The radical’s dilemma: an overview of the practice and prospects of Social and Public Labs



Yüklə 92,13 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix08.12.2017
ölçüsü92,13 Kb.
#14724


 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

The radical’s dilemma: an overview of the 

practice and prospects of Social and Public Labs 

– Version 1 

Geoff Mulgan, February 2014 

Nesta has a great interest in the work of labs – teams using experimental methods 

to  address  social  and  public  challenges.    We  host  the  70-strong  Innovation  Lab

which includes a joint team with the UK Cabinet Office, and programmes with local 

government and the health service as well as civil society.  In the early 2000s Nesta 

set up Futurelab working in education, and subsequently spun out, and we recently 

launched a joint venture to spin one of the most successful innovation labs out of 

government: the Behavioural Insights Team

We’ve  also  done  research  on  innovation  methods  and  labs  in  the  public  sector 

worldwide  (including  the  Open  Book  of  Social  Innovation  which  documented 

many  of  these,  and  a  forthcoming  study  with  Bloomberg  Philanthropies  on 

innovation  teams  (i-teams)  in  national,  regional  and  city  government).    And  we 

collaborate with other Labs and innovation teams around the world, through SIX

i

 

and other networks, sharing experiences and methods.  

This  note  summarises  a  personal  view  of  the  field  of  innovation  labs  -  and  what 

might lie ahead – largely based on Nesta experience.  It looks at the ways in which 

labs  need  to  be  both  insiders  and  outsiders  at  the  same  time  –  and  the  practical 

challenges  of  the  classic  ‘radical’s  dilemma’.    If  they  stand  too  much  inside  the 

system  they  risk  losing  their  radical  edge;  if  they  stand  too  far  outside  they  risk 

having little impact.   It follows that the most crucial skill they need to learn is how 

to  navigate  the  inherently  unstable  role  of  being  both  insiders  and  outsiders; 

campaigners and deliverers; visionaries and pragmatists. 

Background – what is a lab? 

Laboratories  developed  in  the  18th-19

th

  centuries  in  science  and  technology, 



bringing together systematic experiment, development and measurement of new 

ideas.  They offered a safe space for trying out ideas - before the successes were 

then  taken  out  into  the  world.      Since  then  labs  have  become  common  in 

chemistry, physics, electronics, and biology. Versions of labs are present in most 

schools. 

Some labs are deliberately very removed from real life.  But from an early date 

agricultural  labs  showed  how  labs  could  be  more  integrated  with  the  outside 



 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

world,  with  research  centres  like  Rothamsted  (set  up  in  the  mid-19



th

  century) 

providing an environment in which new crops and fertilisers, and combinations 

of the two, could be experimented with.  



History - The idea of applying similar principles to social issues gained ground in 

the  19


th

  century,  thanks  to  various  strands  of  positivism,  utopian  thinking  and 

reform.    The  proponents  believed  that  small  scale  experiments  could 

demonstrate the potential direction of social change, part of a broader movement 

of  utopian  ideas  (many  of  which  included  practical  expressions).  Robert  Owen, 

for  example,  saw  his  cooperatives,  schools  and  healthcare  in  19

th

  century 



Scotland  as  a  laboratory.

ii

    Later  on,  psychology  led  the  way  in  extending 



scientific lab methods into society, with many experimental labs in the late 19

th

 



century.    Other examples of labs for social change include the Musee Sociale in 

Paris in the 1890s. 



Theory - These labs developed alongside new theories which made the case for 

experimentalism  as  an  alternative  to  blueprints  –  from  John  Stuart  Mill’s 

advocacy of living experiments (and of the role of the state in providing space for 

people to experiment); to John Dewey’s arguments for practical experimentation 

in  education;  to  Karl  Popper’s  account  of  the  virtues  of  incremental 

experimentalism.    Popper  argued  that  experiment  was  preferable  to  top  down 

design of new institutions, economies and laws, because it allowed for evolution, 

adaptation and improvement on a small scale to improve ideas before they were 

generalised.  He also argued that one virtue of piecemeal social engineering was 

that  it  treated  each  new  issue  as  sui  generis,  and  not  as  the  basis  for 

generalisations.  Contemporary  theorists,  such  as  Roberto  Mangabeira  Unger, 

have drawn on the legacy of Dewey and others to show how experimentalism can 

form part of a much more ambitious approach to politics in the 21

st

 century.



iii

 

Words -  There is no shared definition of what constitutes a social or public lab, 

though  it  might  be  expected  to  include  experimentation  in  a  safe  space  at  one 

remove from everyday reality, with the goal of generating useful ideas that address 

social needs and demonstrating their effectiveness.   

However, sometimes the word ‘laboratories’ is used metaphorically.   States and 

cities are often described as laboratories of reform (in the 1930s the US Supreme 

Court  Justice  Brandeis  wrote  that  a  ‘state may,  if  its  citizens  choose,  serve  as  a 

laboratory;  and  try  novel  social  and  economic  experiments  without  risk  to  the 

rest  of  the  country’).    The  word  is  also  currently  being  used  by  many 

organisations which look more like consultancies or events organisers.  A quick 

google search also finds dozens of other organisations using the language of labs 




 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

or social labs to describe everything from brand development and marketing to 



facilitation.  Here  I  use  it  more  precisely  to  describe  institutions  using 

experimental methods to design or discover new ways of working that address 

social and public needs. 

The landscape of public and social labs 

There are now many different kinds of lab applying method to social problems or 

public  sector.    Some  can  be  found  in  universities  in  relation  to  social  action, 

research,  experimentation,  and  a  new  generation  of  social  science  parks  looks 

likely to take this into new fields, such as computational social science.    

There  are  several  hundred  ‘living  labs’,  mainly  technology  based,  and  enabling 

some  user  input  to  shaping  technologies.  More  recently,  labs  of  various  kinds 

have  spread  into  governments,  some  using  design  methods,  some  focused  on 

data, or using challenges to elicit ideas.    Many of these were documented in the 

Open  Book  of  Social  Innovation;  a  more  thorough  study  of  public  sector  ones  is 

coming out shortly in the forthcoming Nesta/Bloomberg Philanthopies research 

study on i-teams.  Other useful overviews include one prepared by SIG/MaRS,

iv

  



and a Parsons-prepared visual graphic.

v

   



All of the labs described below focus on the first three stages of the innovation 

spiral  summarised  below  –  better  understanding  needs  and  opportunities; 

generating  ideas;  and  testing  them  in  practice.        Labs  don’t  usually  include 

capacities to take ideas on into implementation and scale.  Some are closely tied 

into  big  institutions  with  power  and  money,  others  have  very  few  means  to 

spread their best ideas. But most aspire to influence whole systems and not just  

generate ideas. 



 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

 

 



Labs can be distinguished on several main axes: 

 



By the main method they use (design, data, behavioural economics, hybrid 

&c) 


 

By  the  field  in  which  they  work  (education  and  healthcare  to 



development)  

 



By where they focus along the journey from upstream to downstream (ie 

from  understanding  issues,  through  generating  ideas  to  implementation 

and scale) 

 



By  how  they  work:  whether  they  innovate  themselves  (eg  running 

experiments),  advise,  use  open  innovation  methods,  or  primarily  work 

through funding others. 

 



By the extent to which they are directly involved with government – from 

labs  within  governments,  to  ones  at  arms-length  and  others  wholly 

separate 

These  variables  can  be  mixed  in  almost  any  combination  –  though  a  more 

thorough research of labs would show particular clusters. 

 Methods for Labs 

The simplest way to differentiate Labs is through the first of these variables – the 

distinctive methods they use. These are some of the main ones: 




 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

DESIGN:  these  labs  try  to  introduce  design  thinking  into  government  or  civil 



society.  They include Mindlab, the Human Experience Lab in Singapore, TACSI in 

Adelaide,  the  relatively  short-lived  Helsinki  Design  Lab    and  DesignGov  in 

Australia, Futuregov in the UK, and others such as Region 27 in France.   Others 

using  design  methods  but  less  oriented  to  government  include  the Institute 

without  Boundaries and Stanford’s  Design  for  Change  Lab.  There  has  been  a 

steady  growth  in  the  number  of  labs  using  design  methods  despite  some 

setbacks.    Design  approaches  provide  a  very  useful  complement  to  traditional 

bureaucratic, top down policy methods.   As I’ve shown elsewhere some elements 

of design thinking are not unique to design – the use of ethnography and citizen 

input;  rapid  prototyping  etc  -    but  can  still  be  powerful.

vi

    Others  –  notably 



visualisation techniques – are much newer, and introduce very different insights 

to fields predominantly based on text and numbers.   

CITIZEN-LED  IDEAS  INCUBATORS:      another  group  of  labs  share  many  similar 

methods, and see themselves as incubators of ideas derived from citizens rather 

than experts.  These often use a mix of tools – from engagement methods to rapid 

implementation,  some  drawing  on  the  traditions  of  intermediate  technology.  

Many of the organisations or programmes called ‘Social Innovation Labs’ are of 

this kind – such as the SILs set up by OASIS in India,  BRAC’s Social Innovation 

Lab  in  Bangladesh,  MaRS  Solution  Lab  in  Toronto,  the  Lien  Centre’s  Social 

Collaboratory in Singapore, the Sociallab in Chile, or the Goodlab in Hong Kong.  

Often there is a strong ethos of empowerment. 

DATA AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY: Another group of labs emphasise data, with 

many  brought  together  in  the  Open  Government  Partnership.    These  include 

Code for America and the teams around its various fellows, groups like the Office 

for Urban Mechanics in Boston, ODI in the UK, and the team around the new CIO 

in Mexico.  These various datalabs have  yet to take a stable form but generally 

involve  small  teams  of  programmers  working  with  public  servants,  or  civil 

society, to design new ways of combining public data or developing web-based 

services.

vii


   Other labs have a broader remit to innovate in digital tools – such as 

MySociety in the UK.  The Living Labs are a related group which primarily focus 

on developing new technologies with some involvement of users.  Across Europe 

there  are  also  many  Living  Labs  receiving  public  funding,  usually  from  R&D 

programmes  and  linked  in  the  European Network of Living Labs.    The  Global 

Living  Labs  organisation,  now  established  as  private  company,  has  a  more 

commercial  approach,  working  mainly  with  city  administrations  helping  them 

procure technology-based solutions. 




 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

EXPERIMENT-BASED/PSYCHOLOGY:  these  labs  emphasise  the  use  of  formal 



experiments.  J-PAL based in the US is a good example, primarily running RCTs in 

development.   A prime example of a lab based on psychology is the Behavioural 

Insights Team,  recently spun out of the UK government into a partnership with 

Nesta,  and  emulated  in  the  US  and  Singapore.    These  are  labs  in  quite  a  strict 

sense in that they run experimental trials, and pay attention to data.   

ORGANISATION-BASED:  these are Labs working within a single organisation to 

generate  new  ideas  and  options.  UNICEF’s  Labs  in  Kosovo,  Uganda,  Zimbabwe, 

and Copenhagen are good current examples.

 viii

 

PROCESS-ORIENTED  LABS:    process-led  labs  use  multi-stakeholder  processes 



and  systemic  change  events  to  generate  ideas  and  build  coalitions  for  change.   

Various consultancies promote this approach including Forum for the Future and 

Reos Partners.

ix

 



FUNDING/HYBRID:    these  Labs  use  open  funding  methods  to  support  a  wide 

range  of  projects,  and  generally  use  a  range  of  different  methods.    Nesta’s 

Innovation  Lab  is  a  good  example  –  providing  intensive  support  both  to  small 

scale experiments and subsequent scaling up; supporting systemic innovation in 

localities; ‘rapid results’ methods; venture investment and acceleration; and tools 

to  promote  adoption  of  innovations.

x

    Other  more  hybrid  labs  include  Change 



Fusion  in  Thailand,  Kennisland  in  the  Netherlands,  and  the  Hope  Institute  in 

Korea. 


INCUBATORS/ACCELERATORS:    these  Labs  overlap  with  the  many  commercial 

and social accelerators and incubators around the world.  They aim to create new 

ventures, or offshoots of existing firms, that address social needs, for example in 

health.      Some  focus  on  intensive  support  for  cohorts  of  start-ups,  with  the 

primary  aim  of  getting  them  ready  for  follow  on  funding,  and  in  some  cases 

contracts.    Nesta  will  soon  publish  a  ‘Field  Guide  to  Accelerators’  drawing  on 

global best practice. 

Sector-based labs 

There are many labs defined more by the field of operation. For example: 

 

In  education,  Futurelab  in  the  UK  was  a  spinout  from  Nesta  focused  on 



educational  technology,  which  operated  throughout  the  2000s.      Other 

examples include the Innovation Unit (a spinout from the Department for 

Education), New York’s education I-zone, and the lab created by the Office 

of Personnel Management in the US Federal Government.  




 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 



 



In  health  there  are  many  examples,  including  the  Institute  of  Health 

Improvement in the US and MIT Agelab, and in the UK, the NHS Innovation 

Institute, Health Launchpad and the NHS Regional Innovation Funds. 

A systematic survey would undoubtedly find hundreds of these more specialised 

labs working in different fields. 

 

The state of knowledge and craft 

The social and public labs have much less history to draw on than labs in science 

and  technology.    So  far  there  has  been  little  serious  assessment  of  the 

effectiveness  of  different  methods.    Many  labs  are  run  by  enthusiasts  for 

particular methods, and see their role more as advocacy than testing.   Some can 

point  to  the  impact  achieved  by  particular  projects  and  programmes,  but  few 

have yet had any independent validation of their claims.   

A  series  of  recent  meetings  have  brought  together  many  labs  to  share 

experiences and insights (eg hosted by Kennisland, MaRS, SITRA, SIX and others), 

and the craft knowledge of the field is advancing fast, helped by a strong ethos of 

learning and honesty and some helpful recent books.

xi

      


The  discussions  have  highlighted  a  series  of  critical  challenges  for  many  of  the 

labs: 


 

Efficacy  of  method  –  there  is  a  great  deal  of  experiment  underway  with 

methods, and some convergence:  linking  work to big systemic problems; 

close engagement of  the people most affected by those issues;  co-design; 

fast prototyping; and bringing together coalitions of supporters.  This mix 

of  methods  shows  the  scale  of  ambition  of  many  labs.    But  the  tricky 

questions  mainly  flow  from  the  scale  of  ambition:    i)  the  timescales 

necessary for achieving significant change on this scale; ii) the very wide 

range  of  skills  needed  to  influence  the  conditions  for  systems  to  change; 

iii)  the  issues  of  power  and  politics  raised  by  more  radical  ideas.    More 

modest  lab  models  may  have  a  higher  chance  of  success:  for  example 

generating new service models within existing NGOs or professions. 

  



 



Model  of  impact  and  scale  -    many  scientific  Labs  exist  within  larger 

organisations  which  have  mature  systems  for  adoption  and  scale  (eg  the 

classic  examples  like  Bell  Labs,  or  university  based  labs  developing  new 

biotechnology solutions). Most social innovation Labs by contrast are not 




 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

sufficiently  linked  into  systems  of  investment,  scale  and  adoption,  and 



therefore  risk  generating  interesting  ideas  with  little  prospect  for 

implementation.  A  lot of attention has been paid recently to  this issue  – 

for example, improving the incentives for existing public services to adopt 

promising or proven new innovations. 

 

 



 

Demonstrating  success.    Many  Labs  think  of  their  work  in  terms  of 

demonstration – showing a new method in the hope that this will lead to 

take up by others. All implicitly aim to catalyse demonstrable change.  Yet 

it is inherently hard to prove the overall impact of a lab’s work, let alone 

value for money (a problem shared by parallel organisations like the MIT 

Media Lab).   Case studies can show the successful growth and spread of 

new ideas – but most really transformative ideas are likely to take 10-20 

years to spread (digital platforms are the exception rather than the rule).

xii

  

So the most obvious – if imperfect – short-term metric of success is being 



seen to be useful by key holders of power and resources.  

 

Labs and the ‘radical’s dilemma’ 

Perhaps the fundamental challenge facing labs is the classic ‘radical’s dilemma’ – 

do you work from the outside to create a coherent alternative to the status quo, 

but risk being ignored and marginalised; or do you work within the system and 

directly influence the levers of power, but risk being co-opted and shifted from 

radical to incremental change? 

Some of the Labs seek to combine top down and bottom up, inside and outside – 

and this must be the right route to attempt. But it requires a great deal of subtlety 

–  mobilising  champions  and  advocates  within  power  structures  while  also 

experimenting  outside;  orchestrating  small  scale  evidence  and  showing  its 

relevance  to  the  larger  scale  issues.    There  is,  inevitably,  no  simple  formula. 

Indeed, this bridging of inside and outside is inherently unstable because of the 

range of variables involved.  

I  prepared  a  simple  chart  on  these  dilemmas  in  relation  to  systemic  change  – 

more to map the options rather than to prescribe answers, which are bound to 

vary depending on the state of the field. 

 



 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

 

Future evolution 



It’s  likely  that  the  demand  for  innovation  in  public  sectors,  civil  society  and 

around complex problems will continue to grow, and that in response  labs will 

continue evolving.   

The ones based on method are likely to become more sophisticated in their use of 

methods and demonstration of results; augmenting their core methods (eg data 

or  design)  with  other  methods  to  improve  impact  (eg  knowledge  of  policy, 

economics,  organisational  design).    Some  may  become  brand  leaders  globally 

(eg for design, data, behavioural insights etc). 

We should expect more sophistication in addressing the radical’s dilemma and 

managing  roles  which  straddle  inside  and  outside:    how  to  bring  in  supporters 

and champions; how to organise innovation in ways that improve the chances of 

adoption of ideas; how to advocate systemic change, and so on. 

Some labs will continue to focus primarily on problem solving and use a range 

of  methods  according  to  the  nature  of  the  problem,  based  on  more  generic 

innovation skills (the approach taken by Nesta).   



 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

We  should  expect  more  labs  to  take  an  explicitly  experimental  approach  –  ie 



testing  multiple  approaches  and  using  rigorous  measurement  to  judge  what 

works with control groups (while hopefully avoiding the more simplistic faith in 

RCTs as a universal panacea). 

Some  may  develop  place-based  testbeds,  with  towns  or  cities  serving  as  more 

overt laboratories for change. 

And  we  should  expect  many  labs  to  be  set  up  within  existing  organisations 

(such as global NGOs) or networks of organisations (eg in fields such as childcare 

or  drugs  treatment),  potentially  sacrificing  radicalism  for  better  prospects  of 

seeing ideas taken up. 

The  field  as  a  whole  will  also  hopefully  gather  more  insights  into  practical 

questions, such as what scale is optimal; what scope of work is ideal (eg how 

many  different  projects  or  types  of  project  at  any  one  time?);  how  to  organise 



performance management and assess projects at different stages

xiii


; or how to 

handle  failure  and  get  the  right  balance  between  a  healthy  openness  to  learn 

from  failure,  and  the  risk  of  making  failure  so  acceptable  that  people  don’t 

struggle through to success?    

If  Labs  spread  we  should  also  expect  more  attention  to  the  ethics  of 

experimentation,  since  there  are  very  important  issues  of  handling  risk  and 

consent involved, far more than with consumer products.

xiv

 

Finally, there is the question of the relationships to politics – how much can or 



should  labs  work  within  explicit  political  priorities  to  help  politicians  shape 

future programmes, and how much should they seek to be insulated?   When they 

generate  radical  ideas,  how  much  should  Labs  move  into  campaigning  and 

advocacy?    How  much  could  Labs  become  part  of  the  mainstream  toolkit  of 

Mayors and Ministers? 

There will be many different, and valid, answers to these questions.  But this feels 

like  a  good  time  for  labs  to  share  experiences;  to  interrogate  each  others’ 

methods; and to move beyond advocacy to deepening effectiveness and impact. 

 



 

Geoff Mulgan – Social and Public Labs, 2014 – Version 1 

 

 

                                                           



i

 SIX is the Social Innovation Exchange;  www.socialinnovationexchange.org and 

Social Innovation Europe. 

ii

 My book ‘The Locust and the Bee’ includes a chapter on utopian experimentation 



in the 19

th

 and 20



th

 centuries, and shows how many bold utopians also put their 

ideas into practice. 

iii


 See his recent talk to the Social Frontiers Conference in London 2013, probably 

the most ambitious account of the maximalist approach to social innovation 

iv

 WISIR paper “What is a Design Lab?,” the SiG@MaRS report “Labs:  Designing 



the Future 

v

  http://nyc.pubcollab.org/files/Gov_Innovation_Labs-Constellation_1.0.pdf 



vi

 http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/design-public-and-social-innovation 

vii

  At  Nesta  we’ve  published  a  series  of  blogs  on  how  the  methods  used  by 



datalabs can become more effective  – in particular by paying more attention to 

demand and use, and how ideas can progress along the innovation spiral. 

viii

http://www.unicefinnovationlabs.org/wp-



content/uploads/2012/12/DIY_Guide_v1_interactive.pdf    is  UNICEF’s  guide  to 

creating new labs 

ix

 See Zaid Hassan, The Social Labs Revolution, 2014, which eloquently describes 



some of the projects done by Reos Partners. 

x

 http://www.nesta.org.uk/blog/how-run-lab-making-better-funding-decisions 



and other blogs set out the practical lessons from Nesta’s experience 

xi

 Christian Bason,  Leading Public Sector Innovation: Co-Creating for a Better 



Society, Policy Press 2010;  In studio; recipes for systemic change, Helsinki 

Design Lab/SITRA, 2011 

xii

  See  Nesta’s  overview  of  performance  management  which  discusses  the 



practical challenges of measuring success in Labs and similar organisations 

xiii


  This paper sets out how Nesta approaches this challenge: 

http://www.nesta.org.uk/publications/performance-management-and-

reporting 

xiv


 A few years ago I tried to articulate some of the principles which might guide 

risk management around social experiments, including reversibility, choice, how 



grounded in existing evidence, the costs of inaction &c. 


Yüklə 92,13 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə