Six-week blueberry harvest requires year-round work



Yüklə 80,13 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix06.02.2018
ölçüsü80,13 Kb.
#26120


 July 7, 2015 

Brothers Joe (L) and Don Dzen roll up mesh netting covering their entire 20-acre blueberry orchard in  East Windsor.  

                     

SIX-WEEK BLUEBERRY HARVEST REQUIRES YEAR-ROUND WORK   

                                         

By Steve Jensen, Office of Commissioner Steven K. Reviczky  

 

While strawberries may be consid-



ered the summer’s marquee fruit, 

Don Dzen says it is actually blueber-

ries that draw more pick-your-own 

customers to his family’s East Wind-

sor farm.  

  “I think blueberries are more popu-

lar because they’re easier to pick 

and you’re not crawling around on 

the ground,” Dzen said late last 

week as he prepared to open the 20

-acre blueberry orchard on Barber 

Hill Road.  “Picking blueberries has 

really become an event to be out with the family and the kids.” 

  Blueberries are July’s featured crop in a Department of Agri-

culture program that promotes a different specialty crop each 

month.  


  Promotions can be heard on several state broadcast radio 

stations, including in Spanish, as well as on Pandora radio.  

The crop is also featured on the department’s Facebook and 

Pinterest pages.  

  The Dzens are one of more than 300 blueberry growers in 

Connecticut that cultivate about 430 acres of the fruit.    

 

  A complete list of pick-your-own 



farms is available on the agriculture 

department’s website: 

CTGrown.gov.

 

  At Dzen’s Blueberry Hill last week, 



Don and his brother Joe were busy 

readying for the traditional July 4th 

opening of their orchard. In a field 

across the road, about a dozen peo-

ple were scouring for the last remain-

ing pick-your-own strawberries. 

  “There’s really not a break between 

seasons,” Don Dzen said. “It’s all 

very condensed.”  

  The Dzens grow three varieties of  

blueberries that mature and ripen throughout the six-week sea-

son.  


  Bluetta is the earliest, but produces a relatively small berry.  

The later varieties, Blue Ray and Blue Crop, “are the big ones 

that everybody wants,” Joe said as he sampled some of the 

early Bluettas from right off the bush.  

  They employ a crew of about 20 that picks for commercial 

sale to outlets including Whole Foods and Stew Leonard’s, as 

well as farm stands and markets such as their own just down 

the road in Ellington. The farm was founded in the 1930s by  

                        (Continued on Page 3)   



        PA LIVESTOCK SUMMARY 

  

                Avg. Dressing 



                                  

  

  SLAUGHTER COWS:       



LOW         HIGH

 

  breakers 75-80% lean      102.00    112.00 



boners 80-85% lean       101.00    111.00 

lean 88-90% lean             96.00    105.50 

CALVES graded bull 

  No 1 120-128 lbs        470.00   470.00 

    No 1 106-118 lbs        512.00   530.00 

    No 1 98-104 lbs          550.00    555.00 

    No 1 86-96 lbs           570.00   595.00 

    No 2 120-128 lbs        462.00   462.00 

    No 2 112-118 lbs        512.00   512.00

    No 2 102-110 lbs        530.00   537.00 

No 2  94-100 lbs          545.00   555.00 

No 2 80-92 lbs           565.00   585.00 

SLAUGHTER STEERS   

   


HiCh/Prm 3-4            153.00   158.50

    Ch2-3                    148.50   154.00 

    Sel1-3                    140.00   149.00 

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEINS 

    HiCh/Prm 3-4            139.00   145.00 

  Ch2-3            

        131.00   140.00

 

  Sel1-2                   



125.00   135.50 

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS  

    HiCh/Prm3-4             

149.50   154.00 

  Ch2-3                    

147.00   153.00 

  Sel2-3                    146.00   149.00 

 

NEW HOLLAND, PA  

  SLAUGHTER LAMBS: 

Wooled & Shorn Choice and 

    Prime 2-3 

    60-80 lbs                 225.00   232.00 

    80-90 lbs                 218.00   222.00 

    90-110 lbs                  222.00   235.00 

    110-130 lbs              226.00   226.00 

  SLAUGHTER EWES:

 Good 2-3 

    90-110 lbs                       90.00    104.00

    120-160 lbs                92.00    105.00 

    160-200 lbs                    90.00    106.00 

  BUCKS 

    80-100 lbs                 206.00    206.00  

    160-200 lbs              117.00   146.00 

    200-300 lbs                94.00   112.00 

  SLAUGHTER GOATS: 

Sel.1, by head, est. 

    40-60 lbs                 172.00   190.00 

     60-80 lbs                 195.00   225.00 

   

Nannies/Does



:   

    130-180 lbs              240.00   262.00 

   

Bucks/Billies



:  

    150-250 lbs              220.00   245.00 

     

                       



   

   


 

  NEW HOLLAND, PA. HOG AUCTION 

 

52-56      200-300 lbs        62.00      65.00 



            250-300 lbs         57.00     59.00 

            300-350 lbs        50.00     55.00 

48-52       200-300 lbs        50.00     55.00 

Sows, US1-3  

350-450 lbs        25.00      28.00 

450-500 lbs        30.50     32.00 

500-650 lbs        28.00     32.00 

Boars      200-300 lbs         35.00     37.00 

            400-750 lbs         9.00      13.00 

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 

      Middlefield, CT, July 6, 2015  

 

Bob Calves:               



LOW       HIGH 

  

45-60 lbs.                100.00    115.00 

61-75 lbs.               120.00   130.00 

76-90 lbs.               510.00   520.00 

91-105 lbs.              530.00   540.00 

106 lbs. & up            550.00   560.00 

Farm Calves            570.00   580.00 

Starter Calves             90.00   110.00 

Veal Calves               1@     110.00 

Open Heifers            130.00   177.50 

Beef Heifers            150.00   162.50 

Feeder Steers           140.00   185.00 

Beef Steers             125.00   127.00 

Stock Bulls              140.00   155.00 

Beef Bulls               139.00   142.00 

Replacement Cows       n/a       n/a 

Replacement Heifers       n/a        n/a 

Boars                     1@       .01  

Sows                       1@       23.00 

Butcher Hogs               n/a       n/a 

Feeder Pigs                n/a        n/a 

Sheep                     85.00   180.00 

Lambs                  190.00   240.00  

Goats each              100.00   270.00 

Kid Goats                 65.00   125.00 

Canners                   up to     105.50 

Cutters                  102.00   104.00 

Utility Grade Cows      105.00   109.00 

Rabbits each                5.00     24.00 

Chickens each              3.00     30.00 

Ducks each                 7.00     12.00 

             

         

        NORTHEAST EGGS/USDA 

          Per doz. Grade A and Grade A white  

          in cartons to retailers (volume buyers)   

  

   



  

    XTRA LARGE            1.81    1.99 

    LARGE                  1.75    1.89 

    MEDIUM                 1.45    1.58 

       

      NEW ENGLAND SHELL EGGS 

                  Per doz. Grade A brown in  

          carton delivered store door. (Range) 

          

    XTRA LARGE              2.20  2.30   

    LARGE                    2.17  2.27 

    MEDIUM                   1.80  1.84 

    


      PA FEEDER PIG SUMMARY  

 US #1-2   20-30 lb         150.00    150.00 

            30-40 lb         110.00   300.00 

            40-50 lb         100.00   130.00 

            50-60 lb           85.00   140.00 

            60-80 lb           85.00   120.00 

 US #2-3   20-30 lb         100.00   170.00 

            30-40 lb         130.00   140.00 

            40-50 lb         100.00   100.00 

            50-60 lb         110.00   110.00 

            60-80 lb            85.00      85.00 

 

 USDA ORGANIC HAY-SQUARES 

 

                                        GOOD 

  ALFALFA        LARGE  230.00   300.00 

  ALFALFA/ 

  ORCHARD        SMALL   175.00   175.00 

    WHOLESALE FRUITS & VEGETABLES   

 Boston Terminal and Wholesale Grower Prices 

 

   NEW ENGLAND GROWN                                                             

                                              



LOW    HIGH 

    


      ALFALFA SPROUTS, 5 LB        14.00   14.00    

      BEANS, GREEN, BU              30.00   30.00 

    BEANS, WAX, BU                 30.00   30.00 

    BEANS, WAX, 1/2 BU             18.00   20.00    

    BEAN SPROUTS, 10 LB            6.00     7.00 

    BEETS, 12 CT                     15.00   18.00 

    BEETS, GOLDEN, 12 CT          24.00   24.00 

    BLUEBERRIES,12-1 PT/LIDS     30.00   30.00 

    BROCCOLI, 12 CT                15.00   15.00 

    CHERRIES, 12-1PT               25.00   25.00 

    CIDER, APPLE, 4 –1 GAL         21.00   21.00 

    CORN, 5 DOZ                     18.00   22.00  

    CUKES, 1-1/9 BU                  23.00   30.00  

    CUKES,PICKLING, 1/2 BU        18.00   20.00 

    KALE, PER BUNCH                 1.00     1.25 

LETTUCE,HYDR0PONIC,12 CT    15.00   15.00  

    LETTCE,LF,GRN,RED 12 CT     12.00    15.00 

    LETTUCE, ROMAINE, 12 CT      12.00    15.00    

    PEAS, ENGLISH, 1/2 BU          20.00   20.00 

    PEAS, ENGLISH, BU              50.00   50.00 

    PEAS, SNOW, 10 LB              15.00   15.00 

    PEAS, SNAP, 10 LB               20.00   20.00 

    RADISHES, BUNCHED, 12 CT    10.00   12.00 

    RASPBERRIES, 12-1/2PTS       25.00   25.00 

    SQUASH, 8 BALL, 1/2 BU         12.00   15.00 

    SQUASH, PATTYPAN, 1/2 BU     13.00   15.00 

    SQUASH,YELLOW, 1/2 BU        12.00   15.00 

    SQUASH, GOLDN ZUCH,1/2 BU  15.00   15.00 

    SQUASH, ZUCH,1/2 BU            12.00    15.00 

    STRAWBERRIES, 8-1QT          32.00   32.00 

    SWISH CHRD,BUNCHED,12 CT  15.00    18.00  

    TOMATOES, GRHSE, 12 LB      22.00    24.00 

      TOMS,HEIRLOOM,GH,10LB      23.00    25.00 

 

     SHIPPED IN         

 

    APRICOTS,WA, 2LYR PK,72      32.00   33.00 



    CANTALOUPE. GA, 9             15.00   16.00    

    GARLIC, WHITE, CA, 30LB       64.00   68.00 

    GRAPE,WHT,SDLS,CA,19LB,#1  28.00   32.00 

    NECTARINE, CA,25LB,54 /56     24.00   26.00 

    OKRA, FL, 1/2 BU                 18.00   22.00  

    PARSLEY, PLAIN, NJ,  30  CT     25.00   28.00 

    PEACHES, GA, 1/2 BU, 2-3/4”    18.00   22.00 

    PEPPERS, BELL, NJ, 1-1/9 BU    32.00   32.00  

    PLUMS, BLK, CA,28LB, 30-35    38.00   42.00 

    TURNIP,PRPLE TOPS, NJ, 25LB  20.00   20.00 

    WTRMLN,SDLS,10-14LB, EA        3.25     3.50 

 

USDA-WHOLESALE  

ORGANIC BROWN EGGS 

  

    EX LARGE  DOZ                      2.61     3.61 

    EX LGE 1/2 DOZ                      1.81     1.95 

    LARGE DOZ                           2.30     3.50 

    LARGE 1/2 DOZ                     1.71     1.90 



                          FOR SALE 

1-R. Blumenthal & Donahue is now Connecticut’s first inde-

pendent NATIONWIDE Agri-Business Insurance Agency. Christ-

mas tree growers, beekeepers, sheep breeders, organic farmers 

and all others, call us for all your insurance needs. 800-554-8049 

or www.bludon.com 

2-R. Farm, homeowner and commercial insurance—we do it 

all. Call Blumenthal & Donahue 800-554-8049 or www.bludon.com 

3-R.  Gallagher electric fencing for farms, horses, deer control, 

gardens, & beehives. Sonpal’s Power Fence 860-491-2290. 

4-R.  Packaging for egg sales. New egg cartons, flats, egg 

cases, 30 doz and 15 doz.  Polinsky Farm 860-376-2227. 

5-R. Nationwide Agribusiness Insurance Program, endorsed 

by the CT Farm Bureau, save up to 23% on your farm insurance 

and get better protection. References available from satisfied farm-

ers. Call Marci today at 203-444-6553. 

8-R. CT non-GMO grain and corn. Hay and straw. Pleasant 

View Farms. Louis. 860-803-0675.  

53-R. There’s still time to buy a Classic…but not much. New 

federal EPA-NSPS rules will soon eliminate your choice to buy a 

new Classic. Now is the best time to buy a new Classic. 203-263-

2123 


www.mywoodfurnace.com

  

62-R. Kubota L3010 w/LA 481 front loader weight box 5 ft 



brush hog. 300 hours. $16,500.00. 860-205-3399.  

65-R. For Sale: Parts for Grimm hay tedders. Also, rough lum-

ber. 860-684-3458. 

67-R. 5HP water pumps for farm/nursery irrigation. 230 volt 80 

GPM. Both pumps for $1,100.00 or B.O. 203-482-3816 

nick@sambridge.com

  

68-R. Barn doors. 9’X9’. One with 3 small windows. Solid 



wood. $600.00 for the pair. 860-481-0029. 

                       



WANTED 

69-R. Transplant wheel harrow - 8’ or 10’. Crop sprayer – 3 pt 

or pull type. Working condition. 860-537-8890.  

                 



MISCELLANEOUS 

6-R. Farm/Land specializing in land, farms, and all types of 

Real Estate.  Established Broker with a lifetime of agricultural ex-

perience and 40 years of finance.  Representing both Buyers and 

Sellers.  Call Clint Charter of Wallace-Tustin Realty (860) 644-

5667. 


41-R. Bulldozing in Eastern Connecticut. Large farm ponds 

dug. Land clearing for farmers also a specialty. Work done with 

rootrake to preserve topsoil and remove rocks. Personal service. 

Will help with permits. Don Kemp 860-546-9500. 

 

   BIG E APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED  

 

The  Department of Agriculture is now accepting applications to 



showcase Connecticut Grown products, services, or agricultural 

commodities in the Connecticut Building at the upcoming Eastern 

State’s Exposition (Big E.)  

  The fair runs from Friday, September 18 to Sunday, October 4.  

Applications are due by Wednesday, July 15, at 3 p.m.  Applica-

tions are available for download at 

CTGrown.gov. 

Questions may 

be directed to 860-713-2503 or  

Rebecca.Eddy@ct.gov. 

 

                    (Continued from Page 1)  

their grandfather Steven Dzen, who raised potatoes, tobacco, 

and dairy cows. Their father, Donald Dzen Sr., expanded into 

strawberries and Christmas trees in the 1970s, and blueberries 

were planted around 1980. 

  The farm now totals about 400 acres, including 25 of strawber-

ries, 150 of pumpkins and 100 of Christmas trees. Rows for the 

blueberry bushes were cut with an angled disc harrow that creat-

ed a raised bed, essential to provide proper drainage.  

  The beds are covered in about 18 inches of wood mulch, which 

the farm gets for free by allowing tree-service companies to 

dump chips in an enormous pile that has accumulated at the en-

trance to the orchard. 

  “The raised bed and the mulch keeps the bushes from sitting in 

water,” Don explained. “Blueberry bushes like well-drained soil 

but they need a lot of water when they’re in fruit.” 

  Like many farmers, the Dzens say irrigation was crucial during 

a dry May. A relatively cool and moist June helped to size up the 

berries, which require about two inches of water a week.  

  Water is delivered by miles of drip irrigation lines snaking 

through the bushes. 

  “It is so much more efficient and economical than overhead 

spraying,” Joe said.     

  Another key move to increase crop yield was installing mesh 

netting over the orchard about five years ago to protect the fruit 

from being eaten by birds. They had tried various noisemakers 

over the years, but the birds eventually learned to ignore them.  

  Making the roughly $150,000 investment in poles and netting 

was daunting, Don Dzen said, “but we decided to bite the bullet 

because the last year we were uncovered the bird damage was 

terrible.”  

  When the final blueberry is picked and the netting taken down 

in late summer, the harvest may be over but orchard mainte-

nance and preparation for next season has only begun. Weeks 

are spent pruning the bushes, removing up to half the wood on 

each.   


   “You end up with a pretty big pile of branches in the rows,” Don 

said.  


  Wood mulch is spread over the raised beds in winter, an annual 

six-week chore for Joe. He uses an old mixing wagon with a side

-discharge implement that sprays the material along the rows. 

  Pest management is aided by several American Kestrels – the 

smallest member of the falcon family - that live in a half-dozen 

nesting boxes scattered around the farm.  

  The birds were introduced to the farm several years ago by 

Tom Sayers, a kestrel aficionado from Tolland working to ad-

dress a sharp decline in the birds’ population in Eastern states,   

mainly due to loss of habitat to housing development and a lack 

of naturally-occurring nesting cavities. 

  “They’re big insect-eaters and it’s a very ecologically-friendly 

part of our integrated pest management system,” Don said.  

  The farm has been certified by the agriculture department for its 

use of Good Agricultural Practices, which is based on a farm’s 

adherence to recommendations in the FDA’s Guide to Minimize 

Microbial Food Safety Hazards for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables. 

  Don and Joe say the improvements and efficiencies they’ve 

made are a tribute to the hard work of their father and grandfa-

ther in building the farm, and will hopefully set a path to future 

family success. 

  “The next generation is starting to show some interest,” Don 

said. “I remember my Dad starting a lot of this when I was a kid 

and that is something that I would definitely like to see continue.”  




   VOL. XCV, No. 22, June 2, 2015 

 

  VOL. XCV, No. 27, July 7, 2015



 

Clockwise from top left: The 20-acre blueberry orchard at 

Dzen farm is watered with miles of drip irrigation lines on top 

of raised beds; freshly-picked berries ready for sale at the 

family’s market in Ellington; an American Kestrel used for 

pest control; an enormous pile of mulch left by tree-service 

companies is spread in the orchard every winter.    

Yüklə 80,13 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə