58 (2008) pp. 187–192 xrom and rcom: Two New ogle-iii real Time Data Analysis Systems



Yüklə 40.78 Kb.

tarix05.03.2018
ölçüsü40.78 Kb.
:


ACTA ASTRONOMICA

Vol. 58 (2008) pp. 187–192



XROM and RCOM:

Two New OGLE-III Real Time Data Analysis Systems

A. U d a l s k i

Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa, Poland

e-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl



Received September 29, 2008

ABSTRACT


We describe two new OGLE-III real time data analysis systems: XROM and RCOM. The XROM

system has been designed to provide continuous real time photometric monitoring of the optical

counterparts of X-ray sources while RCOM system provides real time photometry of R Coronae

Borealis variable stars located in the OGLE-III fields. Both systems can be used for triggering follow-

up observations in crucial phases of variability episodes of monitored objects.

Key words: Surveys – Techniques: photometric – X-rays: stars – Stars: AGB and post-AGB

1.

Introduction

The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) is a long term large

scale sky survey regularly monitoring the most dense stellar fields in the sky (Udal-

ski et al. 1992, Udalski, Kubiak and Szyma´nski 1997, Udalski 2003). The OGLE

project started originally in 1992 as a first generation microlensing survey and con-

tributed in its subsequent phases to many fields of modern astrophysics like stel-

lar astrophysics, extrasolar planet searches, gravitational lensing and others. Huge

databases of photometric measurements of hundreds of millions stars spanning sev-

eral years provide a unique opportunity for data mining, performing statistical an-

alyzes of huge samples of particular objects or conducting analysis of long term

behavior of selected classes of stars.

One of the most important results of the OGLE survey was the implementation

of real time data analysis systems that allow monitoring of selected variable objects

in almost real time. Advantages of this approach are obvious, especially in the case

of transient or non-periodic variable objects. For instance, one can carefully prepare

different kind of follow-up observations, knowing current photometric behavior of

a selected object. Microlensing field is the best example here. The OGLE project

was the first to implement the so called Early Warning System (EWS, Udalski et




188

A. A.

al. 1994) – the system that detected on-going microlensing events in their early

phases. Information on such events was made public. Several microlensing follow-

up teams were formed in the several past years to observe intensively the already

discovered ongoing microlensing phenomena. This strategy turned out to be very

successful leading to the important discoveries like microlensing extrasolar planets

(Udalski et al. 2005, Beaulieu et al. 2006, Gould et al. 2006, Gaudi et al. 2008) or

Magellanic Cloud microlensings (Afonso et al. 2000, Dong et al. 2007).

OGLE-III phase of the OGLE project, that started on June 12, 2001 and has

been conducted up to now, was a significant extension of the OGLE survey. Much

larger observing capabilities made it possible to cover practically entire area of the

LMC and SMC and large fraction of the Galactic bulge. Also new data analysis

systems were implemented during this phase (Udalski 2003). Beside the EWS

system allowing the discovery of about 600 microlensing events every year, two

new systems were developed after the first four seasons of the OGLE-III phase:

EEWS and NOOS.

The EEWS system was designed to detect in the real time anomalies of mi-

crolensing events from a single mass microlensing. The implementation of this

system became an important step – thanks to it the vast majority of non-standard

microlensing events, including many planetary microlensings, were detected in al-

most real time and the information was passed to other microlensing groups. EEWS

system also allowed to switch the OGLE observing mode from the standard survey

mode to follow up mode where the observations of a particular object were done

with much higher cadence – dependent on the variability rate.

The second real time system NOOS (Udalski 2003) was designed to detect in

real time the transient stellar objects that brighten strongly enough to be seen in

the OGLE images for some time. This class of objects include supernovae (SNe),

long term variable stars, microlensing of very faint stars (non-detectable in the

regular OGLE photometry range) etc. A few new SNe were detected soon after the

implementation of this system (Udalski 2004).

Finally, the real time monitoring of the Einstein Cross gravitational lens (QSO

2237+0305) provides the real time photometry of four images of the quasar. This

object is one of the most important gravitational lenses and unique OGLE photo-

metric dataset (Wo´zniak et al. 2000, Udalski et al. 2006) was often used for its

modeling. Continuous monitoring of the quasar images allows early detection of

potential caustic crossings or cusp approaches in this lens. These events are cru-

cial for proper modeling and understanding the gravitational lenses and provide an

opportunity to estimate the quasar size.

In this note we present two new real time OGLE-III data analysis systems

implemented recently: XROM and RCOM. They allow real time monitoring of

selected classes of highly variable optical objects. The photometry provided by

these systems is available to the astronomical community from the OGLE Internet

archive.



Vol. 58

189


2.

XROM: X-Ray Variables OGLE Monitoring System

X-ray astronomy is one of the most rapidly developing branches of modern as-

trophysics. New space missions provide more and more exciting data in this wave-

lenght range and the data flow accelerates. Nevertheless in the majority of cases

the proper interpretation of observed X-ray behavior of detected objects requires

observations in other wavelengths as well, including the optical range.

The dense OGLE-III fields like the Magellanic Clouds or Galactic bulge in-

clude many X-ray sources. Part of them has been successfully identified with the

optical counterparts. For example, the SMC contains a large sample of X-ray pul-

sars discovered during the past few years (Coe et al. 2005). OGLE data has already

been used for interpretation of some of these objects (Coe et al. 2005, McGowan et

al. 2008).

Continuous optical monitoring of counterparts of X-ray sources is very impor-

tant, as many of them undergo large optical variations, eruptions etc. likely related

to the X-ray activity. Therefore, many planned X-ray follow-up observations may

be much better tuned-up when the current optical state and behavior of these objects

is known.

2500

3000


3500

4000


4500

15

14.8



14.6

14.4


14.2

14

SXP756



HJD - 2450000

I magn


itude

Fig. 1. Light curve of the X-ray pulsar SXP 756.

The OGLE-III XROM system provides continuous photometric coverage of

a selected sample of known optical counterparts of X-ray sources located in the

OGLE-III fields. The initial sample contains 52 objects. It can be easily extended

with other or newly detected objects. Photometry of the XROM objects is typically

updated after each clear night. Fig. 1 presents the OGLE-III light curve of one of

such objects: SXP 756.




190

A. A.

The interactive access to the XROM objects is provided via the main OGLE

WWW page:

http://ogle.astrouw.edu.pl

The structure of the page is similar to other OGLE real time system pages. After

selecting an object, the object page is invoked providing the basic information: its

OGLE identification, RA/DEC coordinates, finding chart and two light curve plots:

one showing the entire light curve and the second one showing the last 60 days.

The photometry is obtained through the I-filter and it is only roughly calibrated

with accuracy of the zero points of ±0

.1−0.2 mag.

The photometry can be download from the OGLE archive:

ftp://ftp.astrouw.edu.pl/ogle3/xrom

3.

RCOM: OGLE Real Time Monitoring of R CrB Variable Stars

R CrB stars form a group of stars that reveal dramatic variability episodes.

Their brightness can fade by a few magnitudes in the time scale of several days.

These fading episodes are unpredictable and can last for months. After that period

the brightness of these stars gradually recovers to the original state.

2500


3000

3500


4000

4500


20

18

16



14

MACHO-051551.8-691008

HJD - 2450000

I magn


itu

de

Fig. 2. Light curve of the R CrB type star, MACHO-051551.8-691008, monitored by the OGLE-III



CROM system.

It is believed that fading is related to the formation of dust clouds over the

surface of these stars. When they disperse the brightness returns to the unobscured



Vol. 58

191


level. Some such clouds were directly observed. R CrB variables are very small

group of stars – only about 50 is known in the Galaxy (Tisserand et al. 2008) and

about 20 in the Magellanic Clouds (Alcock et al. 2001, Tisserand et al. 2004).

R CrB stars provide an opportunity of studying the late stages of stellar evo-

lution. To clarify their evolutionary status extensive follow-up observations are

needed in the most dramatic fading or rising phases of the variability episodes. As

the episodes are unpredictable only continuous observations of R CrB variables

may trigger such follow-up programs.

OGLE-III fields are ideal for the real time data analysis system monitoring

R CrB variables. They contain many R CrB stars, both in the Magellanic Clouds

and the Galactic bulge. The RCOM system was designed to continuously monitor

a sample of R CrB stars from the OGLE-III fields. Initially the sample consists of

23 objects but it can be extended when the new objects are detected. Unfortunately

most of the known R CrB stars in the Galactic bulge are saturated in the OGLE-

III reference images, therefore their photometry is not available. Fig. 2 shows an

example of the light curve of one of the R CrB objects monitored by the CROM

system, MACHO-051551.8-691008.

The interactive access to the RCOM objects is provided via the main OGLE

WWW page:

http://ogle.astrouw.edu.pl

The structure of the page and provided information are identical as for the

XROM system.

The photometry can be download from the OGLE archive:



ftp://ftp.astrouw.edu.pl/ogle3/rcom

Acknowledgements. This paper was partially supported by the Polish MNiSW

grant N20303032/4275. We thank Drs. Malcolm Coe, Matthew Schurch and Peter

Cottrell for encouraging us to design and implement presented systems.

REFERENCES

Afonso, C. et al. 2000, ApJ532, 340.

Alcock, C., Allsman, R. A., Alves, D. R. et al. 2001, ApJ554, 298.

Beaulieu, J.-P. et al. 2006, Nature439, 437.

Coe, M.J., Edge, W.R.T., Galache, J.L., and McBride, V.A. 2005, MNRAS356, 502.

Dong, S., Udalski, A., Gould, A. et al. 2007, ApJ664, 862.

Gaudi, B.S., Bennett, D.P., Udalski, A. et al. 2008, Science319, 927.

Gould, A., Udalski, A., An, D. et al. 2006, ApJ644, L37.

McGovan, K.E., Coe, M.J., Schurch, M.P.E.; Corbet, R.H.D., Galache, J.L., and Udalski, A. 2008,



MNRAS384, 821.

Tisserand, P. et al. 2004, A&A424, 245.




192

A. A.

Tisserand, P. et al. 2008, A&A481, 673.

Udalski, A., Szyma´nski, M.; Kału˙zny, J., Kubiak, M., Mateo, M. 1992, Acta Astron.42, 253.

Udalski, A., Szyma´nski, M., Kału˙zny, J., Kubiak, M., Mateo, M., Krzemi´nski, W., and Paczy´nski, B.

1994, Acta Astron.44, 227.

Udalski, A., Kubiak, M., and Szyma´nski, M. 1997, Acta Astron.47, 319.

Udalski, A. 2003, Acta Astron.53, 291.

Udalski, A. 2004, IAUC, 8276.

Udalski, A., Jaroszy ´nski, M., Paczy´nski, B. et al. 2005, ApJ628, 109.

Udalski, A. et al. 2006, Acta Astron.56, 293.

Wo´zniak, P.R., Alard, C., Udalski, A., Szyma´nski, M., Kubiak. M., Pietrzy´nski, G., and ˙

Zebru ´n, K.



2000, ApJ529, 88.


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə