Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə2/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   114

character of the Hebrew state in the time of Moses, and in the
period after his death before the appointment of the kings; on
its excellence, and on the reasons why this divine state could
perish, and why it could scarcely exist without sedition
208
18 Some political principles are inferred from the Hebrew state
and its history
230
19 Where is shown that authority in sacred matters belongs
wholly to the sovereign powers and that the external cult
of religion must be consistent with the stability of the state if
we wish to obey God rightly
238
20 Where it is shown that in a free state everyone is allowed to
think what they wish and to say what they think
250
Annotations: Spinoza’s supplementary notes to theTheological-Political
Treatise
260
Index
276
Contents
vii


Introduction
Spinoza’s aims
The Theological-Political Treatise (
1670) of Spinoza is not a work of
philosophy in the usual sense of the term. Rather it is a rare and interesting
example of what we might call applied or ‘practical’ philosophy.That is, it is
a work based throughout on a philosophical system which, however, mostly
avoids employing philosophical arguments and which has a practical social
and political more than strictly philosophical purpose, though it was also
intended in part as a device for subtly defending and promoting Spinoza’s
own theories. Relatively neglected in recent times, and banned and actively
suppressed in its own time, it is also one of the most profoundly in£uential
philosophical texts in the history of western thought, having exerted an
immense impact on thinkers and writers from the late seventeenth
century throughout the age of the Enlightenment down to the late
nineteenth century.
Spinoza’s most immediate aim in writing this text was to strengthen
individual freedom and widen liberty of thought in Dutch society, in
particular by weakening ecclesiastical authority and lowering the status of
theology. In his opinion, it was these forces which were chie£y responsible
for fomenting religious tensions and hatred, inciting political sedition
among the common people, and enforcing damaging intellectual
censorship on unconventional thinkers like himself. He tried to lessen
ecclesiastical power and the prestige of theology as he himself encountered
these in the Dutch Republic ^ or, as it was then more commonly known,
the United Provinces ^ partly as a way of opening a path for himself and
those who sympathized with his ideas, or thought in similar ways, to
viii


propagate their views among contemporaries freely both verbally and in
writing. But still more he did so in the hope, and even expectation, of
helping by this means to build a freer and more stable society.
His strategy for establishing and reinforcing toleration and freedom of
thought, as he himself explains in his preface, relies in the ¢rst place on
exposing what he judges to be the basic causes of theological prejudice,
confessional rivalry, intolerance, and intellectual censorship as they plagued
the Europe (and America) of his time. He sought to show that conventional ^
and o⁄cially approved ^ religious teaching and dogmas are based mostly on
mistaken notions, indeed profound misconceptions about the character of
Scripture itself. In this way, he attempted to expose what he saw as a near
universal and dangerous ignorance about such matters as prophecy,
miracles, piety and the true nature of divine commandments and revelation.
Especially useful for undermining the power of theology and lessening
respect for theologically based structures of authority and tradition, he
thought, was his method of demonstrating that ‘prophecy’ is not divine
inspiration in the way that most people then believed, and is not the work of
divine wisdom in action, but is rather a consequence of certain individuals
being endowed with a particularly powerful ‘imagination’.
The Theological-Political Treatise o¡ers a comprehensive theory of what
religion is and how ecclesiastical authority and theological concepts exercise
their power over men while, at the same time, providing a new method of
Bible exegesis. But Spinoza’s challenge in this anonymously published book
was not only to contemporary views about Scripture, faith, piety, priestly
authority and text criticism. In the second place, but no less importantly, he
also strove to reinforce individual liberty and freedom of expression by
introducing, or rather further systematizing, a new type of political theory
(albeit one strongly in£uenced by Machiavelli and Hobbes). This was a
distinctively urban, egalitarian and commercial type of republicanism which
Spinoza mobilized as a vehicle for challenging then accepted ideas about the
nature of society and what the state is for.
To Spinoza, a thinker who grew up in the closing stages of theThirtyYears
War ^ a ruthless and vastly destructive struggle between the European states
only ostensibly about religion ^ changing prevailing ideas about politics and
statecraft seemed no less essential than combating religious prejudice,
intolerance and authoritarianism. What he regarded as fundamentally false
notions about government, public policy, education and morality appeared to
him to threaten and damage not only the lives of individuals but the also fabric
ix
Introduction


of society more generally. It is owing to these defective but strongly prevailing
ideas about politics as well as religion, he argues, that ‘superstition’ is built up
(oftenbyambitious clergy),into a force su⁄ciently potentto overshadow if not
direct all aspects of men’s lives, including intellectual debate and the
administration of ordinary justice. Religious dogma comes to be enforced on
everyone by force of law because the common people are persuaded by
religious teachers that they should insist on doctrinal uniformity in the
interests of their own and everyone else’s salvation and relationship to God.
Religion is concocted into a powerful force in human a¡airs, he argues, chie£y
by means of dogmatic appeals to Scripture, though also ‘with pomp and
ceremony, so that everyone would ¢nd it more impressive than anything else
and observe it zealously with the highest degree of ¢delity’.
1
A correct
understanding of the mechanics by which all this happens,based on a realistic
analysis of human drives and needs, he contends, will not just help ground a
solid toleration and reduce inter-confessional strife but also diminish internal
ideological threats to legitimate government and generally render the
individual happier and society more peaceful and stable.
Spinoza’s method
Although a particular system of philosophy inspired and underpins the
whole of the Theological-Political Treatise, it does so in most of the chapters
unobtrusively and frequently in a hidden fashion.While his revolutionary
metaphysics, epistemology and moral philosophy subtly infuse every
part and aspect of his argumentation, the tools which Spinoza more
conspicuously brings to his task are exegetical, philological and historical.
In fact, it is the latter features rather than the underlying philosophy to
which scholars chie£y call attention when discussing this particular text.
Spinoza’s hermeneutical methodology constitutes a historically rather
decisive step forward in the evolution not just of Bible criticism as such but
of hermeneutics more generally, for he contends that reconstructing the
historical context and especially the belief system of a given era is always
the essential ¢rst and most important step to a correct understanding of
any text. In this respect his approach was starkly di¡erent from that of
traditional exegetes of Scripture and from Renaissance text criticism as a
whole (as well as from that of our contemporary postmodernist criticism).
1
Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, Preface, para.
6.
x
Introduction




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə