraction. 

They can’t implore their machines to respect 

people’s rights, to be virtuous, or to seek jus-

tice—at least not until we have moral theo-

ries  or  training  criteria  sufficiently  precise 

to  determine  exactly  which  rights  people 

have, what virtue requires, and which trade-

offs are just. We can program autonomous 

vehicles to minimize harm, but that, appar-

ently,  is  not  something  with  which  we  are 

entirely comfortable.

Bonnefon  et  al.  show  us,  in  yet  another 

way,  how  hard  it  will  be  to  design  autono-

mous  machines  that  comport  with  our 

moral  sensibilities  (6–8).  The  problem,  it 

seems, is more philosophical than technical. 

Before we can put our values into machines, 

we have to figure out how to make our val-

ues  clear  and  consistent.  For  21st-century 

moral philosophers, this may be where the 

rubber meets the road.        

j

R E F E R E N C E S

  1.  J.-F. Bonnefon et al., Science 352, 1573 (2016).

  2.  P. Gao, R. Hensley, A. Zielke, A Road Map to the Future for 



the Auto Industry

 (McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC, 2014).

  3.  E. J. Johnson, D. G. Goldstein, Science 302, 1338 (2003).

  4.  S. Chapman et al., Injury Prev. 12, 365 (2006).

  5.  D. Neil, “Could self-driving cars spell the end of car owner-

ship?”, Wall Street Journal, 1 December 2015; www.wsj.

com/articles/could-self-driving-cars-spell-the-end-of-

ownership-1448986572.

  6.  I. Asimov, I, Robot [stories] (Gnome, New York, 1950).

  7.  W. Wallach, C. Allen, Moral Machines: Teaching Robots 



Right from Wrong

 (Oxford Univ. Press, 2010).

  8.  P. Lin, K. Abney, G. A. Bekey, Robot Ethics: The Ethical and 

Social Implications of Robotics

 (MIT Press, 2011).

10.126/science.aaf9534

IMMUNOLOGY

Converting 

to adapt

Gut microbiota affect 

T cell plasticity in the 

intestinal lining



By

 Marco Colonna 

and

 

Luisa Cervantes-Barragan

E

ffective  immune  responses  rely  on 



balancing  lymphocyte  stability  and 

plasticity.  Lymphocytes  have  regula-

tory  circuits  that  control  phenotypic 

and functional identity. Stable circuits 

maintain  homeostasis  and  prevent 

autoimmunity.  But  plasticity  is  needed  to 

integrate  new  environmental  inputs  and 

generate  immune  responses  that  subdue 

the  eliciting  agent  without  damaging  tis-

sue.  Regulatory  T  cells  (T

regs

)  are  a  subset 



of  CD4

+

  T  cells  that  control  effector  T  cell 



responses  and  prevent  excessive  inflam-

mation  and  autoimmunity  (1,  2).  On  page 

1581  in  this  issue,  Sujino  et  al.  (3)  report 

that  intestinal  T

regs

  convert  into  CD4



+

  in-


traepithelial T cells (CD4

IELs


) to adapt to the 

local intestinal environment, thus identify-

ing the intestinal epithelium as a compart-

ment that enforces lymphocyte plasticity. 

CD4

IELs


 are implicated in various immune 

responses,  including  tolerance  to  dietary 

antigens  (4).  They  originate  from  CD4

+

  T 



helper  cells  in  the  intestinal  lamina  pro-

pria, and can produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ), 

a cytokine that triggers immune responses 

to  infection,  as  well  as  promote  cytoly-

sis.  Differentiation  of  T  cells  into  CD4

IELs


 

is  governed  by  the  reduced  expression  of 

ThPOK  (T  helper–inducing  POZ/Kruppel 

factor),  a  transcription  factor  that  drives 

the  CD4

+

  T  helper  cell  program.  More-



over, increased expression of Runx3 (runt-

related  transcription  factor  3)  drives  the 

CD8

+

 T cell program, i.e. IFN-γ production 



and cytolysis (56). CD4

IELs


 in the intestinal 

Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington 

University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. 

Email: mcolonna@pathology.wustl.edu

Moral dilemma. 

Should autonomous vehicles protect 

their passengers or minimize the total amount of harm? 

“…Foxp3

+

 cells might rapidly 

convert into another T cell 

subtype.”

Published by AAAS

 on June 23, 2016

http://science.sciencemag.org/

Downloaded from 




 (6293), 1514-1515. [doi: 10.1126/science.aaf9534]

352

Science 

Joshua D. Greene (June 23, 2016) 



Our driverless dilemma

 

Editor's Summary



 

 

 



This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. 

Article Tools

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6293/1514

article tools: 

Visit the online version of this article to access the personalization and



Permissions

http://www.sciencemag.org/about/permissions.dtl

Obtain information about reproducing this article: 

 is a registered trademark of AAAS. 



Science

Advancement of Science; all rights reserved. The title 

Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20005. Copyright 2016 by the American Association for the

in December, by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1200 New York 

(print ISSN 0036-8075; online ISSN 1095-9203) is published weekly, except the last week

Science 

 on June 23, 2016

http://science.sciencemag.org/

Downloaded from 




Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə