Biogen Inc.; Rule14a-8 no-action letter



Yüklə 0,5 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix03.05.2018
ölçüsü0,5 Mb.
#41068


March 16, 2018 

James Basta 

Biogen Inc. 

james.basta@biogen.com 

Re: 

Biogen Inc. 



Incoming letter dated January 31, 2018 

Dear Mr. Basta: 

This letter is in response to your correspondence dated January 31, 2018 

concerning the shareholder proposal (the “Proposal”) submitted to Biogen Inc. (the 

“Company”) by Azzad Asset Management et al. (the “Proponents”) for inclusion in the 

Company’s proxy materials for its upcoming annual meeting of security holders.  We 

also have received correspondence from the Proponents dated March 2, 2018.  Copies of 

all of the correspondence on which this response is based will be made available on our 

website at http://www.sec.gov/divisions/corpfin/cf-noaction/14a-8.shtml.  For your 

reference, a brief discussion of the Division’s informal procedures regarding shareholder 

proposals is also available at the same website address. 

Sincerely, 

Matt S. McNair 

Senior Special Counsel 

Enclosure 

cc: 


Joshua Brockwell 

Azzad Asset Management 

joshua@azzad.net 



March 16, 2018 

Response of the Office of Chief Counsel 

Division of Corporation Finance 

Re: 


Biogen Inc. 

Incoming letter dated January 31, 2018 

The Proposal urges the compensation committee to report annually on the extent 

to which risks related to public concern over drug pricing strategies are integrated into the 

Company’s incentive compensation policies, plans and programs for senior executives.  

We are unable to conclude that the Company has met its burden of demonstrating 

that it may exclude the Proposal under rule 14a-8(i)(7) as a matter relating to the 

Company’s ordinary business operations.  Accordingly, we do not believe that the 

Company may omit the Proposal from its proxy materials in reliance on rule 14a-8(i)(7). 

We are unable to concur in your view that the Company may exclude the Proposal 

under rule 14a-8(i)(10).  Based on the information you have presented, it does not appear 

that the Company’s public disclosures compare favorably with the guidelines of the 

Proposal.  Accordingly, we do not believe that the Company may omit the Proposal from 

its proxy materials in reliance on rule 14a-8(i)(10). 

Sincerely, 

M. Hughes Bates 

Special Counsel 



DIVISION OF CORPORATION FINANCE 

INFORMAL PROCEDURES REGARDING SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS 

The Division of Corporation Finance believes that its responsibility with respect 

to matters arising under Rule 14a-8 [17 CFR 240.14a-8], as with other matters under the 

proxy rules, is to aid those who must comply with the rule by offering informal advice 

and suggestions and to determine, initially, whether or not it may be appropriate in a 

particular matter to recommend enforcement action to the Commission.  In connection 

with a shareholder proposal under Rule 14a-8, the Division’s staff considers the 

information furnished to it by the company in support of its intention to exclude the 

proposal from the company’s proxy materials, as well as any information furnished by 

the proponent or the proponent’s representative. 

Although Rule 14a-8(k) does not require any communications from shareholders 

to the Commission’s staff, the staff will always consider information concerning alleged 

violations of the statutes and rules administered by the Commission, including arguments 

as to whether or not activities proposed to be taken would violate the statute or rule 

involved.  The receipt by the staff of such information, however, should not be construed 

as changing the staff’s informal procedures and proxy review into a formal or adversarial 

procedure. 

It is important to note that the staff’s no-action responses to Rule 14a-8(j) 

submissions reflect only informal views.  The determinations reached in these no-action 

letters do not and cannot adjudicate the merits of a company’s position with respect to the 

proposal.  Only a court such as a U.S. District Court can decide whether a company is 

obligated to include shareholder proposals in its proxy materials.  Accordingly, a 

discretionary determination not to recommend or take Commission enforcement action 

does not preclude a proponent, or any shareholder of a company, from pursuing any 

rights he or she may have against the company in court, should the company’s 

management omit the proposal from the company’s proxy materials. 




March 2, 2018 

Via 


e-mail at shareholderproposals@sec.gov 

Securities and 

Exchange 

Commission 

Office 

of the 


Chief Counsel 

Division 

of 

Corporation Finance 



100 F 

Street, 


NE 

Washington, DC 

20549 

Re: Request by Biogen Inc. to omit proposal submitted by Azzad Asset Management 

and co-filers 

Ladies and Gentlemen, 

Pursuant 

to 


Rule 

14a-8 


under 

the Securities 

Exchange 

Act of 


1934, Azzad Asset Management 

and 


several co-filers 

(the “Proponents”) submitted a shareholder 

proposal 

(the "Proposal") 

to 

Biogen Inc. (“Biogen” 



or the 

“Company”). 

The Proposal 

asks Biogen’s board to report to 

shareholders on the extent to which risks related to public concerns over drug pricing strategies 

are reflected in senior executive incentive compensation arrangements. 

In a letter to the Division dated January 31, 2018 

(the "No-Action 

Request"), 

Biogen stated 

that 

it intends 



to 

omit 


the 

Proposal from its proxy materials 

to 

be distributed 



to shareholders in 

connection 

with the Company's 2018 

annual 


meeting of 

shareholders. Biogen argues that 

it is 

entitled to exclude 



the Proposal in reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(7), on the ground that the Proposal 

deals with Biogen’s ordinary business operations; and Rule 14-8(i)(10), because Biogen has 

substantially implemented the Proposal. As discussed more fully below, 

Biogen 


has not met its 

burden of proving its 

entitlement to 

exclude the Proposal in reliance on either of those exclusions 

and the Proponents respectfully urge that Biogen’s request for relief should be denied. 

The Proposal 

The Proposal states: 

RESOLVED, that shareholders of Biogen Inc. (“Biogen”) urge the Compensation Committee (the 



“Committee”) to report annually to shareholders on the extent to which risks related to public 

concern over drug pricing strategies are integrated into Biogen’s incentive compensation policies,

plans and programs (together, “arrangements”) for senior executives. The report should include,

but need not be limited to, discussion of whether incentive compensation arrangements reward,

or not penalize, senior executives for (i) adopting pricing strategies, or making and honoring

commitments about pricing, that incorporate public concern regarding the level or rate of

increase in prescription drug prices; and (ii) considering risks related to drug pricing when

allocating capital. 



Ordinary Business 

Rule 14a-8(i)(7) permits a company to omit a proposal that “deals with a matter relating to the

company’s ordinary business operations. Biogen makes several claims regarding the applicability

of the ordinary business exclusion to the Proposal, none of which has merit. 

Biogen argues that the “thrust and focus” of the Proposal is not senior executive incentive 

compensation arrangements but rather “Biogen’s pricing decisions and related risks.”

Biogen


acknowledges, as it must, that the Proposal “implicates” senior executive compensation, but

urges the Staff to grant its request based on a determination regarding the Proposal’s 

“animating concern.”

Subjective motivation, however, is not ascertainable from a proposal; what



can be analyzed is the content of the proposal and the steps it asks the company to take. 

The Proposal’s resolved clause makes clear that the requested disclosure is not intended to

address drug pricing generally, the prices of particular medicines, access to medicines or any

other similar issue. Rather, the resolved clause asks solely for disclosure of how senior executive 

compensation arrangements reflect pricing-related risks. 

Unlike several of the determinations on which Biogen relies, the Proposal does not request a

policy change that would penalize senior executives for actions relating to an ordinary business 

matter.


A proposal seeking to condition executive compensation payments on the achievement 

No-Action Request, at 6. 



No-Action Request, at 6. 

Delta Air Lines (Mar. 27, 2012); Exelon Corp. (Feb. 21, 2007). Biogen’s reliance on Microsoft, Inc. (Sept. 17,



2013) is misplaced; there, the Staff stated that it allowed exclusion on ordinary business grounds because the

proposal, which focused on the relationship between executive and average employee pay, did not limit its

application to “senior executives.” 



of specific objectives related to the workforce has a weaker focus on senior executive 

compensation than a proposal, like the Proposal, asking for disclosure regarding integration of a

particular risk into compensation arrangements. 

The supporting statement also has a strong focus on senior executive incentive pay, contrary to

Biogen’s claim that it “focuses primarily on the risk to pharmaceutical companies like Biogen of a

public backlash against high drug prices.”

The supporting statement addresses several aspects 



of senior executive pay: compensation philosophy, the role of incentives, the metrics currently

used in Biogen’s incentive compensation arrangements and the risks created when high 

executive pay accompanies sizeable drug price increases. To make the case for why pricing-

related risks are important enough to be considered when setting senior executive compensation, 

the supporting statement also discusses those risks. But that material does not somehow cancel

out or negate the unambiguous language and clear focus of the Proposal on senior executive 

incentive compensation arrangements. 

The Proposal is similar to a 2014 proposal at Gilead Sciences, Inc.

asking that metrics related to



patient access be incorporated into CEO incentive compensation arrangements. In its request for

relief, Gilead argued that although the proposal was “camouflage[d]” as addressing senior 

executive compensation, its “main focus” was to “reduce the prices the Company charges for its 

products.” The Staff disagreed and did not grant relief. Biogen’s effort to shift the subject from

senior executive compensation to drug pricing mirrors Gilead’s unsuccessful attempt.

Outside the drug company context, the Staff has also declined to allow exclusion on ordinary



business grounds of proposals addressing the link between senior executive pay and some other

factor. For example, in BB&T Corporation,

the proposal asked the company to consider the pay



of all company employees when setting senior executive compensation and report to shareholders

in the proxy statement about how it did so. BB&T argued unsuccessfully that the proposal’s 

No-Action Request, at 7. 



Gilead Sciences, Inc. (Feb. 21, 2014) 

That the Gilead proposal requested a policy change while the Proposal seeks disclosure does not affect the



analysis. In its 1983 release accompanying changes to Rule 14a-8, the Commission repudiated the approach it

had used to analyze disclosure proposals, deeming them not excludable on ordinary business grounds 

regardless of the disclosure subject. The Commission announced that disclosure proposals would be analyzed

in the same way as proposals seeking a change in policy or behavior, by reference to the underlying subject

matter rather than the form. (See Exchange Act Release No. 20091 (Aug. 16, 1983); Staff Legal Bulletin 14H

(Oct. 22, 2015))

BB&T Corporation (Jan. 17, 2017). The outcome here differed from that in Microsoft, discussed supra in note

3, because the BB&T proposal addressed “senior executive” compensation. 




focus was general employee compensation and that the proposal could therefore be omitted on

ordinary business grounds. 

Biogen claims that the Proponents’ interest in drug pricing should be taken into account in 

determining the Proposal’s thrust and focus. Specifically, Biogen points to the fact that some of

the Proponents submitted a proposal to the Company in the last proxy season seeking drug

pricing disclosure.

The Proponents do not dispute that they are concerned about the significant



risks unsustainably high prices create for pharmaceutical firms. The Proponents believe that

incentives matter and that senior executive pay should not amplify pricing-related risks or

discourage measures to manage them appropriately. The purpose of the Proposal is to explore 

those connections. 

The Staff declined to adopt the same reasoning Biogen advances here in the 2014 Gilead

Sciences determination.

In Gilead, the president of a patient advocacy organization, the AIDS



Healthcare Foundation (“AHF”), submitted a proposal asking that Gilead incorporate metrics

regarding patient access to Gilead’s medicines into CEO compensation arrangements. Gilead 

urged that the proposal’s “thrust and focus” was not executive pay, but rather drug pricing,

pointing to the “longstanding public relations, media and protest campaign” AHF had been

waging against Gilead to lower its drug prices, including a “die-in” and mock funeral procession

to Gilead’s headquarters. 

Like Biogen, Gilead claimed that “While the resolution and supporting statement include

references to compensation paid to the Company’s CEO, a reading of the Proposal as a whole 

makes clear that the focus of the Proposal is to have the Company make its products available at

a reduced cost.” The Staff did not concur with Gilead’s view that the proposal dealt with the

Company’s ordinary business operations. Biogen’s case here is even weaker than Gilead’s, as the 

Proposal seeks only disclosure, not a policy change that would financially penalize the CEO for

high prices. 

Even assuming the Proposal’s subject were the pricing of pharmaceuticals, high drug prices are a

matter of such consistent and sustained societal debate, with a sufficiently strong connection to

Biogen, to qualify as a significant social policy issue transcending ordinary business. 

Biogen concedes that the Staff has denied requests to exclude on ordinary business grounds two 

types of proposals dealing with pharmaceutical pricing, one seeking a price restraint policy and 

No-Action Request, at 7. 



Gilead Sciences, Inc. (Feb. 21, 2014) 




the other requesting disclosure of drug pricing risks. In Eli Lilly and Company,

10 


Bristol-Myers 

Squibb Company

11 

and Warner Lambert Company



12 

(together, the “price restraint proposals”),

the companies unsuccessfully argued that proposals requesting a policy of pharmaceutical price

restraint were excludable on ordinary business grounds. 

More recently, the Staff declined to allow omission of proposals seeking greater drug pricing

transparency. In the 2015 proxy season, proposals asked Gilead, Vertex and Celgene (together,

the “drug pricing risk disclosure proposals”) to report on the risks created by rising pressure to 

contain U.S. specialty drug prices. All three companies invoked the ordinary business exclusion,

arguing that the proposals concerned the prices charged for their products, which was not a

significant social policy issue, and would micromanage the companies by asking for information

on a complex matter that shareholders would not be in a position to understand.

13 


The proponent

successfully argued that high specialty drug prices are a significant social policy issue and that 

the broad focus on risks and trends obviated concerns over micromanagement. 

Biogen argues that the price restraint and pricing risk disclosure proposals do not apply here

because the Proposal “seeks to delve much more deeply into Biogen’s day-to-day affairs.”

14 


But 

the price restraint proposals sought to affect the prices actually charged for drugs, while the

pricing risk disclosure proposals asked companies to report on how they were responding to

several sources of risk related to drug pricing. The 2014 Gilead proposal, which Biogen does not

address, requested the use of specific CEO pay metrics related to patient access. The Proposal,

by contrast, requests senior executive compensation disclosure to be made only once a year—

hardly a day-to-day matter--and is not overly specific or detailed. 

Biogen also tries to distinguish the Proposal from the price restraint and drug pricing risk

disclosure proposals on the ground that both of those successful formulations were focused on

“providing affordable access to prescription drugs.”

15 

Biogen seems to want to have it both ways,



arguing both that the “thrust and focus” of the Proposal is high drug prices and that the Proposal

differs from proposals that have survived no-action challenge because the Proposal is not about

affordable access to medicines. But patient access is not unrelated to the Proposal, as lack of 

access generates much of the risk created by high drug prices. Accordingly, it is not surprising 

10 

Eli Lilly and Company (Feb. 25, 1993) 



11 

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (Feb. 21, 2000) 

12 

Warner Lambert Company (Feb. 21, 2000) 



13 

Gilead Sciences, Inc. (Feb. 23, 2015); Celgene Corporation (Mar. 19, 2015); Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc.

(Feb. 25, 2015) 

14 


No-Action Request, at 8. 

15 


See No-Action Request, at 8. 


that the “price restraint” proposals mention some of the same factors cited in the Proposal, such

as the risk of legislative or regulatory backlash. Like the price restraint and drug pricing risk

disclosure proposals, and in contrast to the drug pricing proposals the Staff allowed companies to 

omit last year (cited on pages 7-8 of the No-Action Request), the Proposal does not seek detailed

product-related data. 

Biogen claims that the Proposal is excludable, even if it “may touch upon” a significant social

policy issue, where the Staff finds that “its primary focus” is an ordinary business matter.

16 


That 

is just another way of saying that the Proposal is excludable if its subject is not deemed to be a

significant social policy issue, which does not seem to be in dispute. 

In the determinations cited by Biogen on page 9 of the No-Action Request, the subject of the 

proposal had some connection to a significant social policy issue, such as animal cruelty or plant

closings. However, either a sufficiently strong nexus did not exist because the company was a

retailer whose role was passive

17 


or the subject of the proposal was muddied by grafting on

elements that would interfere with day-to-day management and attenuated the connection to the

significant social policy issue.

18 


Neither of those factors is present here. 

The Commission’s 1998 release

19 

clearly explains that if the subject of a proposal is a significant



social policy issue, the fact that the subject implicates ordinary business matters like pricing is 

irrelevant: “

[P]roposals relating to [ordinary business] matters but focusing on 

sufficiently significant social policy issues (e.g., significant discrimination matters) 

generally would not be considered to be excludable, because the proposals would transcend the 

day-to-day business matters and raise policy issues so significant that it would be appropriate for 

a shareholder vote.” (emphasis added) 

Since the Staff issued its determinations on the drug pricing risk disclosure proposals, discussed 

above, the public debate over high drug prices has only intensified. Shortly before his

inauguration, President Trump warned that the drug industry was “getting away with murder” 

16 


No-Action Request, at 6 

17 


Amazon Inc. (Mar. 27, 2015); PetSmart Inc. (Mar. 24, 2011) 

18 


CIGNA Corp. (Feb. 23, 2011) (proposal added an element asking for disclosure of expense management to a

proposal on health care reform); Capital One Financial Corp. (Feb. 3, 2005) (proposal addressed plant closings,

which in some proposal formulations had been considered a significant social policy issue, but requested that

the company provide detailed information about outsourcing and plant closings). 

19 

Exchange Act Release No. 40018 (May 21, 1998). 




and promised government action.

20 


Nine months later, he claimed that “the world is taking

advantage of us” and indicated a desire bring U.S. drug prices closer to those paid outside the 

U.S.

21 


Recent developments have shown that the significant social policy issue of high drug prices has a

sufficiently strong nexus to Biogen that exclusion of the Proposal on ordinary business grounds

would be inappropriate. Biogen has been the subject of significant criticism for its pricing of

Spinraza, which treats spinal muscular atrophy (“SMA”), a deadly genetic muscle-wasting

disease. The first-year price for Spinraza was set at $750,000, with each year thereafter costing

$375,000.

22 

In a Harvard Business Review article ominously titled “The Cost of Drugs for Rare 



Diseases is Threatening the U.S. Healthcare System,” a neuromuscular disease specialist who

treats SMA patients estimated that the cost of treating the most severely affected U.S. patients

for just the first year would be $3.8 billion.

23 


One analyst speculated that Spinraza’s pricing 

might be “the straw that breaks the camel’s back in terms of the U.S. market’s tolerance for rare 

disease drug pricing.”

24 


Controversy has also followed from Biogen’s price hikes for its drugs to treat multiple sclerosis

(“MS”).


25 

Congressmen Elijah Cummings and Peter Welch began an investigation into the price

increases, requesting information from Biogen and other makers of MS drugs and citing concerns 

20 


E.g., Eric Sagonowsky, “Trump to Pharma: You’re ‘Getting Away With Murder,’ and I’m the One to Stop It,” 

FiercePharma, Jan. 11, 2017 (https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/trump-hints-to-plans-for-pharma-first-

post-election-presser)

Sarah Karlin-Smith, “Trump Renews Attacks on High Drug Prices,” Politico, Oct. 16, 2017

(https://www.politico.com/story/2017/10/16/trump-attacks-high-drug-prices-243836)

Carolyn Y. Johnson, “Here’s Why Pharma is Happy to Help Foot the Bill for this $750,000 Drug,” The 

Washington Post, June 9, 2017 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/heres-why-pharma-is-happy-to-

help-foot-the-bill-for-this-750000-drug/2017/06/09/f29da05a-4a14-11e7-9669-

250d0b15f83b_story.html?utm_term=.85bfe1df908c); see also Julie Appleby, “Drug Puts a $750,000 ‘Price Tag

on Life’,” NPR, Aug. 1, 2017 (https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/08/01/540100976/drug-puts-a-750-

000-price-tag-on-life); Robert Weisman & Jonathan Saltzman, “The New Price of Hope,” The Boston Globe,

Dec. 17, 2017 

(https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/12/16/spinrazamaincopy/C8MJfCn2ZPS9wcQU3ziJCP/story.html)

A. Gordon Smith, “The Cost of Drugs for Rare Diseases is Threatening the U.S. Healthcare System,”

Harvard Business Review, Apr. 7, 2017 (https://hbr.org/2017/04/the-cost-of-drugs-for-rare-diseases-is-

threatening-the-u-s-health-care-system)

Aimee Picchi, “The Cost of Biogen’s New Drug: $750,000 Per Patient,” CBS News Moneywatch, Dec. 29,

2016 (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-cost-of-biogens-new-drug-spinraza-750000-per-patient/)

Max Stendahl, “Biogen Boosts Price of Top MS Drugs, Analyst Says,” Boston Business Journal, Jan. 3, 2017

(https://www.bizjournals.com/boston/news/2017/01/03/biogen-boosts-price-of-top-drugs-analyst-says.html) 




that prices were rising in lockstep. Biogen’s stock price dropped after the investigation was

announced.

26 

Finally, although Biogen does not explicitly claim that the Proposal would micro-manage the



Company, that line of argument is suggested by Biogen’s claim that the pricing decisions are

“matters of a complex nature upon which shareholders, as a group, [are] not in . . . a position to 

make an informed judgment.” As discussed at some length above, disclosures regarding drugs 

and their prices, standing alone, would not be responsive to the Proposal, which asks for

reporting on senior executive compensation arrangements. 

The ways in which senior executive compensation arrangements take into account a particular

business challenge are not foreign to shareholders. Shareholders consider proxy statement

disclosure explaining the link between strategic objectives or aspects of the business climate and

executive compensation arrangements when casting votes on ballot items. That disclosure may

describe factors related to external pressures or risks. For instance, in its statement in

opposition to a 2017 shareholder proposal on reserve-related compensation metrics,

ConocoPhillips explained how climate change scenario planning and progress on low-carbon

objectives were reflected in senior executive compensation arrangements.

27 


Accordingly, the 

Proposal cannot be said to micromanage Biogen. 

In summary, the Proposal’s subject is senior executive incentive compensation, a topic that has

consistently been deemed a significant social policy issue transcending ordinary business. Even if

high drug prices were considered the Proposal’s subject, though, the broad focus on policy, as

opposed to details about specific medicines, takes it out of the realm of ordinary business. As 

well, a sufficient nexus exists between the broader issue of high drug prices and Biogen’s 

business. Shareholders have substantial experience evaluating disclosures regarding senior

executive pay arrangements, including the ways in which those arrangements incorporate risks

or business challenges. Biogen has thus failed to meet its burden of establishing that it is 

entitled to exclude the Proposal in reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(7). 

Substantial Implementation 

Allison Gatlin, “Biogen, Teva Slip After After Democrats Launch MS Drug Pricing Probe,” Investors 

Business Daily, Aug. 17, 2017 (https://www.investors.com/news/technology/biogen-teva-slip-after-democrats-

launch-ms-drug-pricing-probe/) 

27 

See Proxy Statement filed on April 3, 2017, at 86 




Biogen argues that it has substantially implemented the Proposal, supporting omission under

Rule 14a-8(i)(10) because its current disclosure satisfies the “essential objectives” of the Proposal. 

Biogen contends that the general proxy statement disclosure about compensation metrics and 

compensation risk substantially implements the Proposal. None of that disclosure makes

reference to drug pricing, though. Biogen seems to be asking shareholders to infer that pricing is

not integrated into senior executive incentive compensation arrangements or that it is

incorporated but not discussed in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis section of the proxy

statement because it does not create a “material risk.”

28 

That does not constitute substantial 



implementation of a proposal that requests affirmative reporting on whether and how pricing-

related risks are reflected in senior executive compensation arrangements. 

* * * 

For the 


reasons set forth above, Biogen 

has not satisfied its burden 

of showing that it is entitled 

to omit the Proposal in reliance on Rule 14a-8(i)(7) or 14a-8(i)(10). The Proponents thus 

respectfully request that Biogen’s request for relief be denied.  

The Proponents 

appreciate the 

opportunity to be 

of 

assistance in this matter. If you have 



any 

questions 

or need additional information, please contact me at (571) 551-6865 or our attorney 

Beth Young at (718) 369-6169. 

Sincerely, 

Joshua Brockwell 

Investment Communications Director 

cc: 


James Basta, Senior Vice President and Corporate Secretary, Biogen Inc.

Beth Young, Esq. 

28 

Definitive Proxy Statement of Biogen Inc. filed on Apr. 26, 2017, at 37. 


















*** FISMA & OMB Memorandum M-07-16

***



















December 21, 2017 

Susan H. Alexander 

Corporate Secretary

Biogen, Inc.

225 Binney Street

Cambridge, MA 02142 

Email: 

susan.alexander@biogenidec.com 



Dear Ms. Alexander: 

I am writing you on behalf of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate OIP Investment Trust to co-file the 

stockholder resolution on Senior Executive Incentives – Integrate Drug Pricing Risk. In brief, the proposal 

states 


RESOLVED

, that shareholders of Biogen Inc. (“Biogen”) urge the Compensation Committee to report 

annually to shareholders on the extent to which risks related to public concern over drug pricing strategies are 

integrated into Biogen’s incentive compensation policies, plans and programs (together, “arrangements”) for 

senior executives. The report should include, but need not be limited to, discussion of whether incentive 

compensation arrangements reward, or not penalize, senior executives for (i) adopting pricing strategies, or 

making and honoring commitments about pricing, that incorporate public concern regarding the level or rate of 

increase in prescription drug prices; and (ii) considering risks related to drug pricing when allocating capital. 

I am hereby authorized to notify you of our intention to co-file this shareholder proposal with Azzad Asset 

Management. I submit it for inclusion in the 2018 proxy statement for consideration and action by the 

shareholders at the 2018 annual meeting in accordance with Rule 14-a-8 of the General Rules and 

Regulations of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. We are the beneficial owner, as defined in Rule 13d-3 

of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, of 159 Biogen, Inc. shares. 

We have been a continuous shareholder for one year of $2,000 in market value of Biogen, Inc. stock and will 

continue to hold at least $2,000 of Biogen, Inc. stock through the next annual meeting. Verification of our 

ownership position from our custodian is enclosed.  A representative of the filers will attend the stockholders’ 

meeting to move the resolution as required by SEC rules. 

We truly hope that the company will be willing to dialogue with the filers about this proposal. We consider 

Azzad Asset Management the lead filer of this resolution and as so is authorized to act on our behalf in all 

aspects of the resolution including negotiation and withdrawal. Please note that the contact person for this 

resolution/proposal will be Joshua Brockwell of Azzad Asset Management who may be reached by phone 703-

207-7005 x109 or by email: 

joshua@azzad.net

. As a co-filer, however, we respectfully request direct 

communication from the company and to be listed in the proxy. 

Respectfully yours, 

Rev. Sèamus Finn, OMI 

Chief of Faith Consistent Investing 

OIP Investment Trust 

Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate 

391 Michigan Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20017 -- Tel:  202-529-4505  Fax: 202-529-4572 

Website:  

www.omiusajpic.org 

Email:  


seamus@omiusa.org 


Senior Executive Incentives – Integrate Drug Pricing Risk 

2018 – Biogen, Inc. 

RESOLVED, that shareholders of Biogen Inc. (“Biogen”) urge the Compensation Committee to report annually to 

shareholders on the extent to which risks related to public concern over drug pricing strategies are integrated into 

Biogen’s incentive compensation policies, plans and programs (together, “arrangements”) for senior executives. The 

report should include, but need not be limited to, discussion of whether incentive compensation arrangements 

reward, or not penalize, senior executives for (i) adopting pricing strategies, or making and honoring commitments 

about pricing, that incorporate public concern regarding the level or rate of increase in prescription drug prices; and 

(ii) considering risks related to drug pricing when allocating capital. 

SUPPORTING STATEMENT: As long-term investors, we believe that senior executive incentive compensation 

arrangements should reward creation of sustainable long-term value. To that end, it is important that those 

arrangements align with company strategy and encourage responsible risk management. 

A key risk facing pharmaceutical companies is backlash against high drug prices. Public outrage over high prices 

and their impact on patient access may force price rollbacks and harm corporate reputation. Legislative or regulatory 

investigations regarding pricing of prescription medicines may bring about broader changes. (E.g., 

https://democrats-oversight.house.gov/news/press-releases/cummings-and-welch-launch-investigation-of-drug-

companies-skyrocketing-prices; https://democrats-oversight.house.gov/news/press-releases/cummings-and-welch-

propose-medicare-drug-negotiation-bill-in-meeting-with) 

Biogen was publicly criticized in 2017 for the $750,000 first-year price tag, and $375,000 annual cost thereafter, for 

new spinal muscular atrophy treatment Spinraza. (E.g., https://www.npr.org/sections/health-

shots/2017/08/01/540100976/drug-puts-a-750-000-price-tag-on-life) Congressional attention has also recently 

focused on the price of drugs for multiple sclerosis, including those sold by Biogen. 

(https://www.investors.com/news/technology/biogen-teva-slip-after-democrats-launch-ms-drug-pricing-probe/) 

We are encouraged by Biogen’s improved transparency on pricing. We are concerned, however, that the incentive 

compensation arrangements applicable to Biogen’s senior executives may not encourage senior executives to take 

actions that result in lower short-term financial performance even when those actions may be in Biogen’s best long-

term financial interests. 

Biogen uses revenue and earnings per share as metrics for the annual bonus (together with strategic goals), and 

revenue and free cash flow as the metrics for the cash settled performance units program. (2017 Proxy Statement, at 

38-41) A recent Credit Suisse analyst report found that “US drug price rises contributed 100% of industry EPS 

growth in 2016” and characterized that fact as “the most important issue for a Pharma investor today.” The report 

identified Biogen as a company where U.S. net price increases accounted for at least 100% of 2016 EPS growth. 

(Global Pharma and Biotech Sector Review: Exploring Future US Pricing Pressure, Apr. 18, 2017, at 1) 

In our view, excessive dependence on drug price increases is a risky and unsustainable strategy, especially when 

price hikes drive large senior executive payouts. For example, media coverage noted that a 600% rise in Mylan’s 

CEO’s total compensation accompanied the 400% EpiPen price increase. (See, e.g., 

https://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/mylan-execs-gave-themselves-raises-they-hiked-epipen-prices-

n636591; https://www.wsj.com/articles/epipen-maker-dispenses-outsize-pay-1473786288; 

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/mylan-top-executive-pay-was-second-highest-in-industry-just-as-company-

raised-epipen-prices-2016-09-13) 

The requested disclosure would allow shareholders to assess the extent to which compensation arrangements 

encourage senior executives to responsibly manage risks relating to drug pricing and contribute to long-term value 

creation. We urge shareholders to vote for this Proposal. 





















Yüklə 0,5 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə