Charles Kurzman The Qum Protests and the Coming of the



Yüklə 340,95 Kb.

səhifə1/15
tarix21.04.2018
ölçüsü340,95 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   15


Charles Kurzman

The Qum Protests and the Coming of the

Iranian Revolution, 1975 and 1978

In June 1975 and January 1978, seminary students in the shrine city of Qum, Iran,

staged public protests against the regime of Shah Muhammad Riza Pahlavi. In both

instances security forces forcibly suppressed the protests. Yet the first incident gener-

ated almost no public outcry, while the second incident echoed throughout Iran and

quickly became a rallying point for revolutionary mobilization. What was different

about Iran in mid-1975 and early 1978 that might account for these different reactions?

This article examines three widely credited explanations: economic downturn, widening

political opportunity, and organizational mobilization of the opposition. The exami-

nation of economic and political explanations uncovered little evidence of significant

differences between the two time periods; organizational explanations, by contrast,

accounted for significant shifts in 1977 among the moderate and Islamist opposition,

with the Islamist opposition in particular exhibiting a sense of optimism and efficacy

in the weeks before January 1978. This changed self-perception appears to be the most

likely explanation for the wave of protest that followed the suppression of the Qum

protest of January 1978.

Qum Protest 1975

On the eve of 5 June 1975, the anniversary of violently repressed protests in

1963, seminary students gathered for commemorative services at the Fayzi-

yah Seminary in Qum, Iran, and raised chants for Ayatullah al- Uzma (Great

Sign of God) Ruhullah Khomeini.

1

This was a significant event, as pub-



lic mention of Khomeini, the leader of the 1963 protests, had been banned

since he was exiled in 1964. Anti-shah demonstrations, planned by the stu-

Social Science History 27:3 (fall 2003), 287–325

Copyright © 2003 by the Social Science History Association




288

Social Science History

dents in advance, began in the seminary’s central courtyard after evening

prayers.


2

Security forces, apparently prepared for such an event, surrounded

the seminary and prevented the students from taking their demonstration

to the streets. Into the evening and throughout the next days, with crowds

supportive of the protestors gathering around the seminary, security forces

lobbed tear gas into the courtyard and alternately ordered the students out

and forced them with a water cannon to stay in. On one occasion, the secu-

rity forces tried to gain entrance to the seminary via neighboring rooftops

but were beaten back by students throwing bricks and rocks.

On 7 June, the ranking officer in Qum telephoned a leading religious

scholar, Ayatullah Kazim Shari at-Madari, asking him to mediate. Shari at-

Madari did not respond (Guzarish-i kamil 1976: 6). As the day drew on and

military reinforcements arrived in Qum, the students inside the Fayziyah

Seminary also sought mediators. They telephoned the religious leaders of

Qum but received little assistance, aside from food. One religious leader sent

a representative to speak with the protestors but only to recommend that they

make a deal with the authorities to avoid arrest.

3

The leaders of the semi-



naries feared that protests would undermine ‘‘the protection of the religious

circle’s position,’’ Shaykh Murtaza Ha iri explained the next day.

4

Protest was



futile, as one (unnamed) religious leader told a delegation of students: the

world is run by two powers, the West and the Communist East, and ‘‘we here

are only a tool in their hands. They will not allow us to come to power. These

boys [the seminary students] will only be sacrificed.’’

5

At noon, the city of Qum shut down in a sympathy strike. In the after-



noon, further military forces arrived, their presence announced by a military

helicopter that flew in low over the seminary. The students continued their

protests and hung out a large red banner, written in bad handwriting (inten-

tionally, so the authors would not be identified) and praising Khomeini and

the 1963 uprising. Red symbolized the blood of martyrs, they later explained,

chagrined that the color was widely taken as sympathy for communism.

6

In the afternoon of 7 June, security forces moved the crowd away from



the seminary in preparation for an assault on the building. Through a loud-

speaker, the chief of police issued a warning to the students, instructing them

to stay in their rooms, and at dusk, several hundred commandos attacked

via neighboring rooftops. Some students resisted with sticks and stones for

half an hour. The authorities continued to beat students for another hour

while at the same time breaking all the windows and doors in the seminary.




The Qum Protests and the Coming of the Iranian Revolution

289


Secret police records indicate that there were more than 200 arrests.

7

Stu-



dents reported that they were beaten again while in custody at the police

station (Shirkhani 1998a).

We can be reasonably certain, in hindsight, that there were no fatalities,

8

but ‘‘rumors of deaths spread quickly’’ at the time. ‘‘Eight were said to have



been killed directly, five others to have been hospitalized in critical condition’’

(Fischer 1980: 125). Commandos were said to have thrown several students

off the roof to their deaths and then to have loaded the bodies into police and

gendarmerie vehicles so that casualties could not be counted.

9

Khomeini, dis-



cussing the incident from exile in a pronouncement of 11 July 1975, spoke of

45 dead.


10

The shah considered the incident serious enough to make a public

statement attributing this ‘‘ugly and filthy’’ event to ‘‘the unholy alliance of

black reactionist[s] and stateless Reds’’ (New York Times, 11 June 1975, 10).

Authorities shut the Fayziyah Seminary. It was still closed, a vivid reminder

of state power, during the seminary student protests of January 1978.

Qum Protest 1978

On 7 January 1978, Ittila at [The news], an afternoon newspaper in Teh-

ran, published an insulting profile of Khomeini by a pseudonymous author.

‘‘These days,’’ the article began, ‘‘thoughts turn once again to the colonial-

ism of the black and the red, that is to say, to old and new colonialism.’’ The

alliance of the black and the red went looking for a clerical mouthpiece two

decades ago, the article continued, in order to dupe the devout. When the

plot ‘‘proved unsuccessful with the country’s high-ranking scholars, despite

special enticements,’’ there was only one man left for the job. ‘‘Ruhollah Kho-

meini was an appropriate agent for this purpose,’’ the article said, making a

rare reference to Khomeini in the Iranian press since his exile in 1964.

Reaching Qum at dusk on the seventh, the newspaper article immedi-

ately caused a stir. That evening, seminary students gathered, passed around

the article, and hand wrote copies to be posted about town—they could

not afford to buy copies of the paper on their spare student stipends, and

photocopying was not a safe activity for oppositionists in Qum. The stu-

dents added the addendum: ‘‘Tomorrow morning, as a protest, meeting at

the Khan Seminary.’’

11

Independently, eight radical scholars gathered late in



the evening to arrange a collective response to what they viewed as a slan-

derous article. ‘‘Something must be done,’’ a midranking scholar told his col-






Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   15


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə