Laser spectroscopy studies on nobelium



Yüklə 108,94 Kb.

tarix02.03.2018
ölçüsü108,94 Kb.


Laser spectroscopy studies on nobelium

Michael Block

1

,

2



,

3

,



1

GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany

2

Helmholtz Institut Mainz, Staudingerweg 18, 55128 Mainz, Germany



3

Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany

Abstract. Laser spectroscopy of the heaviest elements provides high-precision data on their atomic and nuclear

properties. For example, atomic level energies and ionization potentials allow us to probe the influence of

relativistic effects on their atomic structure and to benchmark state-of-the-art atomic structure calculations.

In addition, it offers an alternative route to determine nuclear properties like spins, magnetic moments and

quadrupole moments in a nuclear model-independent way. Recently, a sensitive method based on resonant laser

ionization has been applied to nobelium isotopes around N = 152 at GSI Darmstadt. In pioneering experiments,

several atomic states have been identified extending the reach of laser spectroscopy beyond fermium. In this

contribution, the main achievements and future perspectives are briefly summarized.



1 Introduction

The atomic and chemical properties of the heaviest ele-

ments (Z

100) are affected by strong relativistic effects

and quantum electrodynamics [1–3]. Relativistic effects

increase approximately with the square of the atomic num-

ber and are responsible for the distinct color of gold and

for the liquid state of mercury at room temperature. For

example, these effects stabilize s and p

1/2


orbitals, whereas

p

3/2



and d orbitals are destabilized in energy. This leads to

changes of the atomic ground state configurations com-

pared to the trend observed in the elements we find in

nature. In lawrencium (Z = 103), for example, a 7p

1/2

ground state is predicted instead of a 6d state [4]. At



some point, a deviation from the regular pattern that gov-

erns the ordering of elements in the periodic table is ex-

pected. Such deviations were predicted for the superheavy

elements copernicium (Z = 112) and flerovium (Z = 114)

in the mid 1970s [5]. According to Pitzer these elements

should already show properties of noble gases even though

the next nobel gas in a regular periodic table would be

oganesson (Z = 118).

Experimentally, atomic and chemical properties of the

heaviest elements have been mainly studied by chem-

istry techniques either in gas phase or in liquid phase [6–

8]. Copernicium was actually found to be a rather regu-

lar member of group twelve [9], while the properties of

flerovium are still a matter of ongoing research [10, 11].

An alternative approach to study atomic properties

of heavy elements is through laser spectroscopy. Well-

established techniques provide high-precision data on

atomic properties such as atomic level energies, lifetimes

and ionization potentials that allow us to benchmark theo-

e-mail: m.block@gsi.de

retical predictions and to probe the influence of relativis-

tic effects. Also, nuclear properties are reflected in the

atomic spectrum. This enables studies of the evolution

of nuclear structure features in a complementary way to

traditional nuclear spectroscopy. For example, hyperfine

spectroscopy give access to the nuclear spin and to nuclear

moments. The shift of an atomic transition in different iso-

topes allows determining changes in mean square charge

radii of nuclei and hence, the nuclear size and deformation

in a nuclear model-independent way. However, accurate

calculations of the hyperfine parameters A and B or the

field shift factor F are required inputs from atomic theory.



2 Resonant ionization laser spectroscopy

of heavy nuclides

The method of choice for optical spectroscopy of rare

isotopes is resonant laser ionization spectroscopy (RIS).

This technique features high sensitivity, in particular if the

laser-created ions are detected by their characteristic ra-

dioactive decay. The method can even be applied to atoms

where no experimental information on atomic transitions

exists, which had been illustrated in fermium [12] and,

more recently, in astatine [13], for example.

For more than a decade, fermium (Z = 100) was

the heaviest element that had been studied by laser spec-

troscopy [12]. A tiny quantity of 46 pg of the long-lived

isotope

255


Fm (T

1/2


≈ 20 h) was prepared in the high-

flux reactor at Oak Ridge National laboratory. This en-

abled offline experiments in which several atomic transi-

tions were identified. Good agreement with predictions by

multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations [14]

was observed. In addition, broadband spectroscopy of the

complex hyperfine spectrum of

255


Fm with a nuclear spin

EPJ Web of Conferences 163, 00006 (2017) 

DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/201716300006

FUSION17

© The Authors, published by EDP Sciences. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 

 

License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).




of I = 7/2 was feasible and the hyperfine factors A and B

were obtained from a fit to the data [15].

The heavier members of the actinide series beyond fer-

mium have to be studied online. However, these elements

cannot be produced at isotope separator online (ISOL) fa-

cilities, but in fusion-evaporation reactions. This is exper-

imentally challenging due to low production rates on the

order of at most few particles per second. In addition, the

radionuclides have to be slowed down from tens of MeV to

rest and they have to be neutralized to perform RIS. This is

nowadays accomplished using gas cells filled with an inert

buffer gas like argon.



Si detector

Filament

Nobelium ions

Electrodes

Laser light

laser created ions

1

S

0

1

P

1

IP

l

1

l

2

Figure 1. Left: Schematic view of the buffer gas cell for laser

spectroscopy. Right: Simplified laser excitation scheme.

A dedicated RIS version, the so-called radia-

tion detected resonance ionization spectroscopy method

(RADRIS), has been developed for nobelium laser spec-

troscopy at GSI Darmstadt [16, 17]. The setup is schemat-

ically shown in 1. In the RADRIS method, nobelium ions

are separated from the primary beam by the separator for

heavy ion reaction products (SHIP [18, 19]) and slowed

down in 100 mbar ultra-pure argon gas. The fraction of

the stopped ions that remains in a charged state is accumu-

lated on a tantalum filament. Neutral nobelium atoms are

then evaporated by heating this filament. The atoms are

ionized in a two-step laser excitation scheme with pulsed

lasers. For the initial level search the first step is provided

by a tunable dye laser that is scanned across the spectral

region in which atomic states were predicted. The second

excitation step into the continuum is provided by a fixed-

frequency excimer laser (at 351 nm) featuring high power

to compensate the lower cross section of a non-resonant

excitation. The laser-created ions are detected by their

characteristic α decay registered by a silicon detector to

which the ions are transported by electric fields. Details on

the method and the employed setup have been described

elsewhere [20].



3 Scientific questions addressed by laser

spectroscopy

Detailed studies of the nuclear structure and its evolution

in regions of enhanced shell stabilization are of great im-

portance for a better understanding of the heaviest ele-

ments. Their very existence is intimately linked to nu-

clear shell effects. Ultimately, such investigations will

shed light on the nature of the underlying strong interac-

tion at one of the extremes of the nuclear chart. However,

the nuclides at the predicted spherical closed shells with

N = 184 and Z = 114, 120, or 126 [21] are experimen-

tally still inaccessible at present. The most neutron-rich

nuclide known to date contains only 177 neutrons [22]. In

addition, detailed studies of the elements with Z ≥ 110 are

hampered by limited statistics due to low cross sections on

a level of 1-10 picobarn.

Lighter nuclides in the region around Z = 100, N =

152 can be produced with higher rates that allow Penning

trap-mass spectrometry [23], laser spectroscopy [24] and

α

-γ spectroscopy [25]. Indeed, some of the single-particle



orbitals that are responsible for the spherical shell gap at

Z = 114 appear at low excitation energy in deformed nu-

clei around Z ≈ 100, N = 152. Thus, by fixing the position

of these orbitals at a given deformation allows discrimi-

nating models predicting the spherical gap. This region

also forms the backbone for spin assignments in heavier

nuclides in decay spectroscopy experiments based on sys-

tematics along isotones.

A complementary determination of nuclear spins by

laser spectroscopy is desirable. In addition, measure-

ments of dipole and quadrupole moments allow us to de-

termine single-particle configurations in specific nuclei.

This would, for example, provide an alternative to de-

termine the configuration of the long-lived K = 8

iso-


mer in

254


No for which different interpretations have been

put forward based on decay spectroscopy [26–30]. The

magnetic moment that could be measured by laser spec-

troscopy could answer the questions whether this isomer

is based on a quasi-neutron or quasi-proton configuration

that can both lead to K = 8

states at similar energy.



Nobelium atoms have a favorable atomic structure for

laser spectroscopy: the 5f shell is filled by 14 electrons

and the two valence electrons in the 7s orbital result in

a ground-state configuration [Rn] 5f

14

7s

2 1



S

0

. This fa-



cilitates accurate calculations of atomic properties. Mod-

ern calculations of the electronic structure in the heavi-

est elements require the explicit treatment of relativistic

and quantum electrodynamics effects. In addition, electron

correlations have to considered. This is accomplished em-

ploying many-body approaches like multi-configuration

Dirac-Fock or relativistic coupled cluster methods [1–

3, 14]. They can reach high accuracy with a typical pre-

cision of meV for level energies. The accuracy of such

calculations is often estimated by a comparison of cal-

culated properties to experimental data in the lanthanide

region since the available data for the heaviest elements

are limited. According to theoretical predictions nobelium

features a strong ground-state transition

1

S

0



-

1

P



1

around


30,000 cm

−1

[14, 31, 32].



4 Status and future perspectives

A practical advantage for studies of nobelium isotopes

around N = 152 is their rather high yield:

254


No can be

produced in the reaction

208

Pb(


48

Ca,2n) with a cross sec-

tion of about 2 µb corresponding to a yield of few particles

per second at an accelerator facility like GSI Darmstadt.

EPJ Web of Conferences 163, 00006 (2017) 

DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/201716300006



FUSION17

2



of I = 7/2 was feasible and the hyperfine factors A and B

were obtained from a fit to the data [15].

The heavier members of the actinide series beyond fer-

mium have to be studied online. However, these elements

cannot be produced at isotope separator online (ISOL) fa-

cilities, but in fusion-evaporation reactions. This is exper-

imentally challenging due to low production rates on the

order of at most few particles per second. In addition, the

radionuclides have to be slowed down from tens of MeV to

rest and they have to be neutralized to perform RIS. This is

nowadays accomplished using gas cells filled with an inert

buffer gas like argon.



Si detector

Filament

Nobelium ions

Electrodes

Laser light

laser created ions

1

S

0

1

P

1

IP

l

1

l

2

Figure 1. Left: Schematic view of the buffer gas cell for laser

spectroscopy. Right: Simplified laser excitation scheme.

A dedicated RIS version, the so-called radia-

tion detected resonance ionization spectroscopy method

(RADRIS), has been developed for nobelium laser spec-

troscopy at GSI Darmstadt [16, 17]. The setup is schemat-

ically shown in 1. In the RADRIS method, nobelium ions

are separated from the primary beam by the separator for

heavy ion reaction products (SHIP [18, 19]) and slowed

down in 100 mbar ultra-pure argon gas. The fraction of

the stopped ions that remains in a charged state is accumu-

lated on a tantalum filament. Neutral nobelium atoms are

then evaporated by heating this filament. The atoms are

ionized in a two-step laser excitation scheme with pulsed

lasers. For the initial level search the first step is provided

by a tunable dye laser that is scanned across the spectral

region in which atomic states were predicted. The second

excitation step into the continuum is provided by a fixed-

frequency excimer laser (at 351 nm) featuring high power

to compensate the lower cross section of a non-resonant

excitation. The laser-created ions are detected by their

characteristic α decay registered by a silicon detector to

which the ions are transported by electric fields. Details on

the method and the employed setup have been described

elsewhere [20].



3 Scientific questions addressed by laser

spectroscopy

Detailed studies of the nuclear structure and its evolution

in regions of enhanced shell stabilization are of great im-

portance for a better understanding of the heaviest ele-

ments. Their very existence is intimately linked to nu-

clear shell effects. Ultimately, such investigations will

shed light on the nature of the underlying strong interac-

tion at one of the extremes of the nuclear chart. However,

the nuclides at the predicted spherical closed shells with

N = 184 and Z = 114, 120, or 126 [21] are experimen-

tally still inaccessible at present. The most neutron-rich

nuclide known to date contains only 177 neutrons [22]. In

addition, detailed studies of the elements with Z ≥ 110 are

hampered by limited statistics due to low cross sections on

a level of 1-10 picobarn.

Lighter nuclides in the region around Z = 100, N =

152 can be produced with higher rates that allow Penning

trap-mass spectrometry [23], laser spectroscopy [24] and

α

-γ spectroscopy [25]. Indeed, some of the single-particle



orbitals that are responsible for the spherical shell gap at

Z = 114 appear at low excitation energy in deformed nu-

clei around Z ≈ 100, N = 152. Thus, by fixing the position

of these orbitals at a given deformation allows discrimi-

nating models predicting the spherical gap. This region

also forms the backbone for spin assignments in heavier

nuclides in decay spectroscopy experiments based on sys-

tematics along isotones.

A complementary determination of nuclear spins by

laser spectroscopy is desirable. In addition, measure-

ments of dipole and quadrupole moments allow us to de-

termine single-particle configurations in specific nuclei.

This would, for example, provide an alternative to de-

termine the configuration of the long-lived K = 8

iso-


mer in

254


No for which different interpretations have been

put forward based on decay spectroscopy [26–30]. The

magnetic moment that could be measured by laser spec-

troscopy could answer the questions whether this isomer

is based on a quasi-neutron or quasi-proton configuration

that can both lead to K = 8

states at similar energy.



Nobelium atoms have a favorable atomic structure for

laser spectroscopy: the 5f shell is filled by 14 electrons

and the two valence electrons in the 7s orbital result in

a ground-state configuration [Rn] 5f

14

7s

2 1



S

0

. This fa-



cilitates accurate calculations of atomic properties. Mod-

ern calculations of the electronic structure in the heavi-

est elements require the explicit treatment of relativistic

and quantum electrodynamics effects. In addition, electron

correlations have to considered. This is accomplished em-

ploying many-body approaches like multi-configuration

Dirac-Fock or relativistic coupled cluster methods [1–

3, 14]. They can reach high accuracy with a typical pre-

cision of meV for level energies. The accuracy of such

calculations is often estimated by a comparison of cal-

culated properties to experimental data in the lanthanide

region since the available data for the heaviest elements

are limited. According to theoretical predictions nobelium

features a strong ground-state transition

1

S

0



-

1

P



1

around


30,000 cm

−1

[14, 31, 32].



4 Status and future perspectives

A practical advantage for studies of nobelium isotopes

around N = 152 is their rather high yield:

254


No can be

produced in the reaction

208

Pb(


48

Ca,2n) with a cross sec-

tion of about 2 µb corresponding to a yield of few particles

per second at an accelerator facility like GSI Darmstadt.

Applying the RADRIS method to the nobelium iso-

tope


254

No, the strong ground state transition

1

S

0



-

1

P



1

has


been searched for in a tedious effort [16, 17]. Such ex-

periments depend crucially on the guidance by theoretical

predictions. Different atomic transitions in the nobelium

atom have been predicted prior to the GSI experiment

[14, 31, 32]. The typical uncertainties and the scattering

of the predictions resulted in scan range on the order of

≥ 2, 000 cm

−1

that had to be covered. For a typical line



width of in-gas cell spectroscopy of about 0.5 cm

−1

[16]



this corresponds to a few thousand frequency steps for the

initial search. In the case of

254

No the cycle time for one



such step sums up to about five minutes equivalent to a

minimum search time of more than 200 hours to cover the

range of the predicted atomic transitions.

Nonetheless, the

1

S

0



-

1

P



1

transition as well as several

Rydberg states in the nobelium isotope

254


No have been

identified for the first time recently [33]. An overall ef-

ficiency about six percent was achieved using a two-step

laser excitation that could be boosted for a limited time by

conditioning the filament. Based on the observed Rydberg

series in

254

No the first ionization potential could already



be derived with rather high precision. However, quenching

collisions led to the population of a metastable state, most

likely the

3

D



1

state that is close to the

1

P

1



state that was ex-

cited by the first laser pulse. This behavior was explained

by a rate equation model that describes the experimental

data well and allows determining the energy of the

3

D

1



state indirectly [33, 34]. However, Rydberg states could

be excited by the second laser from either of the two states

resulting in different series. In 2016, different Rydberg

series were unambiguously identified, including a series

originating form the

1

P



1

state from which the first ioniza-

tion potential of nobelium could be determined with high

precision. The data analysis is close to completion and

the results will be published shortly. All in all, the results

for atomic properties of nobelium showed good agreement

with theoretical predictions [14, 31, 32].

The measurements were extended to the nobelium iso-

topes

252,253


No. The lowest yield was available for

252


No

with a cross section of about 400 nanobarn in the reac-

tion

208


Pb(

48

Ca,2n)



252

No. Decay losses on the filament

reduced efficiency to about three precent for this shorter-

lived nobelium isotope [33]. The isotope shift of the

1

S

0



-

1

P



1

transition between

252,253,254

No was measured and the

hyperfine splitting in

253


No was observed. The data analy-

sis is ongoing and the results will be subject of forthcom-

ing publications. The experiments will provide the change

of the nuclear charge radius between the isotopes

252,254

No

as well as the magnetic moment and the ground-state spin



assignment in

253


No.

Resonant laser ionization spectroscopy in a gas cell is

a powerful method to identify atomic transitions in rare

isotopes where little is known experimentally. However,

the line width that can be achieved with in-gas cell spec-

troscopy is limited by pressure and Doppler broadening

to typically about 5 GHz. In some cases higher resolution

spectroscopy is required, for example to resolve individual

hyperfine components for the determination of the mag-

netic moment. A higher resolution was recently demon-

strated with a new technique, the so-called gas-jet laser

spectroscopy [35]. The method was recently developed at

KU Leuven and was applied to actinium isotopes where a

gain in resolution by almost one order of magnitude com-

pared to in-gas cell spectroscopy without sacrificing the

high efficiency.

Future efforts will be dedicated to extend the reach of

laser spectroscopy even further towards heavier elements.

For a first foray into an unexplored area, a broadband level

search with high-power lasers in a gas cell, for example

with the RADRIS technique, will be favorable. Once suit-

able transitions have been identified, high-resolution spec-

troscopy can be performed by in-gas jet spectroscopy. In

any case the steeply dropping cross section for the produc-

tion of heavier elements are challenging. In this respect,

laser spectroscopy will profit from new powerful stable-

beam accelerators. Such machines that are anticipated to

deliver 10–100 times higher primary beam intensities are

presently planned or under construction in several facili-

ties worldwide [36–38].

For the first exploration of the element lawrencium,

the RADRIS method can be adapted in a straightforward

manner. A key question in Lr that can be answered by

laser spectroscopy concerns the atomic ground-state con-

figuration as discussed above. Theoretical models predict

a 7p


1/2

ground state, but the 6d state is rather close in en-

ergy [4]. Recent experiments performed in Tokai, Japan

used a surface ionization technique to determine the first

ionization potential of Lr [39]. Their result agrees with the

theoretical prediction well and confirms that Lr terminates

the actinide series. However, the uncertainty of the em-

ployed method does not allow distinguishing between the

two different ground state configurations unambiguously.

Thus, an experimental verification by laser spectroscopy is

still of interest.

Acknowledgements

The experiments on nobelium discussed in this contribu-

tion were performed by the RADRIS collaboration com-

prising scientists from GSI Darmstadt, Helmholtz Institute

Mainz, Mainz University, Technical University Darmstadt,

KU Leuven, University of Liverpool, and TRIUMF Van-

couver. Their contributions are gratefully acknowledged.

References

[1] P. Schwerdtfeger, L.F. Pašteka, A. Punnett, P.O.

Bowman, Nuclear Physics A

944, 551 (2015)

[2] E. Eliav, S. Fritzsche, U. Kaldor, Nucl. Phys.

A944,


518 (2015)

[3] V. Pershina, Nuclear Physics A

944, 578 (2015)

[4] A. Borschevsky, E. Eliav, M. Vilkas, Y. Ishikawa,

U. Kaldor, Eur. Phys. J. D

45, 115 (2007)

[5] K.S. Pitzer, The Journal of Chemical Physics

63,


1032 (1975)

[6] M. Schädel, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A

373, 20140191

(2015)


EPJ Web of Conferences 163, 00006 (2017) 

DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/201716300006



FUSION17

3



[7] A. Türler, R. Eichler, A. Yakushev, Nuclear Physics

A

944, 640 (2015)



[8] Y. Nagame, J.V. Kratz, M. Schädel, Nucl. Phys.

A944, 614 (2015)

[9] R. Eichler, N. Aksenov, A. Belozerov, G. Bozhikov,

V. Chepigin, S. Dmitriev, R. Dressler, H. Gäggeler,

V. Gorshkov, F. Haenssler et al., Nature

447, 72


(2007)

[10] R. Eichler, N. Aksenov, Y.V. Albin, A. Belozerov,

G. Bozhikov, V. Chepigin, S. Dmitriev, R. Dressler,

H. Gäggeler, V. Gorshkov et al., Radiochimica Acta

International journal for chemical aspects of nuclear

science and technology

98, 133 (2010)

[11] A. Yakushev, J.M. Gates, A. Türler, M. Schädel,

C.E. Düllmann, D. Ackermann, L.L. Andersson,

M. Block, W. Brüchle, J. Dvorak et al., Inorganic

chemistryü

53, 1624 (2014)

[12] M. Sewtz, H. Backe, A. Dretzke, G. Kube, W. Lauth,

P. Schwamb, K. Eberhardt, C. Grüning, P. Thörle,

N. Trautmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett

90, 163002

(2003)

[13] S. Rothe, V.N. Fedosseev, T. Kron, B.A. Marsh, R.E.



Rossel, K.D.A. Wendt, Nucl. Instrum. Meth.

B317,


561 (2013)

[14] S. Fritzsche, C. Dong, F. Koike, A. Uvarov, Eur.

Phys. J. D

45, 107 (2007)

[15] H. Backe, A. Dretzke, R. Haire, P. Kunz, W. Lauth,

M. Sewtz, N. Trautmann et al., Hyperfine interac-

tions

162, 3 (2005)



[16] H. Backe, P. Kunz, W. Lauth, A. Dretzke, R. Horn,

T. Kolb, M. Laatiaoui, M. Sewtz, D. Ackermann,

M. Block et al., Eur. Phys. J. D

45, 99 (2007)

[17] M. Laatiaoui, H. Backe, M. Block, P. Chhetri,

F. Lautenschläger, W. Lauth, T. Walther, Hyperfine

Interact.

227, 69 (2014)

[18] G. Münzenberg, W. Faust, S. Hofmann, P. Arm-

bruster, K. Güttner, H. Ewald, Nucl. Instrum. and

Meth.

161, 65 (1979)



[19] S. Hofmann, G. Münzenberg, Reviews of Modern

Physics


72, 733 (2000)

[20] F. Lautenschläger, P. Chhetri, D. Ackermann,

H. Backe, M. Block, B. Cheal, A. Clark, C. Droese,

R. Ferrer, F. Giacoppo et al., Nuclear Instruments and

Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Inter-

actions with Materials and Atoms

383, 115 (2016)

[21] A. Sobiczewski, K. Pomorski, Progress in Particle

and Nuclear Physics

58, 292 (2007)

[22] Yu.T. Oganessian, V.K. Utyonkov, Nucl. Phys.

A944,


62 (2015)

[23] M. Block, Nuclear Physics A

944, 471 (2015)

[24] H. Backe, W. Lauth, M. Block, M. Laatiaoui, Nu-

clear Physics A

944, 492 (2015)

[25] M. Asai, F.P. Heßberger, A. Lopez-Martens, Nucl.

Phys.


A944, 308 (2015)

[26] R.D. Herzberg, P. Greenlees, P. Butler, G. Jones,

M. Venhart, I. Darby, S. Eeckhaudt, K. Eskola,

T. Grahn, C. Gray-Jones et al., Nature

442, 896

(2006)


[27] S. Tandel, T. Khoo, D. Seweryniak, G. Mukher-

jee, I. Ahmad, B. Back, R. Blinstrup, M. Carpenter,

J. Chapman, P. Chowdhury et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.

97,


082502 (2006)

[28] H. Jeppesen, R. Clark, K. Gregorich, A. Afanas-

jev, M. Ali, J. Allmond, C. Beausang, M. Cromaz,

M. Deleplanque, I. Dragojevi´c et al., Physical Re-

view C

80, 034324 (2009)



[29] R. Clark, K. Gregorich, J. Berryman, M. Ali, J. All-

mond, C. Beausang, M. Cromaz, M. Deleplanque,

I. Dragojevi´c, J. Dvorak et al., Physics Letters B

690,


19 (2010)

[30] F. Heßberger, S. Antalic, B. Sulignano, D. Acker-

mann, S. Heinz, S. Hofmann, B. Kindler, J. Khuyag-

baatar, I. Kojouharov, P. Kuusiniemi et al., Eur. Phys.

J. A

43, 55 (2010)



[31] A. Borschevsky, E. Eliav, M.J. Vilkas, Y. Ishikawa,

U. Kaldor, Phys. Rev. A

75, 042514 (2007)

[32] V.A. Dzuba, M.S. Safronova, U.I. Safronova, Phys.

Rev.

A90, 012504 (2014)



[33] M. Laatiaoui et al., Nature

538, 495 (2016)

[34] P. Chhetri et al., Eur. Phys. J. D (2017 (under review))

[35] R. Ferrer, A. Barzakh, B. Bastin, R. Beerwerth,

M. Block, P. Creemers, H. Grawe, R. de Groote,

P. Delahaye, X. Fléchard et al., Nature Communi-

cations

8, 14520 (2017)



[36] S. Dmitriev, M. Itkis, Y. Oganessian, Status and per-

spectives of the Dubna superheavy element factory,

in EPJ Web of Conferences (EDP Sciences, 2016),

Vol. 131, p. 08001

[37] F. Déchery, A. Drouart, H. Savajols, J. Nolen, M. Au-

thier, A. Amthor, D. Boutin, O. Delferriére, B. Gall,

A. Hue et al., The European Physical Journal A

51,


66 (2015)

[38] W. Barth, K. Aulenbacher, M. Basten, F. Dzi-

uba, V. Gettmann, M. Miski-Oglu, H. Podlech,

S. Yaramyshev, A superconducting CW-LINAC for

heavy ion acceleration at GSI, in EPJ Web of Con-

ferences (EDP Sciences, 2017), Vol. 138, p. 01026

[39] T. Sato, M. Asai, A. Borschevsky, T. Stora, N. Sato,

Y. Kaneya, K. Tsukada, C.E. Düllmann, K. Eber-

hardt, E. Eliav et al., Nature

520, 209 (2015)

EPJ Web of Conferences 163, 00006 (2017) 

DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/201716300006



FUSION17

4

: articles -> epjconf -> pdf
articles -> Çili şairinin bu odası bizim gündəlik həyatımizda qara ciyərin nə qədər önəmli olması gözəl nümayiş olunmuşdur
articles -> Baş beyinin şişlərin nəticəsində əmələ gələn psixiki pozuntular
articles -> Döş qəfəsində ağrı, əsas şikayət kimi ambulator müraciətlərin demək olar ki, 1-2%-də təsadüf olunur
articles -> Baş beyinin atrofiyası nəticəsində əmələ gələn psixiki pozuntular baş beyinin hüceyrə elementlərin proqresivləşən disfunksiya və deqenerasiyası nəticəsində inkişaf edən (edə bilən)
articles -> Baş beyinin damar xəstəlikləri nəticəsində əmələ gələn psixiki pozuntular
articles -> Yazı xəttinin pozulması Əllərin "Əlçalma" şəkilli tremoru Barmaq-burun sınağı zamanı yayınma
articles -> Affektiv pozuntular ilk növbədə əhval ruhiyənin pozulması ilə özlərini biruzə verir
articles -> Affektiv psixozlar
pdf -> Honoring Epimenides of Crete \(±Δx\): From Quantum Paradoxes, through Weak Measurements, to the Nature of Time


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə