The deep-level assumptions, values, and commitments in terms of which people govern their lives



Yüklə 8,89 Mb.
tarix05.10.2018
ölçüsü8,89 Mb.
#72402


Worldview is “the deep-level assumptions, values, and commitments in terms of which people govern their lives.” Charles H. Kraft, Communication Theory for Christian Witness, Rev. ed. (Maryknoll: Orbis, 1991), 161.

  • Worldview is “the deep-level assumptions, values, and commitments in terms of which people govern their lives.” Charles H. Kraft, Communication Theory for Christian Witness, Rev. ed. (Maryknoll: Orbis, 1991), 161.
















[Honne is] an opinion or an action motivated by one’s true inner feelings and [tatemae is] an opinion or an action influenced by social norms. These two words are often considered a dichotomy contrasting genuinely-held personal feeling and opinions from those that are socially controlled. Nobuyuki Honna and Bates Hoffer, An English Dictionary of Japanese Culture (Tokyo: Yuhikaku, 1986), 94.

  • [Honne is] an opinion or an action motivated by one’s true inner feelings and [tatemae is] an opinion or an action influenced by social norms. These two words are often considered a dichotomy contrasting genuinely-held personal feeling and opinions from those that are socially controlled. Nobuyuki Honna and Bates Hoffer, An English Dictionary of Japanese Culture (Tokyo: Yuhikaku, 1986), 94.



Honne is one’s deep motive or intention, while tatemae refers to motives or intentions that are socially tuned, those that are shaped, encouraged, or suppressed by majority norms....[H]onne and tatemae are not actually opposites as these two values are relative to people and situations. Nobuyuki Honna and Bates Hoffer, An English Dictionary of Japanese Culture (Tokyo: Yuhikaku, 1986), 94.

  • Honne is one’s deep motive or intention, while tatemae refers to motives or intentions that are socially tuned, those that are shaped, encouraged, or suppressed by majority norms....[H]onne and tatemae are not actually opposites as these two values are relative to people and situations. Nobuyuki Honna and Bates Hoffer, An English Dictionary of Japanese Culture (Tokyo: Yuhikaku, 1986), 94.













The man and his wife were both naked, and they felt no shame.

  • The man and his wife were both naked, and they felt no shame.



Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.

  • Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.



Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the LORD God among the trees of the garden.

  • Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the LORD God among the trees of the garden.



But the LORD God called to the man, "Where are you?"

  • But the LORD God called to the man, "Where are you?"

  • He answered, "I heard you in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid."



…the term guilt and its various derivatives occur 145 times in the Old Testament and 10 times in the New Testament, whereas the term shame and its derivatives occur nearly 300 times in the Old Testament and 45 times in the New Testament.

  • …the term guilt and its various derivatives occur 145 times in the Old Testament and 10 times in the New Testament, whereas the term shame and its derivatives occur nearly 300 times in the Old Testament and 45 times in the New Testament.

  • Timothy C. Tennent, Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2007), 213.



focuses on the person

  • focuses on the person



I did something bad or wrong.”

  • I did something bad or wrong.”





“desire to hide, escape, or strike back”

  • “desire to hide, escape, or strike back”



Concern with others’ evaluation of self

  • Concern with others’ evaluation of self



Love gets rid of shame.

  • Love gets rid of shame.







Five Metaphors For Jesus Saving Effect:

    • Five Metaphors For Jesus Saving Effect:
    • “the court of law (e.g., justification),
    • the world of commerce (e.g., redemption),
    • personal relationship (e.g., reconciliation),
    • worship (e.g., sacrifice), and
    • the battleground (e.g., triumph over evil).”
  • Joel Green & Mark Baker, Recovering the Scandal of the Cross (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2000), 23.








Yüklə 8,89 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə