Tutorial Ellipsoid, geoid, gravity, geodesy, and geophysics



Yüklə 195,75 Kb.

tarix11.04.2018
ölçüsü195,75 Kb.


GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001); P. 1660

1668, 4 FIGS., 3 TABLES.



Tutorial

Ellipsoid, geoid, gravity, geodesy, and geophysics

Xiong Li


and Hans-J ¨urgen G ¨otze

ABSTRACT


Geophysics uses gravity to learn about the den-

sity variations of the Earth’s interior, whereas classical

geodesy uses gravity to define the geoid. This difference

in purpose has led to some confusion among geophysi-

cists, and this tutorial attempts to clarify two points of

the confusion. First, it is well known now that gravity

anomalies after the “free-air” correction are still located

at their original positions. However, the “free-air” re-

duction was thought historically to relocate gravity from

its observation position to the geoid (mean sea level).

Such an understanding is a geodetic fiction, invalid and

unacceptable in geophysics. Second, in gravity correc-

tions and gravity anomalies, the elevation has been used

routinely. The main reason is that, before the emergence

and widespread use of the Global Positioning System

(GPS), height above the geoid was the only height mea-

surement we could make accurately (i.e., by leveling).

The GPS delivers a measurement of height above the

ellipsoid. In principle, in the geophysical use of gravity,

the ellipsoid height rather than the elevation should be

used throughout because a combination of the latitude

correction estimated by the International Gravity For-

mula and the height correction is designed to remove

the gravity effects due to an ellipsoid of revolution. In

practice, for minerals and petroleum exploration, use of

the elevation rather than the ellipsoid height hardly in-

troduces significant errors across the region of investi-

gation because the geoid is very smooth. Furthermore,

the gravity effects due to an ellipsoid actually can be

calculated by a closed-form expression. However, its ap-

proximation, by the International Gravity Formula and

the height correction including the second-order terms,

is typically accurate enough worldwide.

INTRODUCTION

Geophysics has traditionally borrowed concepts of gravity

corrections and gravity anomalies from geodesy. Their uncrit-

ical use has sometimes had unfortunate results. For example,

the “free-air” reduction was historically interpreted by geode-

sists as reducing gravity from topographic surface to the geoid

(mean sea level). This interpretation is a useful fiction for

geodetic purposes, but is completely inappropriate for geo-

physics. In geophysics, gravity is used to learn about the den-

sity variations of the Earth’s interior. In geodesy, gravity helps

define the figure of the Earth, the geoid. This difference in pur-

pose determines a difference in the way to correct observed

data and to understand resulting anomalies.

Until a global geodetic datum is fully and formally accepted,

used, and implemented worldwide, global geodetic applica-

Published on Geophysics Online May 31, 2001. Manuscript received by the Editor August 9, 2000; Revised manuscript received February 26, 2001.

Fugro-LCT Inc., 6100 Hillcroft, 5th Floor, Houston, Texas 77081. E-mail: xli@fugro.com.



‡Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f ¨ur Geologie, Geophysik and Geoinformatik, Malteserstraße 74-100, D-12249 Berlin, Germany. E-mail: hajo@

geophysik.fu-berlin.de.

c

2001 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.



tions require three different surfaces to be clearly defined. They

are (Figure 1): the highly irregular topographic surface (the

landmass topography as well as the ocean bathymetry), a geo-

metric or mathematical reference surface called the ellipsoid,

and the geoid, the equipotential surface that mean sea level

follows.


Gravity is closely associated with these three surfaces. Grav-

ity corrections and gravity anomalies have been traditionally

defined with respect to the elevation. Before the emergence

of satellite technologies and, in particular, the widespread

use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), height above

the geoid (i.e., the elevation) was the only height measure-

ment we could make accurately, namely by leveling. The

GPS delivers a measurement of height above the ellipsoid.

Confusion seems to have arisen over which height to use in

geophysics.



1660


Correctly Understanding Gravity

1661

This tutorial explains the concepts of, and relationships

among, the ellipsoid, geoid, gravity, geodesy, and geophysics.

We attempt to clarify the way to best compute gravity correc-

tions given GPS positioning. In short, h, the ellipsoid height

relative to the ellipsoid, is the sum of H, the elevation relative

to the geoid, and N, the geoid height (undulation) relative to

the ellipsoid (Figure 2):



h

N.

(1)

The geoid undulations, gravity anomalies, and gravity gradient



changes all reflect, but are different measures of, the density

variations of the Earth. The difference between the geophys-

ical use of gravity and the geodetic use of gravity mirrors the

difference between the ellipsoid and the geoid.

ELLIPSOID

As a first approximation, the Earth is a rotating sphere. As a

second approximation, it can be regarded as an equipotential

ellipsoid of revolution.

According to Moritz (1980), the theory of the equipotential

ellipsoid was first given by P. Pizzetti in 1894. It was further

elaborated by C. Somigliana in 1929. This theory served as

the basis for the International Gravity Formula adopted at the

General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and

Geophysics (IUGG) in Stockholm in 1930. One particular el-

lipsoid of revolution, also called the “normal Earth,” is the one

having the same angular velocity and the same mass as the ac-

tual Earth, the potential U

0

on the ellipsoid surface equal to the



potential W

0

on the geoid, and the center coincident with the



center of mass of the Earth. The Geodetic Reference System

1967 (GRS 67), Geodetic Reference System 1980 (GRS 80),

F

IG

. 1. Cartoon showing the ellipsoid, geoid, and topographic



surface (the landmass topography as well as the ocean

bathymetry).

F

IG

. 2. The elevation above the geoid, the ellipsoid height



h, and the geoid height (undulation) above the ellipsoid.

and World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 84) all are “normal

Earth.”

Although the Earth is not an exact ellipsoid, the equipoten-



tial ellipsoid furnishes a simple, consistent and uniform refer-

ence system for all purposes of geodesy as well as geophysics:

a reference surface for geometric use such as map projec-

tions and satellite navigation, and a normal gravity field on

the Earth’s surface and in space, defined in terms of closed

formulas, as a reference for gravimetry and satellite geodesy.

The gravity field of an ellipsoid is of fundamental practical im-

portance because it is easy to handle mathematically, and the

deviations of the actual gravity field from the ellipsoidal “theo-

retical” or “normal” field are small. This splitting of the Earth’s

gravity field into a “normal” and a remaining small “disturb-

ing” or “anomalous” field considerably simplifies many prob-

lems: the determination of the geoid (for geodesists), and the

use of gravity anomalies to understand the Earth’s interior (for

geophysicists).

Although an ellipsoid has many geometric and physical pa-

rameters, it can be fully defined by any four independent pa-

rameters. All the other parameters can be derived from the

four defining parameters. Table 1 lists the two geometric pa-

rameters of several representative ellipsoids. Notice how the

parameters differ, depending on the choice of ellipsoid.

One of the principal purposes of a world geodetic system is

to supersede the local horizontal geodetic datums developed

to satisfy mapping and navigation requirements for specific re-

gions of the Earth. A particular reference ellipsoid was used to

help define a local datum. For example, the Australian National

ellipsoid (Table 1) was used to define the Australian Geodetic

Datum 1966. At present, because of a widespread use of GPS,

many local datums have been updated using the GRS 80 or

WGS 84 ellipsoid.

GRS 80 and WGS 84

Modern satellite technology has greatly improved determi-

nation of the Earth’s ellipsoid. As shown in Table 1, the semi-

major axis of the International 1924 ellipsoid is 251 m larger

than for the GRS 80 or WGS 84 ellipsoid, which represents the

current best global geodetic reference system for the Earth.

WGS 84 was designed for use as the reference system for the

GPS. The WGS 84 Coordinate System is a conventional terres-

trial reference system. When selecting the WGS 84 ellipsoid

and associated parameters, the original WGS 84 Development

Committee decided to adhere closely to the IUGG’s approach

in establishing and adopting GRS 80.

GRS 80 has four defining parameters: the semimajor axis

(= 6 378 137 m), the geocentric gravitational constant of the

Table 1. Examples of different reference ellipsoids and their

geometric parameters.

Semimajor axis

Reciprocal of

Ellipsoid name

(in meters)

flattening (1/ )

Airy 1830

6 377 563.396

299.324 964 6

Helmert 1906

6 378 200

298.3

International 1924



6 378 388

297


Australian National

6 378 160

298.25

GRS 1967


6 378 160

298.247 167 427

GRS 1980

6 378 137

298.257 222 101

WGS 1984


6 378 137

298.257 223 563




1662

Li and G ¨otze

Earth including the atmosphere (G M = 3 986 005 × 10

8

m

3



/s

2

),



the dynamic form factor (J

2

= 108 263 × 10



8

) of the Earth ex-

cluding the permanent tidal deformation, and the angular ve-

locity (ω = 7 292 115 × 10

−11

rad/s) of the Earth (Moritz, 1980).



Besides the same values of and ω as GRS 80, the

current WGS 84 (National Imagery and Mapping Agency,

2000) uses both an improved determination of the geocen-

tric gravitational constant (G M = 3 986 004.418 ×10

8

m

3



/s

2

)



and, as one of the four defining parameters, the reciprocal

(1/ = 298.257 223 563) of flattening instead of J

2

. This flat-



tening is derived from the normalized second-degree zonal

gravitational coefficient (C

2,0

) through an accepted, rigorous



expression, and turned out slightly different from the GRS 80

flattening because the C

2,0

value is truncated in the normal-



ization process. The small differences between the GRS 80

ellipsoid and the current WGS 84 ellipsoid have virtually no

practical consequence.

APPROXIMATE CALCULATION OF THEORETICAL

GRAVITY DUE TO AN ELLIPSOID

The theoretical or normal gravity, or gravity reference field,

is the gravity effect due to an equipotential ellipsoid of rev-

olution. Approximate formulas are used widely even though

we can calculate the exact theoretical gravity analytically. Ap-

pendix A gives closed-form expressions as well as approximate

ones. In particular, equation (A-2) (see Appendix A) estimates

in a closed form the theoretical gravity at any position on,

above, or below the ellipsoid.

The International Gravity Formula

The conventionally used International Gravity Formula is

obtained by substituting the parameters of the relevant ref-

erence ellipsoid into equation (A-3). Helmert’s 1901 Gravity

Formula, and International Gravity Formulas 1930, 1967, and

1980, correspond respectively to the Helmert 1906, Interna-

tional 1924, GRS 67, and GRS 80 ellipsoids. For example, the

1980 International Gravity Formula is (Moritz, 1980)

γ

1980



= 978 032.7(1 + 0.005 302 4 sin

2

φ



− 0.000 005 8 sin

2

2φ) mGal,



(2)

where φ is the geodetic latitude.

The resulting difference between the 1980 International

Gravity Formula and the 1930 International Gravity Formula

is

γ

1980



− γ

1930


= −16.3 + 13.7 sin

2

φ



mGal,

where the main difference is due to a change from the

Potsdam gravity reference datum used in the 1930 formula to

the International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 (IGSN71)

reference.

The first term of the International Gravity Formula is the

value of gravity at the equator on the ellipsoid surface. Unfor-

tunately, in the 1930s, no one really knew what it was. The most

reliable estimate at that time was based on absolute gravity

measurements made by pendulums at the Geodetic Institute

Potsdam in 1906. The Potsdam gravity value served as an ab-

solute datum for worldwide gravity networks from 1909 until

1971. In the 1960s, new measurements across continents made

by precise absolute and relative gravity meters became the net-

work of IGSN71 still in use today. A mean difference between

the Potsdam datum and the IGSN71 reference has been found

to be 14 mGal (Woollard, 1979).

Similarly, we can compare the 1967 formula to the 1980 for-

mula in use today. The difference between the two is relatively

small:


γ

1980


− γ

1967


= 0.8316 + 0.0782 sin

2

φ



mGal.

The height correction

The International Gravity Formula estimates the change

with latitude on the ellipsoid surface of theoretical gravity

due to an ellipsoid. The height correction accounts for the

change of theoretical gravity due to the station’s being located

above or below the ellipsoid at ellipsoid height h. Historically,

this height correction has been called the “free-air” correction

and thought to be associated with the elevation H, not the

ellipsoid height h. In geodesy, the “free-air” correction was

interpreted fictitiously as a reduction to the geoid of gravity

observed on the topographic surface. This has given rise to

confusion in geophysics (e.g., Nettleton, 1976, 88).

As a second approximation, the height correction is given in

equation (A-4). For the GRS 80 ellipsoid, we have

δ

g



h2

= γ


h

− γ = −(0.308 769 1 − 0.000 439 8 sin

2

φ

)h



+ 7.2125 × 10

−8

h

2

mGal.


(3)

However, in exploration geophysics, a first-order formula is

widely used, rather than this second approximation.

The famous 0.3086 correction factor

For the International 1924 ellipsoid, the second approxima-

tion of the height correction is (Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967,

80)

δ

g



h2

= −(0.308 77 − 0.000 45 sin

2

φ

)+ 0.000 072h



2

.

Ignoring the second-order term and setting φ = 45



, we obtain

the first approximation of the height correction

δ

g



h1

= −0.3086mGal.

(4)

This is just the famous, routinely used, approximate height cor-



rection. Again, in exploration geophysics, it is commonly called

the (first-order) “free-air” correction and is used with the ele-

vation rather than the ellipsoid height h.

Errors of approximate formulas

For the GRS 80 ellipsoid, as a first approximation equa-

tions (2) and (4) are combined to predict the theoretical gravity

at a position above (or below) the ellipsoid. The result is

γ

1



1980

= γ


1980

+ δg



h1

.

(5)



A second approximation is a combination of equations (2) and

(3):


γ

2

1980



= γ

1980


+ δg

h2

.

(6)




Correctly Understanding Gravity

1663

These two approximate formulas can be compared to the value

given by the closed-form formula (A-2). The two differences

are denoted as



g

1

= γ



1

1980


− γ

(7)


and

g

2

= γ



2

1980


− γ.

(8)


For an ellipsoid height of 3000 m, differences versus latitudes

are given in Table 2. Table 3 shows differences versus ellipsoid

heights at 45

latitude.



Because the differences

g

2

shown in Tables 2 and 3 are



smaller than typical exploration survey errors, equation (A-4),

together with the International Gravity Formula, produces a

sufficiently accurate approximation of the exact theoretical

gravity value worldwide. This equation includes the second-

order ellipsoid height terms. For the GRS 80 ellipsoid, equa-

tion (A-4) becomes equation (3).

GEOID

The geoid is a surface of constant potential energy that co-



incides with mean sea level over the oceans. This definition is

not very rigorous. First, mean sea level is not quite a surface of

constant potential due to dynamic processes within the ocean.

Second, the actual equipotential surface under continents is

warped by the gravitational attraction of the overlying mass.

But geodesists define the geoid as though that mass were always

underneath the geoid instead of above it. The main function

of the geoid in geodesy is to serve as a reference surface for

leveling. The elevation measured by leveling is relative to the

geoid.


GEODESY: CONVERSION OF GRAVITY TO GEOID

Originally, geodesy was a science solely concerned with

global surveying, with the objective of tying local survey nets to-

gether by doing careful surveying over long distances. Geode-

sists tell local surveyors where their positions are with respect

to the rest of the world. That includes determining the elevation

above sea level.

Why should gravity enter into geodesy?

Many geodetic instruments use gravity as reference. Clearly,

mean sea level serves as a reference surface for leveling, and

the elevation is relative to mean sea level. In theory, mean sea

Table 2. Differences ∆g

1

in equation (7) and ∆g



2

in equation (8) of theoretical gravity in equation (A-2) and the two approxi-

mations in equations (5) and (6) at an ellipsoid height of 3000 m and different geodetic latitudes.

latitude


0

15



30



45

60



75



90



g

1

(mGal)


−0.114

−0.192


−0.411

−0.728


−1.079

−1.363


−1.474

g

2

(mGal)



0.028

0.038


0.061

0.073


0.052

0.009


−0.013

Table 3. Differences ∆g

1

in equation (7) and ∆g



2

in equation (8) of theoretical gravity in equation (A-2) and the two approxi-

mations in equations (5) and (6) at geodetic latitude of 45

◦◦

and different ellipsoid heights.



height (m)

10

100



500

1000


2000

3000


4000

5000


6000

g

1

(mGal)



0.044

0.040


0.006

−0.068


−0.326

−0.728


−1.276

−1.968


−2.805

g

2

(mGal)



0.045

0.046


0.050

0.055


0.064

0.073


0.081

0.089


0.096

level could be determined by regular observations at perma-

nent tidal gauge stations. However, one can not very accurately

determine the elevation at a location far away from and not

tightly tied to an elevation datum defining mean sea level. In

practice, the geoid replaces mean sea level as a reference sur-

face for leveling. When we level, what we really measure are

the elevations above (or below) the geoid. When geodesists or

surveyors say a surface is horizontal, they really mean that it

is a surface of constant gravitational potential. So, geodesists

have always had to measure gravity—in addition to relative

positions—which is why gravity historically was regarded as

part of geodesy.

The very early gravity work with pendulum equipment was

for geodetic purposes alone. Pierre Bouguer was probably the

first to make this kind of observation when he led the expedi-

tions of the French Academy of Sciences to Peru in 1735–1743.

Geophysical use of gravity observations started much later.

The first use for geological investigation may have been when

Hugo de Boeckh, who was at that time the Director of the

Geological Survey of Hungary, asked Baron Roland von

E ¨otv ¨os to do a torsion balance survey over the then one-well

oil field of Egbell (Gbely) in Slovakia. This survey was carried

out in 1915–1916 and showed a clear maximum over the known

anticline (Eckhardt, 1940).

Geodesists determine the Earth’s figure (i.e., the geoid) in

two steps. First, they reduce to the geoid the gravity, observed

on the actual Earth’s surface. Second, from the reduced gravity,

they calculate the geoid undulations (i.e., the deviations from

the ellipsoid surface).

The free-air reduction: An historical concept and requirement

of classical geodesy

Gravity is measured on the actual surface of the Earth. In

order to determine the geoid, the masses outside the geoid

must be completely removed or moved inside the geoid by the

various gravity corrections, and gravity must be reduced onto

the geoid. Geodesists need the elevation relative to the geoid

when they derive the geoid from gravity.

For a reduction of gravity to the geoid, they need the vertical

gradient of gravity, ∂g/∂ H. Note that H



a, the semimajor

axis of the ellipsoid. If g

s

is the observed value on the surface



of the Earth, then the value g

g

on the geoid may be obtained



as a Taylor series expansion. Neglecting all but the linear term,

geodesists obtain



g

g

g



s

F,




1664

Li and G ¨otze

where


F

= −




g



H



H

≈ −0.3086mGal.

(9)

Equation (9) continues to be called the “free-air” effect.



Geodesists have assumed that there are no masses above the

geoid, or that such masses have been removed beforehand, so

that this reduction is as though it were done in “free air”. It

is so called because, after removal of the topography by the

complete Bouguer reduction, the gravity station is left hanging

in “free air” (Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967, 131).

In classical geodesy, geodesists employed the fiction that the

“free-air” reduction condensed the topographic masses and

lowered the station onto the geoid, whereby the geoid became

a bounding surface of the terrestrial masses, and gravity g

g

was


on the geoid (Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967, 145). Therefore,

Stokes’ formula can be used to calculate geoid undulations

from gravity. Unfortunately, geophysicists have often misun-

derstood and misused this geodetic philosophy.

Calculating geoid undulations from gravity

After estimating g

g

, gravity on the geoid, geodesists can



then derive the geoid. For a simplification, we take as example

the spherically symmetric, rotating Earth. The derivation from

gravity to the geoid consists of three substeps (Wahr, 1997, 104–

108). First, calculate δg, the angular-dependent component of



g

g

, by the following relation:



g

g



G M



a

2



2

3

ω



2

a

+ δg.

Then solve

∂δ

V



r

+

2



a

δ

V

= −δg

to find δ, the angular-dependent component of the gravita-

tional potential. Finally, the geoid shape is given by the Bruns

formula


F

IG

. 3. The 15



× 15 global geoid undulations produced by EGM96 (Lemoine et al., 1998). The undulations range from −107 m to

85 m. Black lines indicate coast lines.

δ

r

=

δ



V

γ

,



where γ is the theoretical gravity on the surface of the spherical

earth and δis the departure of the geoid from a sphere.

In general and in practice, the geoid undulations are denoted

by N. They are the departure from an ellipsoid and can be

calculated using Stokes’ formula. Details can be found in books

on physical geodesy (e.g., Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967; Wahr,

1997).

Geoid model



Equation (1) connects (the ellipsoid height relative to the

ellipsoid), (the geoid undulation relative to the ellipsoid),

and (the elevation relative to the geoid) (Figure 2).

The geoid undulations range worldwide from −107 m to

85 m relative to the WGS 84 ellipsoid. The primary goal of

geodesy is to develop a geoid model, which is then used to

connect the three values. Given N, we can compute or h

from the other. For example, when we use GPS as a posi-

tioning tool, we measure the ellipsoid height h. The eleva-

tion can be estimated by equation (1) if we have a geoid

model.

In general, the global or large-scale features of the geoid



are expressed by a spherical harmonic expansion of the grav-

itational potential. Its higher terms are well defined by the

ground gravity data, and the lower terms by the satellite track-

ing data. The Earth Gravitational Model 1996 (EGM96) is one

of the latest global models. It is complete through degree and

order 360. The EGM96 global geoid undulations are shown in

Figure 3, and have an error range of ±0.5 to ±1.0 m worldwide

(Lemoine et al., 1998). The U.S. National Imagery and Mapping

Agency recommends that it be used together with the WGS 84

reference ellipsoid (National Imagery and Mapping Agency,

2000).



Correctly Understanding Gravity

1665

Short-wavelength geoid undulations

The relation between spherical harmonic degree and wave-

length λ of geoid undulations is:

λ

=

2π R



n

40 000 000



n

,

(10)



where = 6 371 000 m is the average radius of the Earth.

EGM96 extends to degree and order 360 and thus has the short-

est spatial wavelength of 111 km.

At present, there exists no published truly global geoid

model that extends beyond degree 360 (i.e., contains a wave-

length of shorter than 111 km). Several empirical relations have

been established to estimate how the expected power of global

gravity and geoid signals drops off with an increase in degree

of the spherical harmonic model (Kaula, 1966; Tscherning and

Rapp, 1974; Jekeli, 1978). All these relations estimate that the

global rms geoid undulation signals are less than 2 cm and

20 cm, when the wavelengths of undulations are 10 km and

100 km, respectively.

In a local area or nationwide, a high-resolution and accu-

rate geoid model may be derived. The GEOID99 model is the

latest one for the United States. The geoid grid with a cell

size of 1 arcminute (about 2 km) is known as a hybrid geoid

model, combining many millions of gravity and elevation points

with thousands of control points (i.e., GPS ellipsoid heights

on leveled bench marks). For the conterminous United States,

when comparing the GEOID99 model back to the same control

points, the rms difference is 4.6 cm. Its resolution may be be-

tween 10 and 20 km (Smith and Roman, 2001). For most of geo-

physical exploration purposes, simple height conversions with

GEOID99 in the conterminous United States can be sufficient.

CORRECTLY INTERPRETING THE FREE-AIR REDUCTION

Heiskanen and Moritz (1967, chapter 8) defined physical

geodesy to be “classical” or “conventional” before M. S. Molo-

densky proposed his famous theory in the 1940s, and “modern”

thereafter. Distinguished from Stokes’ formula, Molodensky’s

theory says that the physical surface of the Earth can be deter-

mined without using the density required, for example, by the

Bouguer correction. Heiskanen and Moritz (1967, section 8.3

“Molodensky’s Problem”, 293) clearly wrote:

The normal gravity on the telluroid [variant of the

geoid–authors

] is computed from the normal gravity

at the ellipsoid by the normal free-air reduction, but

now applied upward . . . Therefore the new free-air

anomalies have nothing in common with a free-air

reduction of actual gravity to sea level, except the

name. This distinction should be carefully kept in

mind.

And on page 241,



If, as is usually done, the normal free-air gradient

∂γ /∂


h

≈ 0.3086 mGal/m is used for the free-air re-

duction, then the free-air anomalies refer, strictly

speaking, to the Earth’s physical surface (to ground

level) rather than to the geoid (to sea level) . . . How-

ever, this distinction is insignificant and can be ig-

nored in most cases, so that we may consider as

sea-level anomalies.

In geodesy, this distinction is insignificant and can be ig-

nored in most cases because the reduction (downward contin-

uation) to sea level affects relatively short-wavelength anoma-

lies, which are less significant in determination of the geoid. The

geoid reflects very-long-wavelength density variations. This is

particularly true in a determination of regional or global geoid

undulations. But in exploration geophysics, we are interested

just in short-wavelength anomalies. The distinction is impor-

tant for us. Furthermore, it has led to an astonishing level of

confusion among geophysicists.

In exploration geophysics, Naudy and Neumann (1965) ex-

plicitly noted that the free-air and Bouguer gravity anoma-

lies refer to the observation station. Many algorithms [e.g., the

equivalent source technique of Dampney (1969)] have been

developed to continue gravity from an undulating observation

surface to a horizontal plane. Regardless, even in the 1980s,

some publications still referred the free-air anomaly to sea level

and incorrectly suggested that the measured vertical gravity

gradient should be better used to reduce observed gravity to

sea level. For example, Gumert (1985) wrote, “The free-air fac-

tor varies significantly with horizontal position and can affect

the reduction of observed gravity data. Land gravity measure-

ments made at varying elevation in an area of rugged topog-

raphy, processed using the standard accepted free-air factor,

can produce highly erroneous maps.” Again, “Airborne grav-

ity gives the ability to fly multi-level lines in a survey area to

compute the free-air factor to apply to the data.”

The height (or improperly, “free-air”) correction should be

made using a consistent, worldwide theoretical standard, that

is, one defined by an ellipsoid. The use of local or measured

value is inconsistent with the objective of looking for anomalies

relative to a universal model of the earth’s gravity and is unable

to continue observed gravity to any common level.

SATELLITE ALTIMETER GRAVITY: AN EXAMPLE

OF CONVERTING GEOID INTO GRAVITY

The primary task of geodesy is to determine the geoid from

the observed gravity. However, we can go in the other direc-

tion, as well: we can convert the observed geoid into a grav-

ity anomaly. Satellite altimeter gravity (also called satellite-

derived gravity) is such a process.

In satellite altimetry, two very precise distance measure-

ments are made so that the topography of the ocean surface

(i.e., the geoid) is derived. First, the ellipsoid height is mea-

sured by tracking the satellite from a globally distributed net-

work of lasers and/or Doppler stations. Second, the height of

the satellite above the closest ocean surface (i.e., the eleva-

tion H) is measured with a microwave radar altimeter. As

demonstrated in equation (1), the difference between these

two heights is just the geoid undulation N. In practice, altimeter

data, collected by different satellites over many years, are com-

bined to achieve a high data density and to average out sea sur-

face disturbing factors such as waves, winds, tides, and currents.

The geoid relatively reflects deeply buried density variations.

In order to enhance small-scale features, the high-precision

geoid is converted into gravity anomaly. The gravity anomaly

can be computed by using inverse Stokes’ formula (the geoid-

to-gravity method) or by taking the derivatives of the geoid and

using Laplace’s equation (the slope-to-gravity method; e.g., see

Sandwell and Smith, 1997). In the real world, the conversion



1666

Li and G ¨otze

algorithms are sophisticated, based on laws of physics, geome-

try, and statistics.

Anyway, there is a simple relationship between gravity

anomaly and geoid undulation. For two-dimensional anoma-

lies, an anomaly in geoid with a wavelength λ and amplitude



, the associated gravity anomaly

is given by

g

=

2πγ N



λ

,

(11)



where γ = 980 000 mGal, the average gravity of the Earth. This

formula can be derived in the Fourier domain by following

the work of a determination of gravity anomalies from a grid

of geoid undulations (Haxby et al., 1983). Equation (11) says

that the bump in the geoid associated with a 10-mGal gravity

anomaly and a wavelength of 10 km is just 16 mm. This indi-

cates how precise the geoid must be in order to derive gravity

anomalies useful for exploration geophysics. A number of in-

dependent studies (Green et al., 1998; Yale et al., 1998) show

that satellite altimeter gravity has an accuracy of about 5 mGal

and resolution of about 20 km.

GEOPHYSICS: STATION GRAVITY ANOMALY RELATIVE

TO THE ELLIPSOID

Equations (4) and (9) appear to be the same. Actually, they

have two important differences. First, in equation (4) is the

ellipsoid height, but in equation (9) the elevation. Second,

equation (4) accounts for the change of theoretical gravity

due to the ellipsoid with the ellipsoid height, whereas equa-

tion (9) represents an historical endeavor of reducing gravity

from the Earth’s surface to the geoid. These two differences [i.e.,

equations

(4) and (9)] distinguish geophysics from (classical)

geodesy.

In geophysics, we should follow equation (4) and its

implications.

Gravity anomaly is a station anomaly

The geophysical use of gravity is to learn about the Earth’s

interior. We need to remove the effects of the Earth’s irregular

(nonellipsoidal) surface. In principle, this means that we should

compare the observed gravity to that of ellipsoidally-produced

theoretical gravity values at each observation station. Their

difference is just the gravity anomaly. The free-air anomaly is

the difference between the observed gravity, without terrain-

related corrections, and the theoretical gravity. The complete

Bouguer anomaly is the difference between the observed grav-

ity with the complete Bouguer correction (the Bouguer slab,

curvature, and terrain corrections) and the theoretical gravity.

Both the free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies are located at

the gravity station. We must conduct a continuation process in

order to obtain the gravity responses on the geoid or another

surface/level. As an example, in a continuation to sea level of

the ground Bouguer gravity anomaly in the Central Andes, the

correction value can reach 30% of the maximum magnitude of

the station anomalies (Li and G ¨otze, 1996).

The ellipsoid height, or the elevation plus the geoid

In geophysics, the gravity anomaly is the difference be-

tween the observed gravity and the theoretical gravity pro-

duced by the ellipsoid. The geophysical gravity anomaly can

be calculated simply by using the ellipsoid height instead

of the elevation in positioning and in all necessary correc-

tions/reductions. In particular, it is not appropriate to estimate

the elevation from the ellipsoid height determined by GPS and

then use the elevation for corrections/reductions. The extra

step produces less reasonable and less significant results.

Traditionally, geophysicists use the elevation as the vertical

position of the gravity station and the topographic model. The

elevation is used in all the corrections including the height cor-

rection and the complete Bouguer correction (the Bouguer

slab, curvature, and terrain corrections). Rigorously speaking,

in addition we should correct observed gravity for the geoid

shape. The gravity effects due to the geoid undulations are

called the indirect effects (Chapman and Bordine, 1979). Li

and G ¨otze (1996) explained the details of estimating the indi-

rect effects. For example, the indirect effect δg



i h

caused by the

routine height correction is

δ

g



i h

= −0.3086mGal.

(12)

Thus, the indirect effect on the free-air gravity anomaly can be



up to 30 mGal worldwide.

However, the amplitude of geoid undulations with a wave-

length below 10 km is usually smaller than 10 cm, and the

amplitude for a wavelength of 100 km is widely smaller than

1 m. Approximately, an elevation change of 10 cm results in a

change in computed Bouguer anomaly value of 0.02 mGal, and

1 m results in a change of 0.2 mGal. In practice, at short wave-

lengths (say, less than 100 km), we don’t need to correct for the

geoid undulations because the geoid is very smooth, with little

power at those wavelengths. In petroleum exploration and in

particular in minerals exploration, by ignoring the geoid cor-

rections (i.e., the indirect effects) one is unlikely to introduce

any important relative errors across the region of investigation.

Use of geoid, gravity, and gravity gradient

The geoid undulations, gravity anomalies, and gravity gradi-

ent changes all are due to the density variations of the Earth’s

interior, and are transformable from one to another. The wave-

lengths that the gravity gradient, gravity, and geoid dominate

or concentrate range gradually from short (tens of meters) to

long (thousands of kilometers). The geoid undulations are used

to study the global or very regional problems such as the man-

tle convection. On the contrary, the gravity gradient is better

used to investigate short wavelength effects for engineering,

environmental, or mining problems.

SUMMARY

Geodesy uses gravity to determine the geoid. Geodesists



must reduce the observed gravity from the actual surface of

the Earth to the geoid (mean sea level). In the gravity cor-

rections/reductions, geodesists use the elevation instead of the

ellipsoid height.

Geophysics uses gravity to study the Earth’s interior. The

gravity anomaly is the difference between the observed gravity

and the theoretical gravity predicted from the ellipsoid. The

gravity anomaly is located at the observation station after the

height correction and other routine corrections/reductions are

applied. In principle, the ellipsoid height should be used in

positioning and in all data corrections/reductions. In practice

and in minerals and petroleum exploration, use of the elevation

rather than the ellipsoid height hardly introduces significant

errors because the geoid is very smooth. However, it should




Correctly Understanding Gravity

1667

not be recommended as a routine procedure to derive the ele-

vation from the ellipsoid height determined by GPS and then

use the elevation for corrections/reductions.

The theoretical gravity on, above, and below the ellipsoid

surface can be calculated by a closed-form formula. Its approx-

imation by the International Gravity Formula and the height

correction including the second-order terms is typically accu-

rate enough worldwide.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A part of this work was finished when X.L. worked as a re-

search fellow at Freie Universit¨at Berlin, financially supported

by the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung. Writing of this tuto-

rial has been largely stimulated by the discussions at the gravity

and magnetic user group grvmag-l during May and June 2000.

Comments from and discussions with Richard O. Hansen and

Maurice D. Craig were helpful in improving the tutorial. We

also thank associate editor David A. Chapin and reviewers

Alan T. Herring and Dhananjay N. Ravat for their valuable

suggestions and comments.

REFERENCES

Chapman, M. E., and Bordine, J. H., 1979, Considerations of the indi-

rect effect in marine gravity modeling: J. Geophys. Res.,

84, 3889–

3892.

Dampney, C. N. G., 1969, The equivalent source technique: Geophysics,



34, 39–53.

Eckhardt, E. A., 1940, A brief history of the gravity method of prospect-

ing for oil: Geophysics,

5, 231–242.

Green, C. M., Fairhead, J. D., and Maus, S., 1998, Satellite-derived gra-

vity: Where we are and what’s next: The Leading Edge,

17, 77–79.

Gumert, W. R., 1985, Advantages of continuous profiling airborne

gravity surveys: Proceedings of the International Meeting on Po-

tential Fields in Rugged Topography, Institut de G´eophysique, Uni-

versit´e de Lausanne, 16–18.

Haxby, W. F., Karner, G. D., LaBrecque, J. L., and Weissel, J. K.,

1983, Digital images of combined oceanic and continental data sets

and their use in tectonic studies: EOS,

64, 995–1004.

Heiskanen, W. A., and Moritz, H., 1967, Physical geodesy: W. H.

Freeman and Co.

Jekeli, C., 1978, An investigation of two models for the degree variances

of global covariance functions: Ohio State University, Department

of Geodetic Science and Surveying, Report 275.

Kaula, W. M., 1966, Theory of satellite geodesy: Blaisdell Publishing

Co.


Lakshmanan, J., 1991, The generalized gravity anomaly: Endoscopic

microgravity: Geophysics,

56, 712–723.

Lemoine, F. G., et al., 1998, The development of the joint NASA GSFC

and National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) geopotential

model EGM96: Technical Paper NASA/TP-1998-206861.

Li, X., and G ¨otze, H.-J, 1996, Effects of topography and geoid on grav-

ity anomalies in mountainous areas: The Central Andes as an ex-

ample: Institut f ¨ur Geologie, Geophysik und Geoinformatik, Freie

Universit¨at Berlin.

Moritz, H., 1980, Geodetic Reference System 1980: Bulletin

G´eod´esique,

54, 395–405.

National Imagery and Mapping Agency, 2000, Department of Defense

World Geodetic System 1984: Its definition and relationship with

local geodetic systems: Technical Report NIMA TR8350.2, Third

Edition.

Naudy, H., and Neumann, R., 1965, Sur la d´efinition de l’anomalie de

Bouguer et sec cons´equences pratiques: Geophy. Prosp.,

13, 1–11.

Nettleton, L. L., 1976, Gravity and magnetics in oil prospecting:

McGraw-Hill Book Co.

Sandwell, D. T., and Smith, W. H. F., 1997, Marine gravity anomaly from

Geosat and ERS-1 satellites: J. Geophys. Res.,

102, 10039–10054.

Smith, D. A., and Roman, D. R., 2001, GEOID99 and G99SSS:

One arc-minute models for the United States: J. Geodesy, in

press.


Tscherning, C. C., and Rapp, R. H., 1974, Closed covariance expres-

sion for gravity anomalies, geoid undulations, and deflections of the

vertical implied by anomaly degree variance models: Ohio State

University, Department of Geodetic Science and Surveying, Report

208.

Wahr, J., 1997, Geodesy and gravity: Class notes: Samizdat Press.



Woollard, G. P., 1979, The new gravity system—Changes in interna-

tional gravity base values and anomaly values: Geophysics,

44, 1352–

1366.


Yale, M. M., Sandwell, D. T., and Herring, A. T., 1998, What are the

limitations of satellite altimetry?: The Leading Edge,

17, 73–76.

APPENDIX A

THEORETICAL GRAVITY DUE TO AN ELLIPSOID

The theoretical gravity is the gravity effect due to an equipo-

tential ellipsoid of revolution. Approximate formulas are used

widely. In fact, we can calculate the theoretical gravity at any

position on, above, or below the ellipsoid surface using closed-

form expressions.

Closed-form expression: Gravity on the surface of the ellipsoid

The theoretical gravity on the surface of the ellipsoid is given

by the formula of Somigliana (Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967, 76):

γ

= γ



e

1 + sin

2

φ

1 − e



2

sin


2

φ

,



(A-1)

where


k

=

bγ



p

aγ

e

− 1;


e

=

a

2

− b



2

a

2

is the first eccentricity



;

and and are the semimajor and semiminor axes of the ellip-

soid, respectively; γ

e

and γ


p

are the theoretical gravity at the

equator and poles, respectively; and φ is the geodetic latitude.

Closed-form formula: Gravity above and below the surface of

the ellipsoid

The theoretical gravity at any ellipsoid height and

any geodetic latitude φ (Figure A-1) can also be given by a

closed-form formula. Starting from the general formula of

Heiskanen and Moritz (1967, 67–71), Lakshmanan (1991) de-

rived the formula and published a result containing typo-

graphic errors. Li and G ¨otze (1996) repeated the derivation

and corrected the errors, obtaining

γ

=

1



W

G M

b

2

E



2

+

ω



2

a

2

Eq

(b

2

E



2

)q

0

1

2



sin

2

β



1

6



− ω

2

cos

2

β

,



(A-2)


1668

Li and G ¨otze

where


E

a

2

− b



2

is linear eccentricity,



W

=

b

2

E



2

sin


2

β

b

2

E



2

,

q

= 3 1 +

b

2

E

2

1 −


b

E

tan


−1

E

b

− 1,


q

0

=



1

2

1 +



3b

2

E

2

tan


−1

E

b

3b



E

,

b

r

2

− E



2

cos


2

β ,


cos β =

1

2 +



R

2 −


1

4 +


R

2

4 −



D

2

,



F

IG

. A-1. A station above an ellipsoid surface. The ellipsoid



has the semimajor axis and semiminor axis b. The position of

station P relative to the ellipsoid is defined by ellipsoid height



and geodetic latitude φ. The angle β is called the reduced

latitude.

and r

2

/



E

2

d



2

/

E

2

r



2

r

2

z



2

d

2

r



2

− z

2

=



cos β

cos φ, sin β + sin φ, and tan β = b/tan φ.

Approximate formula for the latitude correction

The conventional latitude correction is a second-order series

expansion of equation (A-1) (Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967, 77):

γ

= γ



e

1 + f

sin


2

φ



1

4

f

4

sin


2

2φ ,


(A-3)

with


f

=



γ

p

− γ


e

γ

e

(gravity flattening),

f

4

= −



1

2

f

2

+

5



2

f m,

f

=

a

− b

a

(flattening of the ellipsoid),

and

m

=

ω



2

a

2

b



G M

.

Approximate formula for the height correction



The height correction accounts for the change of theoret-

ical gravity due to the station being located above or below

the ellipsoid at ellipsoid height h. As a second approximation

(Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967, 79), a Taylor series expansion

for the theoretical gravity above the ellipsoid with a positive

direction downward along the geodetic normal to the reference

ellipsoid is

γ

h

= γ 1 −

2

a



(1 + − 2 sin

2

φ



+

3

a

2

h

2

.



The difference γ

h

− γ (i.e., the height correction) is

γ

h

− γ = −




e

a

1 + +

5

2

m



− 3 sin

2

φ



h

+



e

a

2

h

2

.

(A-4)



See ERRATA for this  Figure


Errata

997


To: “Ellipsoid, geoid, gravity, geodesy, and geophysics,” X. Li and H. -J. Götze (Geophysics, 66, 1660-1668).

The authors thank Dr. Nico Sneeuw of the University of

Calgary for pointing out a graphical error. The reduced lati-

tude


β was incorrectly defined in Figure A-1, which should

be  replaced  by  the  figure  shown  below.  However,  this

graphical error was not introduced into the derivation of the

closed-form expression for the theoretical gravity due to an

ellipsoid. All the formulae given in Appendix A are correct.

There  is  also  a  typographic  error  in  the  dynamic  form

factor J

2

, in the first paragraph on page 1662.



J

2

= 108 263 x 10



-8

not 108 263 x 10

8

.

Figure A-1. A station above a reference ellipsoid surface. The reference ellipsoid has a semi-major axis a and a semi-minor



axis b. The position of station P relative to the reference ellipsoid is defined by ellipsoid height h and geodetic latitude 

φ. The


ellipsoid through point P has the same linear eccentricity as the reference ellipsoid. The reduced latitude 

β is a geocentric lat-

itude of point Q, which is the vertically projected point, on a sphere of radius a, of station P’s normal projection on the refer-

ence ellipsoid surface.



GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 67, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2002); DOI 10.1190/1.1489656 031203GPY


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə