Table Of Contents 1 Title Page



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Table Of Contents

  • 1………………….…………………………………………………..Title Page

  • 2………………….………………………………………..….….…..Table Of Contents

  • 3…………………..……………………………………….……..…..Introduction

  • 4……………………..……………………………………….…….....Anne & The Frank Family

  • 5……………………..…………………………………………..…....Adolf Hitler

  • 6………………………..……………………………………………..Nazis

  • 7…………………………………………………………………..…..Kristallnacht

  • 8……………………………………………………………………....Ghettos

  • 9…………………………………………………………………...….Ghettos Map Area

  • 10 …………………………………………………………………….Nuremburg Laws

  • 11 ………………………………………………………………..…..Concentration, Labor & Death Camps

  • 12………………………………....................................................The Camps

  • 13 …………………………………………………………………....Deportation

  • 14…………………………………………………………….………D-Day

  • 15 ………………………………………………………………..…..Survivors of Camps

  • 16 ………………………………………………………………..…..Death Toll

  • 17………………………………………………………………….…Participants In The War

  • 18…………………………………………………………….………After Holocaust Population

  • 19…………………………………………………….………………Conclusion

  • 20…………………………………………………………………….Bibliography



Introduction

  • Holocaust is the name applied to describe the attempted genocide of Europe's Jewish population during World War II, as part of a program of ridding Europe of "undesirables" by the National Socialist led by Adolf Hitler. In addition to Jews, the Nazi regime persecuted and killed other groups, Taking into account all the victims of Nazi persecution, the total number of victims at 9 to 18 million. Adolf Hitler ostracized an entire race of people by deliberately discriminating against everyone that was not of the Aryan race



Anne & The Frank Family

  • Anne Frank was a European Jewish girl born in Germany, who wrote a Diary while in hiding with her family and four friends in Amsterdam during the German Occupation of the Netherlands in WWII. Anne was born in Frankfurt Germany, but her family moved to Amsterdam in 1933, after the Nazi gained power in Germany. As A result the family went into hiding in July 1942 in the secret Annex (which were secret rooms) in her father Otto Frank's office building. After two years in hiding the group was found and transported to concentration camps. Seven months after her arrest, Anne died of typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp within days of her sister, Margot Frank. Her father, Otto, the only survivor of the group, returned to Amsterdam after the war ended, to find that her diary had been saved.



Adolf Hitler

  • Adolf Hitler was born on 20th April, 1889, in the small Austrian town of Braunau near the German border. Both Hitler's parents had come from poor peasant families. Later Hitler became Chancellor of Germany from 1933, until his death. He was leader of the Nazi Party. At their greatest extent, Nazi Germany and the Axis Powers occupied most of Europe, but were eventually defeated by the Allies. By the end of the war, Hitler's racial policies had culminated in the killing of approximately 11 million people, including the genocide of some 6 million Jews, in what is now known as the Holocaust. In the final days of the war, Hitler, along with his new wife, Eva Braun, committed suicide in his underground bunker in Berlin, as the city was being overrun by the Red Army of the Soviet Union.



Nazis

  • National Socialist German Workers' Party, founded in Germany in 1919 and brought to power in 1933 under Adolf Hitler. Nazi members never went by “Nazi” they always went by National Socialists



Kristallnacht

  • For 2 days (November 9–10, 1938) Jewish homes and stores were ransacked in a thousand German cities, towns and villages, as ordinary citizens and storm troopers destroyed buildings with sledgehammers, leaving the streets covered in smashed windows "Night of Broken Glass." Jews were beaten to death; 30,000 Jewish men were taken to concentration camps; and 1,668 synagogues were destroyed or set on fire.



Ghettos

  • The Warsaw Ghetto was the largest of the Jewish ghettos established by Nazi Germany in General Government during the Holocaust in World War II. In the three years of its existence, starvation, disease and deportations to concentration camps and extermination camps dropped the population of the ghetto from an estimated 450,000 to 37,000. The Warsaw Ghetto was the scene of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, one of the first mass uprisings against Nazi occupation in Europe.





Nuremberg Laws

  • The Nazis announced new laws which excluded German Jews from Reich citizenship and prohibited them from marrying or having sexual relations with persons of "German or related blood." This Law also Prohibited most political rights.



Concentration, Labor & Death Camps

  • Were the facilities constructed by Nazi Germany in World War II where the Nazis systematically killed millions of people. Bodies of those killed by the Nazis were usually either cremated or buried in mass graves. Members of groups whom the Nazis wished to exterminate included Jews, Roma Serbs, Soviet prisoners of war, Poles, Communists, Jehovah's Witnesses, and homosexuals among others, were also killed in these camps. The majority of prisoners at these camps were not expected to live more than 24 hours beyond arrival.





Deportation

  • Jews and people of other races were deported to concentration camps, labor camps & death camps. Hitler and the Nazi's used methods of propaganda to get people to go to these dreadful places.



D-Day

  • On June 6, 1944, a date known ever since as D-Day, a fleet of ships crossed a narrow strip of sea from England to Normandy, France, and cracked the Nazi grip on western Europe.



Survivors of Camps

  • As of 2005, of the nearly 400,000 Holocaust survivors residing in Israel, 40% live below the poverty line, increasing significantly since 1999

  • Otto Frank (Anne Franks father) is one of the few survivors of Auschwitz death camps.



Death Toll

  • An estimated 5 to 6 million Jews, including 3 million Polish Jews

  • 1.8 – 1.9 million Christian Poles and other (non-Jewish) Poles (estimate includes civilians killed as a result of Nazi aggression and occupation but does not include the military casualties of Nazi aggression or the victims of the Soviet occupation of eastern Poland and of deportations to Central Asia and Siberia)

  • 200,000–800,000 Roma & Sinti (Gypsies)

  • 200,000–300,000 people with disabilities

  • 80,000-200,000 European Freemasons

  • 100,000 communists

  • 10,000–25,000 homosexual men

  • 2,500–5,000 Jehovah's Witnesses

  • Auschwitz II: about 1,400,000

  • Belzec: at least 436,000

  • Chelmno:at least 152,000

  • Majdanek: 78,000 - 235,000

  • Sobibór: at least 170,000

  • Treblinka: at least 800,000

  • Jasenovac: 500,000-840,000

  • Maly Trostenets: at least 60,000



Participants In The War

  • ParticipantsTimelineSpecific articles Allies United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Rep. of China Poland France Free France Netherlands Belgium Canada Norway Greece Yugoslavia Czechoslovakia Philippines India Australia New Zealand South Africa Brazil



After The Holocaust Population



Conclusion

  • The Holocaust was one of the darkest hours in the history of humanity. Hitler's plan to eliminate the Jews and final solution nearly became a reality. Although Germany was a modern and civilized nation, the lives of over 11 million people were taken. The question remains, why was the Holocaust allowed to happen? Could it happen again?



Bibliography

  • “The Holocaust” Spartacus. New York

  • Publishing Company. 2/27/06.

  • www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERhitler.ht

  • “Adolf Hitler” Wikipedia. New York Times

  • Publishing Company. 2/27/06.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolf_hitler

  • Sheehan, Sean “The Death Camps” The Holocaust.

  • 2001. Raintree Steck Vaughn Publishers. 2/27/06.




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