Paranormal belief and religiosity



Yüklə 129,41 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix13.11.2017
ölçüsü129,41 Kb.
#10226


PARANORMAL BELIEF AND RELIGIOSITY 

By Andreas Hergovich, Reinhard Schott, and Martin Arendasy



ABSTRACT: The findings of past research on the relationship between paranormal 

belief  and  religiosity  are  inconclusive.  The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  examine  the 

relationship  based  on  a  sample  from  Austria  and  also  with  respect  to  different 

aspects of paranormal belief as well as religious belief. A sample of 596 students 

completed a measure of paranormal belief and a questionnaire on various indices 

of religiosity. The results revealed rather low but significant correlations between 

paranormal belief and religiosity. Intrinsic religiosity and self-reported religiosity 

were much more strongly related to paranormal belief than was extrinsic religiosity. 

For  subjects  without  religious  affiliation,  the  relationship  between  religiosity  and 

paranormal  belief  was  higher  than  for  Catholics  and  Protestants.  These  results 

suggest a modified version of the substitution hypothesis indicating that paranormal 

belief can be, but must not necessarily be, a substitute for traditional religion. 

A  number  of  studies  have  examined  the  relationship  between 

paranormal  belief  and  religiosity.  In  accordance  with  the  hypothesis 

that paranormal belief functions as a substitute for religious belief, some 

authors have reported a negative relationship between paranormal belief 

and  measures  of  religious  belief  (Emmons  &  Sobal,  1981;  Persinger  & 

Makarec, 1990; Beck & Miller, 2001). However, this negative relationship 

could also be interpreted as a manifestation of rejection of at least some 

paranormal  beliefs  (precognition  and  superstition)  by  the  Catholic 

Church (Goode, 2000; Sparks, 2001). In contrast to the substitution theory, 

there exists the hypothesis that people who believe in angels or wondrous 

healings also believe in other paranormal phenomena such as ghosts and 

voodoo (Irwin, 1993; Rice, 2003). Thus, the paranormal is undoubtedly 

a common characteristic of both religion and parapsychology, although 

in  our  times  the  paranormal  is  probably  losing  its  importance  in  most 

religions. Related to the fact that the paranormal is common to religion 

and parapsychology is the theory of a common worldview (Zusne & Jones, 

1989). Religiosity and paranormal belief imply a belief in the existence 

of  phenomena  that  currently  cannot  be  explained  by  science,  be  it 

phenomena such as psi (extrasensory perception and psychokinesis) or 

the belief in life after death or God. The acceptance of these phenomena 

allows the believer to have a different worldview, one that shows the world 

as being more humane and having greater meaning. Such an animistic 

world  does  not  obey  mechanical  scientific  laws  and  is  not  reducible  to 

materialism.  In  line  with  this  reasoning,  some  studies  indicate  a  rather 

small (around = .20) but positive relationship between both constructs 

(Haraldsson, 1981; Irwin, 1985; Goode, 2000). Thalbourne (2003) even 



294

The Journal of Parapsychology

describes  the  substitution  theory  as  an  “urban  myth”  because  in  seven 

out  of  nine  studies  he  found  positive  correlations  between  paranormal 

belief and religiosity (the coefficients were between = .20 and = .55). 

For  a  German  sample,  Thalbourne  and  Houtkooper  (2002)  reported 

a  correlation  of  r  =  .54  between  the  Australian  Sheep-Goat  Scale  and 

religiosity. 

Orenstein  (2002)  concluded  that  past  studies  could  not  clearly 

show whether religious belief is related positively, negatively, or not at all to 

paranormal belief. 

A  study  by  Thalbourne  and  O’Brien  (1999)  on  Australian 

participants  shows  that  the  direction  of  the  relationship  may  depend 

on  the  measurements  selected.  They  obtained  an  almost  significant 

negative correlation (= -.17) between the Australian Sheep-Goat Scale 

(Thalbourne & Delin, 1993) and the Religion-Puritanism Scale from the 

Wilson-Patterson  Attitude  Scale  (Wilson,  1975),  a  correlation  close  to 

zero with the subscale traditional religiosity (= .07) from the Paranormal 

Belief  Scale  (PBS,  Tobacyk  &  Milford,  1983),  and  a  significant  and 

positive coefficient with the religiosity scale of Haraldsson (derived from 

Haraldsson, 1981). 

Another  reason  why  the  previous  results  for  the  relationship 

between religious belief and paranormal belief are difficult to compare 

or  generalise  is  the  heterogeneity  of  the  samples  that  were  examined. 

The  samples  differ  not  only  with  respect  to  ethnicity  or  nationality  but 

also,  most  importantly  for  this  question,  with  respect  to  their  religious 

affiliation. For example, in the study by Thalbourne and O’Brien (1999), 

the sample consisted mainly of Protestants; in a study by Thalbourne and 

Hensley (2001), which reported a correlation of .30 between a religiosity 

scale and the Icelandic Sheep-Goat Scale (Haraldsson, 1981), nearly one 

third of the subjects from Washington University in St. Louis were Jewish, 

Protestant,  and  Catholic,  respectively.  Other  studies  do  not  include 

information concerning the religious affiliation of their sample, although 

in  some  instances  it  can  be  guessed  (e.g.,  Beck  and  Miller,  2001,  who 

found a negative relationship between paranormal belief and religiosity, 

hinted  that  they  recruited  their  subjects  from  a  “Christian  affiliated 

institution”). Thalbourne and O’Brien (1999) analysed the influence of 

current  religious  affiliations  and  showed  that,  aside  from  Spiritualists, 

participants  without  religious  affiliation  had  the  highest  belief  in  the 

paranormal. 

One  aim  of  the  current  study  was  to  assess  the  relationship 

between religiosity and paranormal belief in a larger sample from Austria, 

controlling for religious affiliation. The larger sample was used to ensure 

that  the  different  religious  affiliations  were  represented,  although  it  is 

clear  that  in  Austria,  with  its  largely  Catholic  society,  we  would  not  get 

an  equal  number  of  participants  with  a  random  sample.  The  other 

purpose  was  to  include  not  only  different  aspects  of  paranormal  belief 




295

Paranormal Belief and Religiosity

but also different aspects of religious belief, such as intrinsic religiosity 

and extrinsic religiosity, as was suggested by Sparks (2001). We had not 

derived specific hypotheses for all variables investigated, but generally we 

assumed that for participants without religious affiliation the relationship 

between intrinsic religiosity and quest on the one hand and paranormal 

belief  on  the  other  hand  would  be  higher  than  for  participants  with 

religious affiliation. 

Method

Participants

A total of 596 participants were selected for this study. They were 

422 (70.8%) female and 174 (29.2%) male students from two universities 

in Vienna: the Technical University (= 126) and the main University of 

Vienna (= 470, of whom the majority, 64.8%, were psychology students). 

The mean age of the total sample was 22.29, ranging from 18 to 65 (with 

a  standard  deviation  of  6.12).  With  respect  to  religious  affiliation,  421 

participants  (70.6%)  were  Catholic;  92  (15.4%)  were  without  religious 

affiliation; 53 (8.9%) were Protestant; 20 (3.3%) were unspecified, other, 

or single denominations (Taoist, Buddhist, Adventist, etc.); and 10 (1.7%) 

Moslem. 

Procedure

All  participants  completed  a  questionnaire  containing  the  PBS 

(Tobacyk  &  Milford,  1983),  the  Intrinsic/Extrinsic  Religiosity  Scale  of 

Gorsuch  and  McPherson  (1989)  and  the  scale  “quest”  by  Batson  and 

Schoenrade  (1991)  in  German  translation  (Küpper  &  Bierhoff,  1999). 

The  PBS  assesses  paranormal  belief  across  a  wide  domain,  including 

the subscales traditional religious belief (e.g., “There is a devil”; “There 

is  heaven  and  hell”),  psi  (e.g.,  “A  person’s  thoughts  can  influence  the 

movement  of  a  physical  object”),  witchcraft  (e.g.,  “Black  magic  really 

exists”; “There are actual cases of death from Voodoo”), superstition (e.g., 

“Black cats can bring bad luck”; “If you break a mirror, you will have bad 

luck”), spiritualism (e.g., “It is possible to communicate with the dead”; 

“Reincarnation  does  occur”),  extraordinary  life  forms  (e.g.,  “The  Loch 

Ness  monster  of  Scotland  exists”;  “Big  Foot  exists”),  and  precognition 

(e.g.,  “Some  people  have  the  ability  to  predict  the  future”).  The  scale 

consists of 25 items that are assessed on a 5-point scale. The scale intrinsic 

religiosity is supposed to measure religiosity from inner conviction with 

8  items  on  a  9-point  Likert  scale  (sample  item:  “It  is  important  for  me 

to  devote  time  to  personal  thoughts  and  prayers”).  Extrinsic  religiosity 

has  an  instrumental  function  as  a  source  of  well-being  and  consolation 

and is measured with 6 items on a 9-point Likert scale (sample item: “I 



296

The Journal of Parapsychology

go to church mainly to meet people I like”). Quest measures the degree 

to which participants pose to themselves existential questions. The quest 

scale consists of 12 items that are assessed on a 9-point Likert-scale (sample 

item: “I persistently scrutinize my own religious convictions”). 

Moreover,  the  sample  was  asked  to  specify  socio-demographic 

variables  (age,  sex)  and  attendance  at  church/religious  gatherings.  The 

questionnaire also contained two single questions on 5-point Likert Scales 

with  regard  to  religious  belief  and  paranormal  belief  (“How  religious 

would you describe yourself as being?” and “Do you believe in paranormal 

phenomena?”). 

Results


First,  descriptive  statistics  and  reliabilities  of  the  scales  were 

calculated. The mean of the PBS was 71.01 (SD = 19.17) with a range from 

25 to 121. The internal consistency (Cronbach’s Alpha) of the PBS was .91 

for the whole sample. For the quest scale the mean was 59.47 (SD = 17.33) 

with  a  range  from  20  to  101.  The  internal  consistency  for  quest  was  .83. 

Intrinsic religiosity had a mean of 30.93 (SD = 13.21) with a range from 8 to 

70. Cronbach’s Alpha was .81. For extrinsic religiosity the mean of the scale 

was 17.15 (SD = 7.93), ranging from 6 to 43. The internal consistency was 

.70. The correlations between the scales of religiosity (intrinsic religiosity, 

extrinsic religiosity, quest, and traditional religiosity of the PBS) were not 

significant  except  for  the  correlations  between  intrinsic  and  extrinsic 

religiosity,  r  (594)  =  .52,  p  <  .01,  and  between  traditional  religiosity  and 

quest, (594) = .23, < .01. For all variables, the assumption of normality 

was  satisfied,  because  the  skewness  of  all  variables  was  under  2  and  the 

kurtosis under 7 (Curran, West, & Finch, 1996). 

A  multivariate  analysis  of  variance  (MANOVA),  with  religious 

affiliation (which contained only groups with a sufficient number of people 

in  our  sample,  i.e.,  Protestants,  participants  without  religious  affiliation, 

and Catholics) as the independent variable, and the subscales of the PBS 

(without traditional religious belief) as dependent variables, was calculated. 

Although BOX M’s Test of multivariate normality was significant and the 

number  of  participants  in  the  groups  was  highly  unequal,  Mardia’s  test 

(DeCarlo, 1997) was not significant, suggesting that the violations are not 

extreme. As a precaution, following the argumentation of Stevens (1996), we 

selected the interpretation of the Pillai-Bartlett trace because of its greater 

robustness against violations of the assumptions of multivariate normality 

(Stevens,  1996).  The  results  of  the  MANOVA  revealed  no  significant 

differences between the different religious affiliations, (12, 1112) = 1.21, 



> .05.

Next,  correlations  between  measures  of  religious  belief  and 

paranormal belief were computed for the total sample (Table 1). 



297

Paranormal Belief and Religiosity

As can be seen, paranormal belief has substantial correlations with 

self-reported religiosity (single question: “How religious would you describe 

yourself as being?”). The correlation with the total score of the PBS (without 

traditional religious belief) amounted to r (594) = .20, < .001, and the 

correlation with self-reported paranormal belief was (594) = .22, < .001. 

For the PBS, the highest coefficients were found with the subscales psi and 

spiritualism. Even higher correlations were recorded between traditional 

religious belief (as part of the PBS) and the other PBS subscales. 

T

able



 2

M

ulTiple



 C

orrelaTions

 b

eTween


 r

eligiosiTy

 i

ndiCes


 

and


 p

aranorMal

 b

elief


 

for


 

The


 V

arious


 r

eligious


 a

ffiliaTions

 (N = 566)

Quest Intrinsic Extrinsic Religiosity Church Tradit

Protestants

.24


.30

.40


.27

.28


.57*

Without


.38

.43*


.16

.41*


.15

.60***


Catholics

.14


.19*

.12


.26***

.11


.46***

 

*p < .05,**p < .01,***p < .001



Note. The multiple correlations result from regression analyses with each 

index  of  religiosity  as  criterion  and  all  subscales  of  paranormal  belief 

as  predictors.  Church:  frequency  of  attendance  of  church/religious 

gatherings;  Religiosity:  single  question  regarding  religiosity;  Tradit: 

traditional religiosity.

T

able



 1 

C

orrelaTions



 b

eTween


 r

eligiosiTy

 

and


 p

aranorMal

 b

elief


 

for


 

The


 T

oTal


 

s

aMple



 (N = 596)

Quest Intrinsic Extrinsic Religiosity Church

Tradit

PBS_w


.15** .12**

.06


.20***

-.04


.43***

Psi


.12** .10*

.03


.18***

-.02


.35***

Witchcraft

.10*

.09*


.02

.13**


-.05

.31***


Superstition

.04


.05

.10*


.07

 .01


.25***

Spiritualism

.16*** .11*

.04


.21***

-.04


.38***

ExtraLife

.06

.04


.07

.06


-.01

.20***


Precognition .13** .13**

.04


.15***

-.02


.33***

Belief


.07

.14**


.05

.22***


-.03

.37***


 

*p < .05,**p < .01,***p < .001



Note.  PBS_w:  PBS  total  score  without  the  traditional  religiosity  subscale; 

Belief:  single  question  regarding  paranormal  belief;  Church:  frequency 

of attendance of church/religious gatherings; Religiosity: single question 

regarding religiosity; Tradit: traditional religiosity.




298

The Journal of Parapsychology

Multiple  correlations  between  the  different  indices  of  religiosity 

and all aspects of paranormal belief revealed interesting results. (In Table 

2, notice that the multiple correlations give no information on the direction 

of the relationship, as the coefficients are necessarily positive.)

Not surprisingly, the relationship of paranormal belief to traditional 

religiosity  (which  is  part  of  the  PBS)  is  the  highest,  and  this  is  true  for  all 

religious  affiliations.  For  people  without  religious  affiliation,  paranormal 

belief seems to be related to self-reported religiosity and intrinsic religiosity 

(both  coefficients  are  significantly  higher  than  those  of  Catholics,  p  <  .05; 

the  statistical  comparison  of  the  correlations  follows  Clauss  &  Ebner, 

1982). For Protestants, on the other hand, the relationship with extrinsic 

religiosity  is  stronger  than  for  Catholics,  multiple  R  (566)  =  .40  versus 

R  (566)  =  .12,  p  <  .05.  Apart  from  that,  no  differences  are  significant. 

Regression analyses further clarified the type of relationship between 

paranormal  belief  and  religiosity  with  respect  to  religious  affiliation.  For 

the regression analyses the criterion was the total score of the PBS (without 

traditional  religiosity).  Predictors  were  self-reported  religiosity,  church 

attendance,  quest,  and  intrinsic  respectively  extrinsic  religiosity.  For  the 

total  sample  (n  =  590),  only  self-reported  religiosity  (Beta  =  .24,  p  <  .001) 

and  church  attendance  (Beta  =  .17,  p  <  .01)  were  significant  predictors  of 

paranormal belief, (584) = .26, R

2

 = .067, Durbin Watson = 1.84. For Catholics 

(= 419), as can be expected, the results were quite the same (self-reported 

religiosity  and  church  attendance  were  the  only  significant  predictors  of 

paranormal belief). For Protestants (n = 52), self-reported religiosity (Beta 

= .53, < .01) and intrinsic religiosity (Beta = -.59, < .01) were significant 

predictors of paranormal belief, R(46) = .51, R

2 

= .26, Durbin Watson = 2.26, 

with intrinsic religiosity negatively related to paranormal belief. In contrast, 

for participants without religious affiliation  (= 91), intrinsic religiosity was 

the  only,  although  positively  related,  significant  predictor  of  paranormal 

belief: Beta = .35, < .05, (85) = .45, R



2

 = .20, Durbin Watson = 2.14.

T

able


 3 

C

orrelaTions



 b

eTween


 r

eligiosiTy

 

and


 p

aranorMal

 b

elief


 

for


 C

aTholiCs


 

(N = 421)

 

Quest Intrinsic Extrinsic Religiosity Church



Tradit

PBS_w


.11*

.14**


.07

.20**


-.02

.45***


Psi

.12*


.13**

.04


.21**

 .00


.36***

Witchcraft

.08

.07


.01

.11*


-.07

.31***


Superstition

.01


.00

.12*


.04

 .02


.26***

Spiritualism

.13** .15**

.04


.22***

 -01


.41***

ExtraLife

.03

.02


.06

.07


 .01

.21***


Precognition .10*

.17**


.03

.14**


 .00

.30***


Belief

.10*


.16**

.03


.23***

-.04


.35***

 

*



p < .05,**p < .01,***p < .001


299

Paranormal Belief and Religiosity

T

able



 4

C

orrelaTions



 b

eTween


 r

eligiosiTy

 

and


 p

aranorMal

 b

elief


 

for


 p

roTesTanTs

 

(N = 53)



Quest Intrinsic Extrinsic Religiosity Church Tradit

PBS_w


 .04

-.21


.17

 .18


-.07

.59***


Psi

 .10


-.17

.07


 .10

-.03


.53***

Witchcraft

 .01

-.17


.12

 .16


-.11

.52***


Superstition

 .09


-.07

.03


 .08

 .01


.18

Spiritualism

 .02

-.15


.12

 .22


-.07

.57***


ExtraLife

 .04


-.10

.35*


-.01

 .00


.33*

Precognition -.10

-.23

.09


 .15

-.11


.48***

Belief


-.01

-.05


.08

 .12


-.04

.48***


 

*

p < .05,**p < .01,***p < .001

T

able


 5

C

orrelaTions



 b

eTween


 r

eligiosiTy

 

and


 p

aranorMal

 b

elief


 

for


 s

ubjeCTs


 

w

iThouT



 r

eligious


 a

ffiliaTion

 (N = 92)

Quest Intrinsic Extrinsic Religiosity Church

Tradit

PBS_w


.23*

.42***


.13

.39***


 .01

.58***


Psi

.12


.25*

.05


.29**

 .04


.44***

Witchcraft

.17

.35**


.11

.27*


 .03

.49***


Superstition

.10


.21

.05


.22*

 .01


.31***

Spiritualism

.21

.36***


.12

.39***


 .02

.54***


ExtraLife

.04


.32**

.09


.18

 .05


.27**

Precognition .27** .24*

.05

.28**


-.04

.50***


Belief

.03


.28**

.03


.27*

 .07


.47***

 

*



p < .05,**p < .01,***p < .001

Note.  PBS_w:  PBS  total  score  without  traditional  religiosity  subscale; 

Belief:  single  question  regarding  paranormal  belief;  Church:  frequency 

of attendance of church/religious gatherings; Religiosity: single question 

regarding religiosity; Tradit: traditional religiosity.

 

Tables  3-5  show  in  detail  the  correlations  between  the  different 



aspects of paranormal belief and religiosity for Catholics, Protestants, and 

participants without religious affiliation, respectively. 

Because  the  sample  size  was  greater,  many  coefficients  for  the 

Catholics  are  significant.  Nevertheless,  apart  from  traditional  religiosity 

(which possibly reflects response style, because these items were provided 

within the questionnaire concerning paranormal belief), the relationship 




300

The Journal of Parapsychology

between  religiosity  and  paranormal  belief  seems  not  to  be  very  high  for 

Catholics and Protestants. Confirming the results of the regression analyses, 

for  Protestants  paranormal  belief  is  to  some  extent  negatively  related  to 

intrinsic  religiosity,  and  for  participants  without  religious  affiliation  it 

is  the  opposite.  Participants  without  religious  affiliation  also  reveal  the 

highest relationship between paranormal belief and intrinsic religiosity as 

well as with self-reported religiosity. The correlation of the total score of 

paranormal belief with intrinsic religiosity is (90) = .42, < .001 and with 

self-reported religiosity, (90) = .39, < .001. Naturally, church attendance 

or extrinsic religiosity plays no role for them. 

In  short,  a  moderate  positive  relationship  was  found  between 

paranormal  belief  and  religiosity.  The  relationship  was  much  stronger 

for  indices  such  as  intrinsic  religiosity  or  self-reported  religiosity  than 

for  measures  of  extrinsic  religiosity  (which  show  no  correlations  with 

paranormal belief). If one compares the different religious affiliations, the 

relationship between paranormal belief and religiosity is much higher for 

participants without religious affiliation than for Catholics and Protestants. 

(Protestants even show a negative relationship to paranormal belief, which 

means  the  higher  the  intrinsic  religiosity  of  Protestants,  the  lower  is  the 

paranormal  belief.)  For  these  participants,  intrinsic  religiosity  and  self-

reported religiosity were, above all, strongly related to paranormal belief.

Discussion

Studies previously undertaken to examine the relationship between 

religiosity and paranormal belief have already been able to establish some 

evidence of a positive relationship between these two constructs. The aim 

of the current study was to consider different aspects of religiosity as well 

as  different  aspects  of  paranormal  belief.  Another  aim  was  to  compare 

the results with regard to religious affiliation. In contrast to some studies 

(Beck  &  Miller,  2001;  Emmons  &  Sobal,  1981),  our  results  suggest  an 

overall  positive  relationship  between  traditional  religiosity  and  the  other 

subscales  of  the  PBS  among  Austrian  students,  especially  with  belief  in 

psi,  spiritualism,  and  precognition,  confirming  the  results  of  Haraldsson 

(1981).  Therefore,  we  conclude,  contrary  to  Thalbourne  and  O’Brien 

(1999),  that  the  association  between  paranormal  belief  and  religiosity  is 

not  restricted  to  Iceland.  However,  it  is  necessary  to  exercise  caution  in 

interpreting  this  result,  as  the  high  correlations  among  all  subscales  of 

the PBS could also indicate the presence of answering in accordance with 

response style. Aside from these results, for the entire sample, paranormal 

belief  is  mainly  related  to  self-reported  religiosity  (this  is  in  line  with 

Thalbourne & Hensley, 2001) and to some extent also with the quest scale. 

However,  for  Catholics  the  relationship  to  paranormal  belief  is  small,  as 

it also is for Protestants, who even exhibit a negative correlation between 



301

Paranormal Belief and Religiosity

intrinsic religiosity and paranormal belief. Although participants without 

religious affiliation report themselves as less religious, and although they 

have the lowest values on all the religiosity scales (note, however, that only 

extrinsic religiosity is significantly lower in comparison to Protestants and 

Catholics), if they do believe in paranormal phenomena to some extent, 

this  belief  is  accompanied  by  religiosity  (primarily  intrinsic  religiosity). 

These results concerning the participants without religious affiliation are 

partly in accordance with the hypothesis that paranormal belief functions 

as a substitute for religious belief (Persinger & Makarec, 1990; Thalbourne 

& O’Brien, 1999). 

Perhaps past inconclusive results with respect to the relationship 

between  paranormal  belief  and  religion  can  be  explained  by  the  fact 

that most researchers either report correlations to support the thesis of a 

relationship between paranormal belief and religiosity (such as Thalbourne 

&  Brien,  1999;  Thalbourne  &  Hensley,  2001)  or  they  report  differences 

between  religious  and  nonreligious  participants  (such  as  Williams, 

Taylor, & Hintze, 1989), but not both of the analyses (Tobacyk & Pirttilae-

Backman, 1992, are an exception). But from lower religiosity for believers 

in paranormal phenomena it does not necessarily follow that on average 

there is no relationship to paranormal belief. Thus, our results suggest a 

modified  version  of  the  substitution  hypothesis:  for  participants  without 

religious affiliation, paranormal belief is a possible substitute for traditional 

religion, and if they report themselves as religious they believe across the 

board in religion and the paranormal. But most of them believe neither in 

paranormal phenomena (as is the case of people with a religious affiliation) 

nor in a traditional religion; in all indices of religious belief, participants 

without religious affiliation have the smallest values. In any case, it can be 

assumed that people without religious affiliation do not differentiate much 

between the contents of the paranormal and those of religion. 

The results of our study underline that it is necessary to compare 

different religious affiliations with regard to the relationship to paranormal 

belief.  They  also  show  that  both  religiosity  and  paranormal  belief  are 

multidimensional  constructs  that  do  not  allow  a  simple  answer  to  the 

question of whether paranormal belief and religious belief are related.

Although we believe that our results can be generalized to some 

extent, at least within Western societies, in some respects the validity of our 

results is restricted to young students in Austria, who, despite the country’s 

predominantly  Catholic  history,  nowadays  live  in  a  rather  secularized 

cultural context and are not very religious in the traditional sense. It would 

be  interesting  to  see  whether  these  results  also  hold  for  highly  religious 

people in the traditional meaning of the word. One other obvious limitation 

of our research is that the group with a different religious orientation was 

not of equal size to the others and that our sample did not contain enough 

people of other major religions (e.g., Jews, Moslems, or Buddhists). Further 

research is needed to accomplish this goal.




302

The Journal of Parapsychology

References

Batson, C. D., & Schoenrede, P. A.

 (1991). Measuring religion as quest: 

2, Reliability concerns. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 30

430-447.


Beck,  R.,  &  Miller,  J.  P.

  (2001).  Erosion  of  belief  and  disbelief:  Effects 

of religiosity and negative affect on beliefs in the paranormal and 

supernatural. The Journal of Social Psychology, 14, 277-287.

Clauss, E., & Ebner, F.

 (1982). Statistik für Soziologen, Pädagogen, Psychologen 



und Mediziner [statistics for sociologists, pedagogics, psychologists 

and physicians]. Frankfurt: Deutsch.

Curran,  P.  J.,  West,  S.  G.,  &  Finch,  J.  F

.  (1996).  The  robustness  of  test 

statistics to nonnormality and specification error in confirmatory 

factor analysis. Psychological Methods1, 16-29.

DeCarlo, L. T. (1997). On the meaning and use of kurtosis. Psychological 

Methods, 2, 292-307.

Emmons,  C.  F.,  &  Sobal,  J.

  (1981).  Paranormal  beliefs:  Functional 

alternatives to mainstream religion? Review of Religious Research, 22

310-312.

Goode,  E.

  (2000).  Two  paranormals  or  two  and  a  half?  An  empirical 

exploration. Skeptical Inquirer, 24, 29-35.

Gorsuch,  R.  L.,  &  McPherson,  S.  E.

  (1989).  Intrinsic/extrinsic 

measurement:  I/E  revised  and  single  item  scales.  Journal  for  the 

Scientific Study of Religion28, 348-354.

Haraldsson,  E.

  (1981).  Some  determinants  of  belief  in  psychical 

phenomena. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research, 75

297-309.

Irwin,  H.  J.

  (1985).  A  study  of  the  measurement  and  the  correlates  of 

paranormal belief. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research, 



79, 301-326.

Irwin,  H.  J.

  (1993).  Belief  in  the  paranormal:  A  review  of  the  empirical 

literature. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research, 87, 1-39.

Küpper, B., & Bierhoff, H.

 (1999). Liebe Deinen Nächsten, sei hilfreich 

.  .  .  Hilfeleistung  ehrenamtlicher  Helfer  im  Zusammenhang  mit 

Motiven und Religiosität. [Love Your Neighbour, do good to him   

. . . The helping behaviour of volunteers in relation to motives and 

religiosity].  Zeitschrift  für  Differentielle  und  Diagnostische  Psychologie, 



20, 217-230.

Orenstein,  A.

  (2002).  Religion  and  paranormal  belief.  Journal  for  the 

Scientific Study of Religion, 41, 301-311.

Persinger, M. A., & Makarec, K.

 (1990). Exotic beliefs may be substitutes 

for religious beliefs. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 71, 16-18.

Rice, T.  W.

 (2003). Believe it or not: Religious and other paranormal beliefs in 

the United States. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 42, 95-106. 

Sparks,  G.  G.

  (2001).  The  relationship  between  paranormal  beliefs  and 

religious beliefs. Skeptical Inquirer, 25, 50-56.

Stevens, J.

 (1996). Applied multivariate statistics for the social sciences. Hillsdale, 

NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. 



303

Paranormal Belief and Religiosity

Thalbourne, M. A.

 (2003). Theism and belief in the paranormal. Journal 

for the Society for Psychical Research67, 208-210.          

Thalbourne, M. A., & O’Brien, R.

 (1999). Belief in the paranormal and 

religious variables. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 63

110-122.

Thalbourne, M. A., & Delin, P. S.

 (1993). A new instrument for measuring 

the  sheep-goat  variable:  Its  psychometric  properties  and  factor 

structure. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research59, 172-186.

Thalbourne, M. A., & Hensley, J. H.

 (2001). Religiosity and belief in the 

paranormal. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 65, 47.

Thalbourne, M. A., & Houtkooper, J. M.

 (2002). Religiosity/spirituality 

and belief in the paranormal: A German replication. Journal of the 

Society for Psychical Research, 66, 113-115.

Tobacyk, J. J., & Milford, G.

 (1983). Belief in paranormal phenomena: 

Assessment  instrument  development  and  implications  for 

personality functioning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 

44, 1029-1037.

Tobacyk,  J.  J.,  &  Pirttilae-Backman,  A.  M.

  (1992).  Paranormal  beliefs 

and their implications in university students from Finland and the 

United States. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 23, 59-71.

Williams,  R.  N.,  Taylor,  C.  B.,  &  Hintze,  W.  J.

  (1989).  The  influence 

of  religious  orientation  on  belief  in  science,  religion,  and  the 

paranormal. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 17, 352-359.

Wilson,  G.  D.

  (1975).  Manual  for  the  Wilson-Patterson  Attitude  Inventory

Windsor: NFER Publishing.

Zusne, L., & Jones, W. H.

 (1989). Anomalistic psychology: A study of magical 



thinking. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Faculty of Psychology

Department of Basic Psychological Research

The University of Vienna

Liebigg. 5

1010 Vienna, Austria

andreas.hergovich@univie.ac.at


Yüklə 129,41 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə