Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə8/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   114

churches in his view are not upright, praiseworthy and justi¢ed religious
institutions but rather debased and corrupt bodies in which what he
considers to be the church’s true function, namely to instruct the people in
‘justice and charity’, is being continually adulterated and thwarted, not just
by ‘base avarice and ambition’ and use of doctrine to defeat rivals, but also
by exploiting popular ignorance and credulity to intimidate, marginalize
and condemn freethinking individuals. Hence,‘faith amounts to nothing
more than credulity and prejudices’, something which degrades human
reason completely inhibiting men’s free judgment and capacity to
distinguish true from false, a system of theological doctrines apparently
‘designed altogether to extinguish the light of the intellect’.
27
Where a republic, whether democratic or aristocratic, or any monarchy
permits an organized clergy to evolve distinct from the ruling elite, from
the o⁄ce-holders of the state, and preside over the publicly proclaimed
religion, the ‘multitude’, admonishes Spinoza, will always consider the
clergy and its leaders an alternative, and higher, source of authority than
the secular government, believing, as they do, that ecclesiastics are closest
to God. Churchmen, as is only to be expected, will then devise more and
more dogmas and rulings further to enhance their power and subordinate
secular authority to their judgment and approval. Hence, a vital safeguard
for preserving liberty in any republic, argues Spinoza, is to prevent the
factions that form among the ruling oligarchy, and the o⁄ce-holders, from
dividing into competing sects or churches supporting rival priesthoods
and schools of doctrine. The more o⁄ce-holders seek the approval and
support of ecclesiastics in their battles with other political factions, the
more they must defer to theologians, and hence the more they will become
helpless prey to ‘superstition’, Spinoza’s shorthand for subservience to
theology and ecclesiastical control. In such cases, he maintains, adherents
of religious congregations and doctrines condemned by the dominant
priesthood are ruthlessly sacri¢ced not, he insists, for the public good but
solely ‘to the hatred and cruelty of their enemies’.
28
Freedom of religion, then, as distinct from freedom to expand
ecclesiastical authority, wealth and in£uence, is accommodated within
Spinoza’s scheme but remains secondary to freedom of thought and tied to
restrictions on priestly independence and the authority of churches over
their members. Freedom to embrace a particular faith, practise the
27
Ibid., para.
9.
28
Ibid., para.
7.
xxiv
Introduction


observances it prescribes, and profess its doctrines, not only should be
respected but is politically useful where well managed, albeit only when
accompanied by robust safeguards against religious zeal and intolerance.
Preventing the growth of a separate and powerful public priesthood is a
prerequisite, in Spinoza’s opinion, for a free republic because the outward
forms of religion and religious authority fundamentally a¡ect the
cohesion, stability and orderliness of the state as well as individual liberty
and freedom of thought. Where ecclesiastical authority is permitted to
follow an independent line, the masses will inexorably become estranged
from their government the moment it tries to uphold freedom of thought,
expression and the press against the church hierarchy, the ignorant
inevitably rushing to assist those who thirst for power over others ‘so that
slavery may return once more’, as Spinoza characteristically puts it, and
‘superstition’ again reign supreme. Having himself witnessed the street
riots, and the murder of the Brothers De Witt, in The Hague, in
1672,
29
he
knew at ¢rst hand the disastrous consequences of enabling ministers of
religion to denounce o⁄ce-holders of the state with a view to in£aming the
ignorant and credulous against government policies by proclaiming these
ungodly and heretical.
It is not then religious toleration, for Spinoza, but freedom of thought
and expression which principally safeguard individual liberty under the
state, constituting the most precious possession not just of the wise but of
those who are genuinely ‘religious’. Unfortunately, he argues, this essential
point is very rarely grasped in society. To regulate men’s thoughts, beliefs
and judgments may be impossible, but in his time, as subsequently, it was
generally not deemed appropriate for individuals to form their own views,
freely and independently, as to what is true and what is not, what is morally
right and what is not, and what is just. Rather governments, churches and
educational institutions took it for granted that individuals have no right to
decide the most fundamental questions of conviction for themselves and
that what is proper for them to believe should be enforced and what is
incompatible therewith suppressed. Among the various censorship laws,
anti-heresy statutes and decrees of religious uniformity applying in
Europe in his day, those with which Spinoza himself had most directly to
29
Johan de Witt (
1625^72) was ‘Pensionary’ or chief minister of the States of Holland and the
presiding ¢gure in Dutch politics between
1653 and 1672; he and his brother Cornelis, also a
high o⁄ce-holder of the state, incurred the hostility of the strict Calvinist clergy through their
policy of religious toleration and general opposition to hard-line Calvinist attitudes.
xxv
Introduction




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə