Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə9/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   114

deal were the Dutch anti-Socinian laws of
1653, a code designed not just to
curb Socinianism but to serve as a tool of theological censorship more
generally. It was under these decrees, for instance, that the books of
Spinoza’s friends and allies, Lodewijk Meyer and Adriaan Koerbagh
(
1632^69) as well as the Dutch version of Hobbes’ Leviathan were all
suppressed.
For Spinoza, book censorship posed a formidable problem. Indeed, the
question of whether, when, and how to publish his own writings dogged
him in his later years on an almost daily basis.There was also a wider pall of
disapproval and condemnation hanging over him (he was formally placed
under surveillance by the Reformed Church council of The Hague, in
1675), so that, by the early and mid 1670s, he had some reason to feel
anxious and insecure. The famous reference in the preface of his
Theological-Political Treatise to his co-citizens and himself enjoying the
‘rare happiness of living in a republic where everyone’s judgment is free
and unshackled, where each may worship God as his conscience dictates
and where freedom is esteemed above all things dear and precious’ was
undoubtedly tactful but it was also more than a touch sarcastic and was
probably also designed to prod his readers in a particular direction by
hinting that, with its current laws, the Dutch Republic was not living up to
the true ideals of its founders.
A key aim of Spinoza’s toleration doctrine, in any case, was to establish
the desirability of freedom to publish one’s views no matter how decried
they might be by theologians and by the majority. No other Early
Enlightenment theory of toleration, certainly not those of Locke or Le
Clerc, or even that of Bayle, seeks to clear a comparably broad path for
liberty of the press. For Spinoza, the principle that society may rightly
demand of the individual submission with respect to actions but not with
regard to his or her desires, thoughts, opinions and conversation, meant
that men should also be free to express their views in print. All e¡orts to
curb expression of opinion, and freedom to write and publish, he insists,
not only subvert the sphere of legitimate freedom but spell constant
danger of instability for the state. The bitter strife between Remonstrants
and Counter-Remonstrants in the United Provinces and the overthrow of
the Advocate of Holland, Johan van Oldenbarnevelt (
1547^1619),
30
in
30
The Remonstrants were the more tolerant and liberal, and the Counter-Remonstrants the strict
Calvinist, faction of the Dutch Reformed Church during the early seventeenth century; the regime
of Oldenbarnevelt strongly supported the former against the latter but was overthrown, in
1618, by
xxvi
Introduction


1618, he contends, su⁄ciently proves that in times of spiritual turmoil
the ‘real schismatics are those who condemn other men’s books and
subversively instigate the insolent mob against their authors, rather than
the authors themselves, who for the most part write only for the learned
and consider reason alone as their ally. Hence, the real agitaters are those
who attempt to do away with freedom of judgement in a free republic ^ a
freedom which cannot be suppressed.’
31
Spinoza and the rise of modern democratic republicanism
Another crucially important aspect of theTheological-Political Treatise is its
advocacy of democracy. By thoroughly subordinating freedom of
conscience and worship to individual freedom of thought and expression,
Spinoza, like Bayle, placed his toleration entirely beyond the then pale
of respectability. Aside from a few Collegiants and Socinians, few
contemporaries considered such a concept of individual liberty of thought
and conviction to be in any way compatible with a proper Christian
outlook or ¢tting for a well-ordered society. His doctrine was widely
condemned in the United Provinces as well as elsewhere. Generally, during
the eighteenth century Locke’s toleration was vastly preferred to Spinoza’s
and, in this slightly pejorative sense, it is doubtless true that ‘Locke
provided the theoretical defence of the toleration which would rule the
outlook of the coming age’.
32
However, Locke’s ‘Christian argument’ was
decidedly not that of Bayle, Diderot, Helve
´tius, d’Holbach and the radical
wing of the Enlightenment which was the source of our own ‘modernity’,
although until recently this has seldom been acknowledged. By
prioritizing freedom of the individual, and of expression, in preference to
freedom of worship and religious observance, Spinoza in fact cleared a
much wider space for liberty, and human rights, than did Locke, and cut a
historically more direct, and ultimately more important, path towards
modern western individualism.
Spinoza’s highly unHobbesian rule that the ‘less freedom of judgement
is conceded to men the further their distance from the most natural state,
a coup-d’etat led by the Prince of Orange, Maurice of Nassau (
1567^1625) and backed by the
Counter-Remonstrants; for further details, see Jonathan Israel, The Dutch Republic. Its Rise,
Greatness and Fall.
1477^1806 (Oxford, 1995), pp. 426^57.
31
Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, ch.
20
, para.
15.
32
J. R. Cragg, Church and the Age of Reason,
1648^1789 (1960; Harmondsworth, 1970), p. 80.
xxvii
Introduction


and consequently the more oppressive the regime’,
33
besides ¢rmly
anchoring everyone’s unrestricted right of access to information and ideas
in a free republic, also a¡orded a readily available method for evaluating
any given state. No doubt this highly original perspective arose partly out
of personal needs and preferences, especially Spinoza’s inclination to
judge the worth of any state in terms of whether or not it encourages the
free thinking man’s rational love and understanding of Nature ^ and of
society where the latter is deemed a part of Nature. Nevertheless, as the
twentieth-century British philosopher Stuart Hampshire pointed out,
such an approach, with its stress on promoting learning, freedom of
expression and encouragement to debate, clearly results in practice in a
much wider criterion for judging societies on a purely secular basis than
does the political theory of Hobbes, whose criteria for judging the worth of
states were essentially con¢ned to issues of security and stability.
34
According to Spinoza’s deterministic philosophy, human beings have
the power, and hence the natural right, to do whatever their circumstances,
abilities and environment enable them to do. But of all the di¡erent things
individuals could conceivably do, they will actually do only what they
consider to be ‘best’ for them.The fact that in all spheres of activity people
behave in markedly di¡erent ways despite our all being determined in the
same way is due to the fact that their mostly ‘inadequate’ notions give
people very di¡erent ideas as to what is best for them. It is because the
desires and ideas of each individual, whatever they may want or believe,
serve the same purpose and are determined in the same way, that Spinoza
is able to argue that everyone’s primal desire to be happy in their own way
must be treated as strictly equal in any realistic discussion of society and
politics. On this ground and because of the indispensable role of this
principle of equality in erecting his strictly non-theological moral theory,
Spinoza’s system was from the outset intrinsically linked to the idea that
the democratic form is always the most natural, freest and best kind of
state. Historically, this is something of huge importance, for Spinoza was
actually the ¢rst great philosopher since the rise of philosophy itself, in
ancient Greece, to argue unequivocally, forcefully, and as an intrinsic and
central part of his system that democracy is and must always be the best
form of human organization.
33
Ibid.
34
Stuart Hampshire, Spinoza and Spinozism (Oxford,
2005), p. 138.
xxviii
Introduction




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə