Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə110/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114

Annotation
38: (p. 218) ‘He was not
266
obliged to recognize any judge other
than God’: The rabbis claim that what is commonly called the Great San-
hedrin
56
was instituted by Moses, and not merely the rabbis but also the
majority of Christians, who are as absurd about this as the rabbis. Moses
did indeed select for himself seventy associates to share the cares of gov-
ernment with him, since he could not carry the burden of the whole people
by himself. However, he never issued a decree setting up a Council of
Seventy. On the contrary, he issued orders that each tribe should appoint
judges in the cities which God had given him, to settle disputes in accor-
dance with the laws he had made,
57
and if the judges themselves should be
in doubt concerning the law, that they should consult the High Priest (who
was thus the supreme interpreter of the laws) or the [superior] judge to
whom they were subordinate at the time (who had the right of consulting
the High Priest), in order to settle the dispute in accordance with the High
Priest’s interpretation.
If it happened that a subordinate
58
judge claimed not to be bound to
give his verdict according to the High Priest’s decision whether received
from him or from his sovereign, he was sentenced to death by the supreme
judge in o⁄ce at the time, through
267
whom the subordinate judge had been
appointed: see Deuteronomy
17.9. This might be either someone like
Joshua, the supreme commander of the whole people of Israel or it might
be a leader of one of the tribes, who, after the division into tribes, had the
right of consulting the priest about the a¡airs of his tribe, of deciding
about war and peace, of fortifying cities, of appointing judges,
59
etc.
Alternatively, it might be a king to whom all or some of the tribes had
transferred their right.
I could o¡er a good many instances from history to con¢rm all this, but
I will mention just one which seems a particularly striking instance.When
the prophet of Shiloh chose Jeroboam as king, by that very fact he gave
him the right of consulting the High Priest and of appointing judges, and
and instructed him, because they fail to notice that this turn of phrase is very common among the
Hebrews when declaring the election of a prince legitimate and con¢rming him in his charge. It is
thus that Jethro speaks when counselling Moses to choose associates to help him judge the people,
‘‘if you do this,’’ he says,‘‘then God will command you’’, as if he were saying that his authority will
be sound, and that he will be able to maintain himself in power, on which see Exodus
18.23, 25.30, 1
Samuel
13.15, 25.30, and especially Joshua 1.9, where God says to him,‘‘haveI not commandedyou,
have courage, and show yourself a man of heart’’, as if God were saying to him,‘‘is it not I who have
made you leader? Do not be afraid then of anything, for I will be with you everywhere’’.’
56
‘The great gathering’ [in Dutch].
57
‘And punish law-breakers’ [in French].
58
‘The lesser’ [in Dutch].
59
‘In his own towns, which were subject only to him’ [in French].
Annotations
274


Je ro b o am o btain e d all and eve r y r igh t ove r the te n tr ib e s that Reho b o am
re t ain e d ove r the two tr ib e s. Je ro b o am c ould the refore app oin t a supre me
c ou nc il in his palace with the s ame r igh t by which Jeho shaphat had don e
s o at Je r us ale m (s e e 
2 C hronicles 19 .8¡.). For, u ndoubte dly, s ince Je ro b o am
wa s king by c o m mand of Go d, n e ithe r he nor his subje cts we re o blige d by
the law of Mo s e s to sub mit to Reho b o am a s judge s ince they we re not
Reho b o am’s subjects. Eve n le s s we re they o blige d to sub mit to the c ou r t at
Je r us ale m which had b e e n s e t up by Reho b o am and wa s sub ordinate to
hi m. Since the Heb rew st ate re maine d divide d, the re we re a s many
supreme councils
60
as there were states.Those who do not pay attention to
the di¡erent political arrangements of the Hebrews, at di¡erent times, but
rather imagine them all to be one,
61
thus become entangled in all sorts of
di⁄culties.
[C hapte r 
19
 ]
Annotation
39 (p. 249) ‘or take legal proceedings against him’: Here we
must pay special attention to what we said about right in chapter
16
.
60
‘Di¡erent and independent the one from the other’ [in French].
61
‘As if it was all the same’ [in French].
Annotations
275


Index
Abigail
29
‘above nature’,impossibleconcept
xxxii
,
86
,
87
,
117
Abraham, the Patriarch
18
,
28
,
35
,
35
--
6
,
48
,
120
,
122
,
174
,
262
,
263
Ahab
29
,
36
Alexander the Great
4
,
96
,
149
,
211
,
212
,
221
al-Fakhar, Jehuda (early thirteenth century),
Spanish Jewish opponent of Maimonidean
Arisotelianism
187
--
9
,
187
,
190
Ambrose, Saint (c. ad
339^97), bishop of Milan
238
Amos
31
Amsterdam, commerce
xxx
,
xxxv
,
257
mix of religions
xx
,
112
Portuguese Jewish Synagogue
xxiii
,
xxxix
Apocrypha
110
,
144
,
154
,
169
Apostles
xx
,
10
,
19
,
26
,
41
,
71
,
75
,
112
,
114
,
155
--
62
,
164
,
169
,
172
,
180
,
230
,
244
disagreement and con£ict among
158
,
161
aristocratic republic
xxiv
,
xxix
,
202
Aristotle and Aristotelianism
xxi
,
8
,
18
,
79
,
113
,
173
,
187
,
265
Ark of the covenant
137
,
164
,
165
,
166
,
217
,
267
arts and sciences, see improvement
astrology
30
astronomy
34
atheism
xxii
,
xxxiv
,
27
,
87
Balaam
18
,
50
--
1
Bayle, Pierre (
1647^1706), Huguenot
philosopher
xv
,
xvi
,
xxi
,
xxii
,
xxvi
,
xxvii
,
xxix
,
xxxii
,
xxxiii
,
xxxvii
,
87
Bacon, Sir Francis (
1561^1626), English
philosopher
xiv
,
xv
beliefs irrelevant to piety
177
,
178
,
180
,
181
,
182
,
183
--
4
,
250
Bible exegesis
ix
,
x
,
xi
--
xiii
,
xvii
,
xxxi
,
8
,
9
--
10
,
26
,
97
--
117
,
160
Blount, Charles (
1654^93), English deist
xxxvii
‘Bomberg Bible’ (Venice,
1524^5)
141
Boulainvilliers, Henri, Comte de (
1659^1722),
French Spinozist
xvii
Boyle, Robert (
1627^91), English natural
scientist
xv
,
xvi
,
xxxii
,
xxxvi
Brazil
xxxv
,
5n
Cabbalists
137
Cambridge University
xxxii
Cartesians
xiv
--
xv
,
xix
,
xvii
,
77
,
271
censorship, Dutch
viii
,
xxv
--
xxvi
,
1
,
255
China
xxii
,
44
,
55
--
6
‘Chosen People’ (the ancient Israelites)
xl
,
37
,
43
,
44
,
45
,
46
,
47
,
48
,
49
--
50
,
52
--
4
,
56
,
68
,
88
--
9
Christ
xvi
,
xviii
--
xx
,
19
,
29
,
41
,
63
--
4
,
67
,
69
,
70
,
75
,
79
,
90
,
103
,
156
,
159
,
160
,
161
,
169
,
171
,
177
,
183
,
234
,
243
,
268
,
271
Christianity
xvii
,
xxi
,
7
,
71
,
75
--
6
circumcision
52
,
55
civil strife, and civil war
7
,
8
Collegiants
112
,
xx
,
xxvii
Condillac, 
Etienne Bonnot de (
1715^80), French
philosophe
xxxiii
‘common good’
xxx
,
46
,
47
,
200
,
259
Counter-Remonstrants
xxvi
,
xxvii
,
257
,
258
credulity and superstition, inspired by fear
x
,
xix
,
xxi
,
xxiv
,
xxv
,
xxxvi
,
3
--
5
,
7
,
8
,
10
,
12
,
27
,
98
,
130
,
139
,
162
,
164
,
231
Cromwell, Oliver (
1599^1658), Lord Protector of
England (
1654^8)
xxxvi
,
236
Cudworth, Ralph (
1617^88) English Platonist
thinker
xxxii
276




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə