Derya agiŞ Ph. D. student, Ankara University, Institute of Socal Sciences, Western Lan



Yüklə 133,23 Kb.

tarix19.07.2018
ölçüsü133,23 Kb.


idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

www.idildergisi.com

137

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



ABSTRACT

Amerigo Vespucci (1454-1512) wrote letters for depicting his four sea voyages to the Americas, 

thus ‘the New World’: he talked about the primitiveness of the natives, the animals specific to 

the region, and the plants that were used as foods or medicines by the natives in his letters to 

traders, politicians, family members, and navigators. Besides, Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) 

talked about different natives from some tropical regions in his work entitled Tristes tropiques 

(1955; A World on the Wane); moreover, he wrote Le Totémisme aujourd’hui (1962; Totemism) 

and Mythologiques in four volumes: Le Cru et le cuit (1964; The Raw and the Cooked), Du miel 

aux cendres (1966; From Honey to Ashes), L’Origine des manières de table (1968; The Origin of 

Table Manners), and L’Homme nu (1971; The Naked Man). As Vespucci depicted naked natives, 

their lack of a legal system, cures, totems, and eating habits as well as the status of native women 

in their societies, just like Lévi-Strauss, he might seem to have influenced Lévi-Strauss and the 

formation of structural anthropology. Consequently, this paper will compare Vespucci’s sixteenth 

century popular ethnographic descriptions to Lévi-Strauss’s twentieth century structural anthro-

pological analyses.

Derya AGİŞ

  Ph.D. student, Ankara University, Institute of Socal Sciences, Western Lan-

guages and Literatures, Department of Italian Language and Literature,  

e-mail. fdagis@ankara.edu.tr & deryaagis@gmail.com

AMERIGO VESPUCCI CLAUDE

 LÉVI-STRAUSS’A KARŞI: KİM EN İYİ DENİZ 

DÜNYASI ANTROPOLOĞU? 

 

AMERIGO VESPUCCI VERSUS CLAUDE 

LÉVI-STRAUSS: WHO IS THE BEST SEA WORLD 

ANTHROPOLOGIST?

Keywords:

Environmen-

tal humanities

ecological history, 

Amerigo Vespucci

structural anthro-

pology, Claude Lé-

vi-Strauss, South 

America

Anahtar kelimeler: 

Çevreci beşerî bil-

imler, ekolojik tarih, 

Amerigo Vespucci, 

yapısal antropoloji

Claude Lévi-Strauss, 

Güney Amerika

ÖZ

Amerigo Vespucci (1454-1512) ‘Yeni Dünya’ olarak bilinen Amerika kıtasına dört deniz yolculuğu 

gerçekleştirmiştir. Bu yolculuklar hakkında tüccarlara, politikacılara, aile üyelerine ve denizcil-

ere mektuplar yazmıştır. Bu mektuplarda yerlilerin ilkellliklerinden, Amerika kıtasına özgü hay-

vanlardan ve bu kıtada yaşayan yerlilerin yemek ya da ilaç olarak kullandıkları bitkilerden söz 

etmiştir. Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) ise Tristes tropiques (1955; [Üzgün Tropikler]) adlı es-

erinde tropikal bölgelerde yaşamakta olan yerlileri tasvir etmiştir. Lévi-Strauss’un Le Totémisme 

aujourd’hui (1962; [Günümüzde Totemizm]) ve Mythologiques adlı iki adet kitabı da vardır. My-

thologiques adlı eseri dört farklı seriden oluşur: Le Cru et le cuit (1964; [Ham ve Pişmiş]), Du 

miel aux cendres (1966; [Baldan Küllere]), L’Origine des manières de table (1968; [Sofra Adabının 

Kökeni]) ve L’Homme nu (1971; [Çıplak Adam]). Lévi-Strauss gibi Vespucci de yerlilerin giysiler-

inin ve hukuki sistemlerinin olmayışını, kadınların yerliler arasındaki konumunu, yerlilerin il-

açlarını, totemlerini ve yemek yeme alışkanlıklarını anlattığından Lévi-Strauss’u ve yapısal antro-

polojinin oluşumunu etkilemiş gibi görünebilir. Bu çalışma, Vespucci’nin 16. yüzyılda kaleme 

aldığı popüler etnografik tasvirlerini Lévi-Strauss’un 20. yüzyılda yaptığı yapısal antropolojik 

analizleri ile kıyaslar. 

Derya 

Agiş - 


Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr

opoloğu



www.idildergisi.com

idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

138

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



1. INTRODUCTION

This  paper  deals  with  the  letters  Amerigo  Ves-

pucci  (1454-1512)  wrote  for  depicting  his  voyages  to 

the Americas and compares the descriptions of Indians 

in  them  to  those  in  the  works  of  Claude  Lévi-Strauss 

(1908-2009). Vespucci was a Florentine trader; Lorenzo 

the  Magnificient  used  to  be  the  ruler  of  Florence  be-

tween 1469 and 1492, the year in which he passed away 

(Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 14). The Medici family was 

so  sacred  to  be  associated  with  the  “astrologer-kings 

who  followed  Christ’s  star  to  Bethlehem”  (Fernán-

dez-Armesto, 2007: 14). Amerigo had an extended Ital-

ian family (Fernández-Armesto, 2007 15). Lorenzo dei 

Medici’s brother Giuliano dei Medici was supposed to 

be  in  love  with  his  cousin-in-law  Simonetta  Vespucci 

(Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 16). Therefore, Amerigo Ves-

pucci’s  family  had  well-known,  prosperous,  and  rich 

connections. Amerigo Vespucci’s father and his oldest 

brother were notaries; Amerigo received his education 

and instruction from his uncle, called Giorgio Antonio: 

he was trained in poetry, history, philosophy, astrono-

my, and astrology (Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 20). Flo-

rentines  had  learned  about  geography  through  Ptole-

my’s work titled Geography since approximately 1397; 

Amerigo Vespucci’s interest in geography derives from 

this book (Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 21). 

Regarding his voyages, he departed twice on be-

half of Spain, and twice on behalf of Portugal: “on May 

10,  1497,  he  embarked  on  his  first  journey,  departing 

from Cadiz with a fleet of Spanish ships … the ships 

sailed through the West Indies and made their way to 

the mainland of Central America within approximately 

five weeks”; he might have discovered Venezuela and 

returned to Cadiz in October 1498 (“Amerigo Vespuc-

ci,” 2017).

In May 1499, he passed through the equator, saw 

Guyana, and explored the Brazilian coasts by discover-

ing the Amazon River and Cape St. Augustine (“Amer-

igo Vespucci,” 2017).

On May 14, 1501, Amerigo Vespucci went to Cape 

Verde for Portugal; he visited South America by sailing 

“from  Cape  São  Roque  to  Patagonia”  (“Amerigo  Ves-

pucci,” 2017). Accordingly, he found Rio de Janeiro and 

Rio de la Plata (“Amerigo Vespucci,” 2017).

On June 10, 1503, Amerigo Vespucci and Gonzal 

Coelho traveled again to Brazil; Amerigo Vespucci dis-

covered Bahia and the island of South Georgia during 

this voyage (“Amerigo Vespucci,” 2017).

Besides,  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  (1908-2009)  was  a 

“French social anthropologist” who inserted  structural-

ism into the field of anthropology for analyzing “cultur-

al systems (e.g., kinship and mythical systems) in terms 

of the structural relations among their elements” (The 

Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 2016). He studied 

philosophy  and  law at the University  of  Paris,  was  a 

teacher  in  a  secondary  school,  worked  as  a  professor 

of sociology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil from 

1934 through 1937, while conducting fieldwork with the 

Brazilian Indians; he became the chair of the social an-

thropology department at the Collège de France in 1959 

(The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 2016).

The data of this research are from the following 

works by Amerigo Vespucci and Claude Lévi-Strauss: 

on the one hand, Amerigo Vespucci wrote nine letters 

-about his voyages to the Americas and to the Brazilian 

coasts- that can be found in the following book: 

Vespucci,  Amerigo.  Cronache  Epistolari:  Lettere 

1476-1508. Compiler: Leandro Perini. Florence: Firenze 

University Press, 2013.  

Amerigo Vespucci’s letters in the book are listed 

below:

Amerigo Vespucci’s letter to his father Mr. Anasta-



gio Vespucci in Florence from Trebbio del Mugello writ-

ten on October 19, 1476 (pages: 3-4);

Amerigo Vespucci’s letter to the commissar of the 

duke of Mantua in Genova from Seville written on De-

cember 30, 1492 (page 87);

Amerigo Vespucci’s letter to Lorenzo di Pierfran-

cesco dei Medici from Seville written on July 28, 1500 

(pages: 88-101);

Amerigo Vespucci’s letter to Lorenzo di Piefrance-

sco dei Medici from Capo Verde on June 4, 1501 (pages: 

102-108);

Amerigo Vespucci’s letter to Lorenzo di Pierfran-

cesco  dei  Medici  from  Lisbon  written  in  1502  (pages: 

109-113);

Amerigo  Vespucci’s  letter  written  probably  in 

1502 to an anonymous Florentine (pages: 114-119);

Amerigo Vespucci’s letter to Lorenzo di Pierfran-

cesco dei Medici from Lisbon in 1502-1503. This letter is 

recognized as “Mundus Novus” [New World] (pages: 

120-135);

Derya 

Agiş - 


Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr

opoloğu



idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

www.idildergisi.com

139

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



Amerigo  Vespucci’s  letter  to  Pier  Soderini  from 

Lisbon on September 4, 1504 (pages: 136-165); and

Amerigo  Vespucci’s  letter  to  Cardinal  Francisco 

Jiménez de Cisneros from Seville on December 9, 1508 

(pages: 166-168).

On  the  other  hand,  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  wrote 

the following books about Brazilian Indians: a) Tristes 

tropiques (1955; A World on the Wane); b) Le Totémisme 

aujourd’hui (1962; Totemism), and c) Mythologiques in 

four volumes: 1) Le Cru et le cuit (1964; The Raw and the 

Cooked), 2) Du miel aux cendres (1966; From Honey to 

Ashes), 3) L’Origine des manières de table (1968; The Or-

igin of Table Manners), and 4) L’Homme nu (1971; The 

Naked Man).

This study differs from my previous study: Agiş, 

Fazıla Derya. “Peace Education, Environmentalism, and 

Amerigo Vespucci”. İdil 6.38 (2017): 2673-2684, since it 

compares descriptions of the Indians in Amerigo Ves-

pucci’s letters to those in the works written by Claude 

Lévi-Strauss, a structural anthropologist within the fra-

mework of structuralism, thus structural anthropology.

2. Method and Theoretical Framework: Structu-

ral Anthropology  

The  theory  of  structural  anthroropology  devel-

oped  by  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  is  chosen  for  analyz-

ing  both Amerigo  Vespucci’s  letters  and  the  works  of 

Claude  Lévi-Strauss.  This  theory  posits  that  cultural 

practices constitute systems among which one can cite 

narrating  mythologies,  forming  kinship  structures, 

cooking and serving food, and using languages; these 

systems are based on mental stuctures, or patterns, thus 

on ways of thinking of populations that can be universal 

(The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, 2014). Accord-

ingly,  structuralism  derives  from  Gestalt  psychology 

(Gestaltism) where patterns, thus parts of an object are 

smaller than the whole object, which should be taken 

into account totally (Briggs and Meyer, 2009). In linguis-

tics,  as  Ferdinand  de  Sausssure  suggested  in  the  late 

1920s, there are grammatical rules that the speakers of 

these languages employ implicitly; these rules form the 

whole language from a Gestalt-like perspective (Briggs 

and  Meyer,  2009).  In  anthropology,  similarly,  certain 

cultural practices that  certain populations are used to 

are parts of an entire culture that shall be depicted via 

binary oppositions, such as “hot-cold, male-female, cul-

ture-nature, and raw-cooked” (Briggs and Meyer, 2009). 

Structural  anthropologists  intend  to  conceive 

the symbolic meanings of cultural practices that are so 

implicit and learned that they can be regarded as cul-

ture-specific,  as  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  proposed  in  his 

book titled Structuralism and Ecology, which was pub-

lished in 1972 (Briggs and Meyer, 2009). 

Therefore, in this study, Amerigo Vespucci’s nar-

rations about Indians will be analyzed in terms of bina-

ry oppositions as suggested by Claude Lévi-Strauss.

3. Research Problem

This study investigates the letters of Amerigo Ves-

pucci and compares them to what Claude Lévi-Strauss 

suggested  in  terms  of  structural  anthropology  for  an-

swering the question if Amerigo Vespucci should be re-

garded as an ethnographer, or anthropologist alongside 

a voyager, geographer, and trader just like Claude Lévi-

Strauss.


4. Findings

4. 1. Healthy Life Conditions, Eating Habits, Herb-

al Cures, and Meals: Raw-Cooked and Hot-Cold

Amerigo  Vespucci  narrated  us  that  the  Indians 

were extremely healthy in his letter to Lorenzo di Pier-

francsco dei Medici from Lisbon in 1502, talking about 

the freshness of air in South America:

“Regarding the suitability of the land, I say that 

this land is very pleasant, tepid, and healthy, because 

we went on our ways on this land during those weather 

conditions, and 10 months passed; none of us died, and 

few of us became ill. As I said before, the people live a 

very long time here, they do not become ill; they never 

catch plague; nor do they suffer from respiratority dis-

orders; they die just for natural reasons, or for drown-

ing” (Vespucci, 2013: 113; my translation). 

As  well,  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  (1961:  96)  talked 

about  South American  Brazilian Amazon  forests,  in  a 

section titled “The New World”: 

“The  forest  differs  from  our  own  by  reason  of 

the  contrast  between  trunks  and  foliage.  The  leafage 

is darker and its nuances of green seem related rather 

to the mineral than to the vegetable world, and among 

minerals nearer to jade and tourmalin than to emerald 

and chrysolite. On the other hand, the trunks, white or 

grey in tone, stand out like dried bones against the dark 

background of the leaves. Too near to grasp the forest 

as a whole, I concentrated on details. Plants were more 

abundant than those we know in Europe. Leaves and 

Derya 


Agiş - 

Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr


opoloğu


www.idildergisi.com

idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

140

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



stalks seemed to have been cut out of sheet metal, so 

majestic was their bearing, so impervious, as it seemed, 

the splendid development of their forms. Seen from out-

side, it was as if Nature in those regions was of a differ-

ent order from the Nature we know: more absolute in its 

presence and its permanence.”

Amerigo  Vespucci  seems  to  be  the  precursor  of 

Claude Lévi-Strauss, as he talked about a perfect nature 

and the warmish weather South America: warmish, or 

tepid weather conditions are healthy enough for human 

beings who may not bear the cold or hot weather. The 

nature is a resource for long healthy lives according to 

Amerigo Vespucci and Claude Lévi-Strauss. Sometimes 

Amerigo Vespucci mentioned the freshness of weather 

in South America in his letters; as did he in his letter 

to Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco dei Medici written between 

1502 - 1503 from Lisbon: 

“The  weather  there  is  very  tepid  and  nice;  as  I 

learned from what they had narrated me, plague and 

illnesses  caused  by  polluted  air  do  not  exist  there;  if 

people do not die due to violence, they live a very long 

time: the reason for this is the fact that the winds always 

blow from the South there, and the wind we call Eurus 

is similar to Aquilon for us” (Vespucci, 2013: 132 – 133, 

my translation).

Eurus  is  the  wind  blowing  from  the  Southeast, 

whereas Aquilon is the wind blowing from the North 

(see Perini in Vespucci, 2013: 124). Moreover, the women 

could live until they would have become onehundred-

fifty  years  old,  rarely  caught  any  illnesses,  and  used 

herbal cures for recovering from some illnesses in these 

South  American  coastal  zones  (Vespucci,  2013:  132). 

Heat was a way to recovery from common cold accord-

ing to Amerigo Vespucci’s Indians, as they would wash 

a person who had high fever with cold water and try 

to heal him by turning him around hot fire; they would 

not have eaten for three days, if they had been suffering 

from irregularities related to their blood flows, and they 

would use certain herbs to vomit in accordance with the 

letter that Amerigo Vespucci wrote to Pier Soderini on 

September 4, 1504 from Lisbon. Similarly, Claude Lévi-

Strauss (1961: 156) underlined that Indian doctors would 

use “round stool, a head-dress of straw, a gourd-rattle 

covered with a cotton net, and an ostrich-feather … to 

capture the tefos, or evil spirits, which were the cause of 

all illness” in the twentieth century, as he witnessed this.

Additionally,  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  discussed  the 

uses  of  some  fruits  for  taking  revenge  by  Brazilian 

Bororo populations, who would eat raw fruits as well 

as cooked fish; Vespucci’s Indians would eat raw herbs 

and cooked meat, as they would cook strange animals 

that were looking like snakes (Vespucci, 2013: 145): see 

also  the  story  narrated  by  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  (1964: 

102 - 103): 

“The  fishing  by  the  Bororo  is  a  competition  be-

tween men and women: as men could not catch any fish, 

women went fishing and got help from an otter; they 

were returning home with a lot of fish; men decided to 

take their revenge: they spied the women by the help of 

a bird, and they strangled all the otters; also the wom-

en took revenge by offering these men some hot drink 

made with piqui fruits.” 

As  in  Lévi-Strauss,  one  sees  binary  oppositions 

between  men  and  women  and  hot  and  cold  objects; 

animals are assistants to human beings, and fruits are 

nutrional  resources.  Some  hot  drink  serves  as  some 

dangerous  liquid  in  places  where  revenges  exist  be-

tween Indians. Therefore, the contrast between “being 

raw and cooked” is associated with the binary opposi-

tion between “nature and culture,” since civilized peo-

ple prefer cooked food to that raw one (Bullard, 1974: 

74).  The  South  Americans  were  aware  of  honey  and 

tobacco  before  the  Europeans  (Lévi-Strauss,  1966:  13). 

Animals  may  eat  raw  food,  whereas  humans  cooked 

food (Lévi-Strauss, 1966: 15). According to the Bororo 

myth, fruits appear as raw nutrional resources versus 

fish to be cooked before being eaten (Lévi-Struss, 1964: 

102  -  103).  Some  North  American  Indians  practiced 

“individual  totemism”  during  which  a  person  would 

try to make peace with the nature (Lévi-Strauss, 1991: 

17).  Indians  respected  the  nature  for  being  the  main 

resource for their survival; as did Vespucci (2013: 111) 

narrate to Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco dei Medici in 1502 

from  Lisbon,  underlining  that  Indians  did  not  have 

neither  laws  nor  regulations  for  living  “according  to 

the nature,” they would eat their meals, sitting on the 

land, these meals consisted of roots of herbs, fruits, sea 

products among which one could cite fish, sea urchins, 

crabs,  oysters,  shrimps,  et  cetera.  Lévi-Strauss  agreed 

with what Vespucci told by explaining that Indians had 

no laws as polygamy was acceptable among the Klam-

ath tribe whose members got married to those whom 

they had met during family visits in exchange of gifts 

(Lévi-Strauss, 1971): Klamath people were commercial 

warriors, and were exchanging slaves and products for 

horses, whereas Modocs had civil chiefs and war chiefs 

as their governors (Lévi-Strauss, 1971). However, Ves-

pucci (2013: 140) defended that Indians had not appre-

ciated any commercial goods, and they had not got any 

Derya 


Agiş - 

Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr


opoloğu


idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

www.idildergisi.com

141

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



governors, women were better at swimming than men 

as in Lévi-Strauss’s story on fishing, they were taking 

revenge of previous events in wars, they had no kings, 

when a person had killed another, the oldest person in 

the tribe delivered a revenge speech, inviting others to 

take the revenge of the murder; however, there were not 

any judges to punish culpable people among the Indi-

ans. Amerigo Vespucci depicted all of the above in a let-

ter he wrote to Pier Soderini on September 4, 1504 from 

Lisbon. 


Consequently,  both  Claude  Lévi-Strauss  and 

Amerigo Vespucci referred to binary oppositions, such 

as ‘male-female’ and ‘raw-cooked’ in their descriptions 

of the populations in South America regardless of the 

different centuries in which they lived.

4.  2.  Nakedness  and  Primitiveness:  Rich-Poor 

and Uneducated-Educated

Vespucci believed that the South American popu-

lations were primitive enough to be naked, by leading 

to  two  binary  oppositions:  ‘rich-poor’  and  ‘uneducat-

ed-educated.’ The Indians’ lands were rich, but they did 

not  have  any  technological  equipment  to  raise  crops, 

trade  gold,  or  establish  farms  where  they  could  raise 

cattles; thus, he wrote a letter to Pier Soderini from Lis-

bon on September 4, 1504 and titled it “The New World” 

by saying that the Indians were afraid of the Europe-

ans,  since  the  Europeans  had  clothes  (Vespucci,  2013: 

138).  These  Indians  appreciated  bells,  mirrors,  belts, 

and many other small objects that had no financial val-

ue according to the Europeans, trying to discover new 

trade routes; after having seen some Indian women and 

children, Vespucci and his peers got astonished on this 

same land of the Canary Islands (Vespucci, 2013: 139). 

Moreover, Vespucci (2013: 152) saw that many In-

dians had prepared many young men as meals by cas-

trating them, and on his way, he witnessed that there 

were “about 400 men and numerous women” and tried 

to pass them to his and his friends’ ship through a canoé, 

but these people escaped; this act was primitive for him. 

In fact, he was aiming at formulating a way of excuse for 

using and trading the natural resources of the popula-

tions of the lands he had discovered. 

Furthermore, after having left these cannibal pop-

ulations who would eat human meat, Amerigo Vespucci 

met friendly people, and thought that the people had 

exchanged onehundredfifty pearls for a small amount 

of gold, as commerce was a symbol of development and 

welfare for Vespucci, who also said, “additionally, we 

saw that they would drink wine made with fruits and 

seeds from which they make beer” (Vespucci, 2013: 153). 

Thus, Indians were rich, but in contrast to this richness, 

they were so naked to be regarded as shameless (Ves-

pucci, 2013: 139): here are the oppositions between the 

adjectives of rich and poor and uneducated and edu-

cated; as Europeans were educated, they covered their 

bodies with clothes and they had instructors who had 

taught them geography and commerce alongside good 

morals (Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 44 - 48). Italians had 

the ideology for going to the West, whereas the markets 

of the Iberia were famous: Spanish wool was purchased 

by Florentines (Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 44). Art trade 

was  common  in  Europe  (Fernández-Armesto,  2007: 

45).  Seville  was  full  of  artistic  opportunities  (Fernán-

dez-Armesto, 2007: 46). Olive oil, textiles, raw wool, wine, 

cereals, cattle, pork products, fish, ironworks, soap, and 

Canarian sugar were exported to other countries from 

Spain  (Fernández-Armesto,  2007:  47).  Seville  tried  to 

obtain fish from the Atlantic, took gold and slaves from 

Sub-Saharan regions, leather from Maghrib, and sugar 

from Sus (Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 48). Moreover, hu-

manists would study geography: Strabo’s Geography, a 

scientific heritage from the first century B.C. was stud-

ied (Fernández-Armesto, 2007: 22). Above all, Ptolemy’s 

Geography had been used in Greek and cosmography 

lessons since approximately 1397 (Fernández-Armesto, 

2007: 21). Meanwhile, Indians were much too primitive 

to be naked everywhere for Vespucci (2013: 139).

Additionally, Claude Lévi-Strauss showed that the 

tribe of Caduveo had women with painted faces (Lévi-

Strauss,  1961,  pictures  4  -  9),  and  a  girl  whose  whole 

body was also painted for a puberty rite (Lévi-Strauss, 

1961, picture 10). According to Lévi-Strauss (1961: 156), 

“elaborate  designs  were  painted  on  her  shoulders, 

arms, and face, and all the necklaces that they could lay 

hands on were heaped round her neck” for this puber-

ty celebration. He also took a picture of a naked Bororo 

couple (Lévi-Strauss, 1961, picture 12); he also alluded 

to the multiple wives of chiefs, such as Kunhatsin, the 

chief wife of Taperahi (Lévi-Strauss, 1961, picture 59). 

One conceives that Amerigo Vespucci (2013: 110 - 111) 

was right, since he defended that the Indians were na-

ked  and  polygamous  in  his  letter  to  Lorenzo  di  Pier-

francesco dei Medici from Lisbon in 1502 by saying that 

the Indians were “reasonable animals,” they saw that 

populations living in these South American lands were 

“completely naked” and had neither laws nor religious 

beliefs,  men  were  putting  bones  and  stones  as  orna-

ments  to  their  piercings  for  seeming  wilder,  and  men 

were getting married to many women.

Derya 


Agiş - 

Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr


opoloğu


www.idildergisi.com

idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

142

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



Consequently, both Europeans and Indians were 

rich: Europeans had the financial resources, whereas In-

dians had mines and natural nutritional resources; how-

ever, these rich Indians did not have any money; for this 

reason, they were poor enough not to be able to get ed-

ucation and training from instructors who might have 

taught them geography and commerce, whereas Euro-

peans were trained about both social sciences alongside 

good  morals.  The  Europeans  were  educated,  whereas 

the Indians were uneducated, as they had neither laws 

nor religious beliefs. Amerigo Vespucci referred to these 

binary oppositions of ‘rich-poor’ and ‘uneducated-edu-

cated,’ but Claude Lévi-Strauss admitted that Europe-

ans ruined the natural resources of these lands, impov-

erishing Indians by the uses of their technological tools 

that could be purchased by the rich and the educated so 

that nobody could be harmed, but the natural heritage 

of the Indians could be devastated, as in Brazil:  

“The road from Santos to São Paulo runs through 

one of the first territories to be exploited by the colonists. 

It has, therefore, the air of an archaeological site in which 

a vanished agriculture may be studied. Once-wooded 

hills offer their bone-structure for our inspection with, 

at most, a thin covering of sickly grass upon it. We can 

make out here and there earthworks which mark where 

a  coffee-plantation  once  stood;  they  jut  out  like  atro-

phied breasts through the grassy embankments. In the 

valleys the region has, as it were, gone back to Nature; 

but not to the noble architecture of the primeval forest. 

The capoeira, or secondary forest, is a mere wretched 

entanglement of half-hearted trees” (Lévi-Strauss, 1961: 

98).


Moreover,  Indians  still  believed  that  one  could 

become ill due to evil spirits without any scientific ev-

idence (Lévi-Strauss, 1961: 156). Besides, some women 

got  married  to  men  out  of  their  tribes,  but  some  had 

moral  confusions:  women  would  give  birth  to  chil-

dren, being confused about their physical roles, and the 

husbands who regarded their wives as food providers 

could easily get confused morally (Lévi-Strauss, 1968). 

Therefore,  Indians  were  regarded  as  poor  hu-

man  beings  for  not  knowing  anything  about  sciences 

and their moral duties as parents both by Vespucci in 

the early sixteenth century and Claude Lévi-Strauss in 

the  twentieth  century.  However,  Europeans  were  rich 

enough to have technological tools to gather informa-

tion  about  them  again  both  for  Vespucci,  who  got  on 

some developed ships to sail and discover the Indians, 

and  Lévi-Strauss,  who  could  photograph  the  Indians 

for documenting their external aspects. Europeans were 

educated enough to wear clothes, but Indians were un-

educated  enough  to  be  naked  everywhere  by  lacking 

several moral values that Europeans, who had laws and 

a religion, had.



4.  3.  War  Affairs:  Primitive-Developed,  Strong-

Weak, and Shameful-Shameless

Amerigo  Vespucci  criticized  the  populations  of 

the lands he discovered for being violent and primitive 

in his letter to Lorenzo di Piefrancesco dei Medici from 

Lisbon  in  1502,  mentioning  the  Italian  humanist  poet 

Petrarch  (Rerum  vulgarium  fragmenta,  XXVIII,  60  as 

cited by Perini in Vespucci, 2013: 112):

“Furthermore,  they  are  belligerent  people,  and 

they are cruel between themselves; besides, all of their 

arms and blows are against the wind, as does Petrarch 

say; they consist of bows, arrows, spears, and stones; on 

a side note, they do not carry any shields for protecting 

their bodies, because they walk around naked, as if they 

had come from their mothers’ wombs” (Vespucci, 2013: 

112, my translation).

In addition to that, Vespucci (2013: 112) wrote that 

these  populations  would  eat  their  enemies  and  fight 

cruelly. They would use the teeth of animals and wood 

pieces  in  place  of  metals  for  making  arms  (Vespucci, 

2013: 140): Vespucci wrote this in his letter to Pier Sod-

erini from Lisbon on September 4, 1504. 

Besides,  these  populations  would  never  punish 

criminals  or  naughty  children:  “They  do  not  employ 

justice, or they do not punish those who commit crimes: 

neither  the  father  nor  the  mother  punishes  their  off-

springs” (Vespucci, 2013: 140). Amerigo Vespucci (2013: 

149) indicated that the proportions of the bodies of In-

dians alluded to their peculiarities as warriors, and the 

signs painted on their faces and feathers referred to their 

strong wills to fight. As well, Claude Lévi-Strauss talk-

ed about similar facial paintings based on some cultur-

al experiences of Indians; plus, archeological evidence 

suggested  that  the  inhabitants  of  the Americas  had  a 

unique curvilinear style before the arrival of Columbus 

and Vespucci there:

“They  did  undoubtedly  appropriate  certain 

themes: we know of more than, one example of this. In 

1857, when a warship, tlie Mwrnanha, made its first ap-

pearance on the Paraguay a party of Indians paid her a 

visit; and on the following day they were seen to have 

drawn anchors all over their bodies … This only proves 

Derya 


Agiş - 

Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr


opoloğu


idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

www.idildergisi.com

143

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



that die Mbaya were already habitual and accomplished 

painters. Their curvilinear style has few counterparts in 

pre-Colombian America, but it offers analogies with ar-

chaeological documents which have been discovered in 

more than one part of the continent: and some of these 

pre-date  the  discovery  by  several  centuries”  (Lévi-

Strauss, 1961: 172).

The Indians might have assumed the Renaissance 

art they had learned from the Europeans (Lévi-Strauss, 

1961: 173). Additionally, the people of the Bororo tribe 

believed  that  their  existence  as  human  beings  were 

“transitory”  (Lévi-Strauss,  1961:  219).  However,  some 

Indians invented hammocks due to their poverty, but 

modern people use them in the gardens of luxury hotels 

today; moreover, nakedness was a symbol of a pure na-

ture for Lévi-Strauss (1961: 268): “The Indians of tropi-

cal America invented the hammock. Not to know of the 

hammock, and not to have any convenience of that kind 

for rest or sleep, is for them the very symbol of poverty. 

The Nambikwara sleep naked on the bare earth” (Lévi-

Strauss, 1961: 268)

Thus, regarding the binary oppositions of ‘prim-

itive-developed,’ ‘strong-weak,’ and ‘shameful-shame-

less,’ the Indians were primitive due to poverty linked 

to the lack of instruction and education, whereas Euro-

peans were well-developed; the Indians were stronger 

than the Europeans who were weaker in terms of their 

body  proportions  for  manual  hard  work;  the  Indians 

were  shameless  due  to  poverty  again,  as  they  lacked 

clothes; nor did they have the technological tools nec-

essary for making certain clothes, and Europeans who 

could  get  ashamed  for  being  naked  were  well-devel-

oped: they could stitch for being good at sewing and 

embroidery. For the advanced technological tools, they 

had, the Europeans could invade the lands of the Indi-

ans for using their natural resources, since this was also 

justified by Amerigo Vespucci, who criticized the can-

nibalism of Indians for justifying the conquest of their 

lands by the Europeans. 

5. Conclusion

To conclude, both Amerigo Vespucci and Claude 

Lévi-Strauss visited South America. They saw that In-

dians were living there. Amerigo Vespucci was aiming 

at discovering new trade routes and objects to trade: for 

this reason, he had to invent an excuse for exploiting 

the natural resources of the lands belonging to Indians, 

and consequently, he proposed that Indians were canni-

bals. Besides, he argued that Europeans were civilized, 

educated, and developed, whereas Indians were unciv-

ilized,  uneducated,  and  primitive:  they  did  not  know 

anything about navigation, geography, or quality meals 

that did not involve cooked human meat. 

Similarly, Claude Lévi-Strauss showed that Indi-

ans were almost as naked as those depicted by Vespucci 

to be shameless enough to walk around naked, they ate 

cooked fish and raw fruits, and were living in harmony 

with the nature without looking for international trade 

roots. Thus, both Vespucci and Lévi-Strauss posited that 

the Indians had healthy lives, herbal cures, and hot and 

cold meals, they were rich in natural resources, but poor 

in external financial gains, as they did not receive any 

commercial  training;  moreover,  according  to  Vespuc-

ci, the Indians were not monotheistic believers in God, 

and for this reason, they were uneducated, whereas the 

Europeans  were  educated enough  to  have  some mor-

als and manners. Regarding war affairs, for Vespucci, 

both Indian men and women were strong, women could 

swim better than men, but they had primitive arms in 

opposition  to  the  developed  ones  of  the  Europeans, 

strong Indians were athletic, whereas those weak ones 

were ill enough to wait for natural cures, and all the In-

dians were shameless enough to be naked most of the 

time, while the Europeans had covered themselves with 

fashionable clothes. Vespucci did not have any camer-

as, but Lévi-Strauss took the photos of the Indians, still 

living in South America in the twentieth century after 

the discovery of their ancestors by Vespucci in the ear-

ly sixteenth century. In this case, the binary oppositions 

existed between the Indians and the Europeans, whose 

life styles were distinct in terms of structural anthropol-

ogy from a Gestalt-like perspective, as both Indians and 

Europeans formed parts of the entire world for being 

human beings with different traditions, languages, and 

cultural  practices:  members  of  both  groups  of  people 

must  have  exchanged  some  knowledge  about  natural 

cures,  resources,  and  trade,  since  they  could  reach  an 

agreement and collaborate for being useful to the entire 

world without harming the nature. 

Human beings that become citizens of a country 

acquire the culture of that country in contrast to what 

the nature, i.e., their genetic qualities offer them: there 

were laws and regulations based on the European cul-

ture  in  the  sixteenth  and  twentieth  centuries,  but  the 

human nature had to encode the experience and testi-

monies related to these cultural elements so well that 

the human beings could learn to control their attitudes 

and behavior. Amerigo Vespucci should be regarded as 

a navigator, trying to find new natural items to trade 

in Europe, inventing the excuse that Indians were can-

Derya 

Agiş - 


Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 

Antr

opoloğu



www.idildergisi.com

idil, 2018, cilt / volume 7, sayı / issue 42

144

DOI: 10.7816 /idil-07-42-04



nibals in order to exploit the nature rather than to an-

alyze and understand the social structures of the Indi-

ans. However, Claude Lévi-Strauss is an anthropologist, 

trying to decipher the traditions of the Indians without 

accusing  them  for  being  polygamous,  cannibals,  and 

naked by considering their marriage rules, social orga-

nizations, and kinship systems (Lévi-Strauss, 1963: 76). 

Lévi-Strauss (1963: 370) suggested that social anthropol-

ogy should have been studied with “economic and so-

cial history, social psychology, and linguistics,” whereas 

“cultural  anthropology,  with  technology,  geography, 

and prehistory.” Therefore, the observations of Amerigo 

Vespucci and Claude Lévi-Strauss about South Ameri-

can Indians complete one another from a socio-cultural 

environmental anthropological point of view.

REFERENCES

AGİŞ,  Fazıla  Derya.  “Peace  Education,  Environ-

mentalism,  and  Amerigo  Vespucci”.  İdil  6.38  (2017): 

2673-2684

“Amerigo  Vespucci.”  Biography.com,  A&E  Tele-

vision Networks, LLC., 27 Apr. 2017, www.biography.

com/people/amerigo-vespucci-9517978.

BRIGGS,  Rachel,  and  Janelle  MEYER.  “Structur-

alism.” Anthropological Theories: A Guide Prepared by 

Students for Students, The University of Alabama, De-

partment of Anthropology, 2009. http://anthropology.

ua.edu/cultures/cultures.php?culture=structuralism. 

BULLARD, Eddie. “Review of: From Honey to As-

hes: Introduction to a Science of Mythology, Volume 2, 

by Claude Levi-Strauss.” Folklore Forum 7.1 (1974):73-

75.


FERNÁNDEZ-ARMESTO,  Felipe.  Amerigo:  The 

man who gave his name to America. New York: Ran-

dom House, 2007. 

LÉVI-STRAUSS,  Claude.  Tristes  Tropiques:  an 

anthropological  study  of  primitive  societies  in  Brazil. 

Translator:  John  Russell.  Criterion:  New  York,  1961. 

(Translation first published by: Hutchinson & Co. (Pub-

lishers) Ltd., London, 1961).

LÉVI-STRAUSS,  Claude,  Structural  Anthropol-

ogy. Translators Claire Jacobson, and Brooke G. Scho-

epf. New York: Basic Books, 1963. 

LÉVI-STRAUSS,  Claude.  Mythologiques.  Le  cru 

Derya 

AGİŞ - 


Amerigo V

espucci Claude Lévi - Strauss’a Karşı: Kim En İyi Deniz Dünyası 



Antr

opoloğu



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə