Exploring the relationship between paranormal experiences, mental health and boundaries, and psi



Yüklə 172,38 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix13.11.2017
ölçüsü172,38 Kb.
#10227


 

 



NB: This is a draft manuscript. If you wish to cite this paper, please refer to the final version, 

published in Personality and Individual Differences

 

Paranormal experiences, mental health and mental boundaries, and psi 



Thomas Rabeyron and Caroline Watt 

Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, UK 



 

 

 

Abstract  

Previous  research  has  suggested  that  paranormal  beliefs  and  experiences  are  associated  with  thinner 

mental  boundaries  and  traumas  during  childhood.  This  paper  examines  more  thoroughly  the 

relationship  between  paranormal  experiences,  mental  health  and  boundaries,  and  psi  abilities.  162 

participants  completed  questionnaires  about  paranormal  experiences  (AEI),  mental  health  (MHI-17), 

mental  boundaries  (BQ-Sh),  traumas  during  childhood  (CATS)  and  life-changing  events  (LES).  A 

controlled psi experiment was also conducted. Significant correlations were found between paranormal 

experiences  and  mental  boundaries,  traumas  and  negative  life  events.  The  overall  results  were  non-

significant for the  psi task and no significant correlation  was found between psychological variables 

and psi results. These findings suggest that mainly mental boundaries concerning unusual experiences 

and childlikeness

 

are associated with paranormal experiences. They also highlight the importance of 



association  between  emotional  abuse  and  paranormal  experiences,  and  that  paranormal  experiences 

occur especially frequently after negative life events.  

  

Keywords  : paranormal  experiences,  mental boundaries,  trauma,  mental  health,  negative  life  events, 

retro-priming, psi, precognition. 

 

 

 



 

 



 

 



 

1. Introduction  

 

Given  the  fact  that  more  than  half  of  the  population  has  had  at  least  one  paranormal 



experience

1

  (Ross  &  Joshi,  1992),  it  is  important  to  understand  why  people  have  such 



experiences. They are sometimes considered as being associated with mental disorders and the 

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV) provides criteria for several 

mental  disorders  accompanied  by  paranormal  experiences.  This  association  is  confirmed  by 

several studies showing a correlation between paranormal beliefs and magical ideation (Eckbald 

&  Chapman,  1983;  Tobacyk  &  Wilkinson,  1990),  hypomania  and  schizophrenia  (Windholz  & 

Diamant, 1974), manic depressiveness (Thalbourne & French, 1995) and negative relation with 

psychological  adjustment  (Irwin,  1991).  On  the  other  hand,  some  research  has  suggested  that 

there is no link between paranormal experiences and mental health disorders  (Goulding, 2004) 

and  that  these  experiences  could  potentially  improve  well-being  (Kennedy  &  Kanthamani, 

1995).  

Most of the current  research addressing the connection between paranormal beliefs and 

experiences  and  mental  health  uses  the  concept  of  schizotypy,  a  multi-factorial  personality 

construct that appears to be on a continuum with psychosis (Claridge, 1997). A large amount of 

research  has  indeed  shown  a  link  between  schizotypy  and  paranormal  belief  and  experiences 

(Schofield & Claridge, 2007). But people who have such experiences mainly have high scores on 

scales  of  strange  perceptions  and  beliefs,  and  rarely  have  high  scores  on  negative  symptoms. 

Thus,  the  notions  of  “happy  schizotypes”  and  "healthy  schizotypes"  have  been  proposed 

(McCreery & Claridge, 1995), and a fully dimensional model of schizotypy has been developed, 

                                                 

1

 When we refer to paranormal "experiences", we are referring to the individual’s attribution that an experience is 



paranormal. We make no assumptions as to the validity of this attribution. 


 

 



in which a person can be at an extreme of the schizotypy scale without suffering from a mental 

disorder. People who have paranormal experiences could belong to this category.  

It  seems  appropriate  to  question  whether  these  experiences  as  a  whole  should  be 

associated with lower mental health and most of the studies have so far concerned paranormal 

beliefs  rather  than  paranormal  experiences.  Thus,  it  seems  relevant  to  use  a  clinical  tool  to 

attempt  to  understand  more  precisely  whether,  overall,  paranormal  experiences  are  associated 

with mental health disorders.  

Other  research  into  the  psychological  variables  that  correlate  with  paranormal 

experiences suggest that thinner mental boundaries, that is the postulated thickness of relations 

between  different  mental  structures  (emotions,  thoughts,  cognitive  process,  etc.),  may  be  an 

important  factor.  Paranormal  experiences  and  mental  boundaries  have  been  studied  primarily 

through the concept of transliminality (Thalbourne, 2000). The notion of mental boundaries has 

also  been  widely  studied  by  Hartmann  and  several  distinct  boundaries  in  the  mind  have  been 

found  (for  example,  about  frequency  of  unusual  experiences  or  need  for  order)  (Hartmann, 

1991).  Although  research  indicates  links  between  thinner  mental  boundaries  and  paranormal 

experiences (Houran, Thalbourne, & Hartmann, 2003), we don't yet know very precisely which 

kind of mental boundaries are associated with paranormal experiences. 

Paranormal  beliefs  and  experiences  have  also  been  associated  with  childhood  trauma 

(Wilson  &  Barber,  1983;  Irwin,  1992),  abuse  (Ross  &  Joshi,  1992;  Lawrence  et  al.,  1995; 

Perkins  &  Allen,  2006),  need  for  interpersonal  control  (Irwin,  1994),  and  a  perceived  lack  of 

childhood control (Watt, Watson, & Wilson, 2007). But, it seems that relatively few studies have 

addressed specifically the links between paranormal experiences and trauma. The present study 

aims  to  understand  more  precisely  which  sorts  of  traumas  influence  the  occurrence  of 

paranormal experiences.   




 

 



Paranormal  experiences  have  also  been  associated  with  negative  affect  and  negative 

experiences  (Lindeman  &  Aarnio,  2006).  From  a  qualitative  analysis  (Rabeyron,  2006),  it 

appeared  that  paranormal  experiences  seem  to  occur  frequently  after  important  negative  life 

events.  This  connection  with  paranormal  experiences,  however,  has  not  yet  been  empirically 

demonstrated.   

Finally,  paranormal  experiences  could  also  be  considered  as  a  consequence  of  specific  

interactions,  called  "psi",  between  individuals  and  their  environment  (Irwin  &  Watt,  2007). 

Despite the fact that such a hypothesis is highly controversial (Alcock, Burns, & Freeman, 2003), 

some  results  suggest  that  this  case  cannot  be  dismissed  easily  (Bem  &  Honorton,  1994),  and 

more research is needed to address this question.  

Thus,  the  present  study  will  examine  more  thoroughly  the  relationship  between 

paranormal experiences, mental health and boundaries, and psi. We predict that people reporting 

paranormal experiences will have thinner mental boundaries and we will determine which kind 

of mental boundaries are associated with paranormal experiences. We will then assess the links 

between paranormal experiences and mental health by using a clinical tool (MHI-17). We also 

predict  that  people  who  have  reported  trauma  during  childhood  will  have  more  paranormal 

experiences and we will analyse what kind of trauma. We then predict that people who have had 

paranormal experiences will have significantly more negative life events.  

A  second  series  of  hypotheses  will  test  what  would  be  expected  to  hold  if  psi  was  a 

genuine phenomenon.  We predict that people with  a higher score on a controlled psi  task will 

have  more  paranormal  experiences,  and  especially  extra-sensory  perception  experiences,  than 

those with lower scores. We also predict they will have more beliefs in the paranormal, thinner 

mental  boundaries, and more traumas during childhood than people who don't  score highly on 

the psi task.  

 



 

 



 

 

 



2. Methods  

 

2.1 Participants  

Given  that  the  effect  size  on  the  psi  task  was  supposed  to  be  small  considering  the 

literature,  we  used  different  possibilities  to  find  a  lot  of  participants.  There  was  no  specific 

inclusion or exclusion criteria except the fact that participants didn't suffer from vision or health 

problem  that  could  have  influenced  their  psi  task  results.  162  Participants  were  recruited:  31 

from  a  general  population  volunteer  panel  in  Edinburgh  University’s  Psychology  Department, 

114  students  from  Edinburgh  University’s  intranet  website  and  17  other  participants  from 

advertisements in shops and internet websites. There were more females (71.6%) than males in 

the whole group. The median age was 28.64 years (range = 18 to 76).  



 

2.2 Measures  

Anomalous Experiences Inventory (AEI):  This scale is a 70-item true-false questionnaire 

designed to investigate unusual, anomalous and paranormal experiences, beliefs and abilities, as 

well as including questions relating to drug and alcohol use and fear of the paranormal (e.g. "

 I 


have  had  a  psychic  experience",  "I  am  able  to  communicate  with  the  dead")

. The  AEI  has  adequate 

reliability and validity  (Gallagher, Kumar, & Pekala, 1994). We used 4 of the subscales of the 

AEI:  paranormal  experiences  (29  items),  paranormal  ability  (16  items),  paranormal  belief  (12 

items)  and  paranormal  fear  (6  items).  We  also  used  two  other  subscales  of  the  AEI  (the 

encounter and poltergeist subscales) and we designed for this study an ESP subscale (11 items)

.

  




 

 



Mental  Health  Inventory  (MHI-17):  A  17-item  version  of  the  Mental  Health  Inventory  

(Stewart, Ware, Sherbourne, & Wells, 1992) was used. Participants have to evaluate their mental 

health  during  the  last  two  weeks.  There  are  five  subscales  in  the  MHI-17:  anxiety  (4  items), 

depression (4 items), behavioural and emotional control (4 items), general positive (4 items) and 

emotional ties (1 item). Higher scores on total MHI score indicate better mental health.  

Short Boundary Questionnaire (BQ-Sh): The BQ-Sh (Rawlings, 2001) is an empirically 

derived shortened version of the 145-item Hartmann Boundary Questionnaire (Hartmann, 1991). 

The BQ-Sh consists of 46 items (e.g. "

My dreams are so vivid that even later I can't tell them from 

waking reality", "I like clear, precise borders", "I am a very sensitive person")

 with a 5-point Likert-

type scale and corresponds to six subscales: unusual experiences (12 items), need for order (12 

items), trust (6 items), perceived competence (9 items), childlikeness (5 items) and sensitivity (2 

items).  The  BQ-Sh  has  adequate  psychometric  properties  (Rawlings,  2001)  and  it  can  be 

considered  as  a  satisfactory  alternative  to  the  Boundary  questionnaire,  with  which  it  strongly 

correlates (= 0.88). 

Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS): This scale provides information on the frequency 

and  extent  of  negative  childhood  experiences  (Sanders  &  Becker-Lausen,  1995).  The  CATS 

consists  of  38  items  concerning  the  general  atmosphere  of  respondents’  childhood  home 

environment and treatment, with answers on a 5-point scale ranging from “never”(0) to “always” 

(5). Three subscales relate to negative home environment/neglect, sexual abuse and punishment. 

A previous study demonstrated strong internal consistency and test-retest reliability (Sanders & 

Becker-Lausen,  1995).  We  also  used  the  Emotional  Abuse  Subscale  that  was  subsequently 

developed (Kent & Waller, 1998).  



Life  Experiences  Survey  (LES):  The  LES  is  a  60-item  instrument  designed  to  measure 

stressful  life  events  and  importance  of  life  experiences  (Sarason,  Johnson,  &  Siegel,  1978). 

Participants  indicate  for  each  event  whether  the  event  occurred  within  the  last  six  months  or 



 

 



within  the  last  six  to  twelve  months.  The  LES  assesses  the  type  of  appraisal  of  the  life 

experiences (positive or negative). The measure is set on a 7-point Likert-type scale anchored by 

extremely  negative  (-3)  and  extremely  positive  (3).  The  test-retest  reliability  for  the  LES  is 

sufficient.  



Questions about mental health and paranormal experiences: The questionnaire included 

two  questions  about  mental  health  (“Have  you  already  suffered  from  mental  disorders?”  and 

“Have you already been in therapy?”). Participants were also asked if they had had a paranormal 

experience  during  the  last  year.  If  a  personal  event  had  happened  before  the  paranormal 

experience, they had to briefly describe it.  

 

2.3 Psi Task  

 

The computer used was a Dell Optiplex 745 with Windows XP. The program used for the 



psi  task was designed by  Daryl  Bem  at  Cornell University with  REAL basic.  It  was a slightly 

different version than the one used by Bem (2008): this version used pictures as prime instead of 

words. We used a Windows version of this software, using an algorithm to generate a random 

sequence  of  numbers.  The  software  used  64  different  images  selected  from  the  International 

Affective  Picture  System.  These  pictures  could  be  "positive"  pictures  (e.g.  happy  people)  or 

"negative" pictures (e.g.  car crash).  Between each trial, participants  were shown briefly on the 

screen a picture of a sky with stars in order to avoid an influence from the previous trial on their 

response time. 

 

This psi task was a precognitive experiment in which response time of participants was 



measured in order to see if they would be influenced by a prime they would see not before but 

after an emotional picture. Participants were shown a word on each of 64 trials and were asked to 

press one of two keys on the keyboard as quickly as they could, to indicate whether the word was 

pleasant or unpleasant. The participant’s response time in making this judgment was the major 



 

 



dependent  variable,  and  the  difference  in  mean  response  times  between  incongruent  and 

congruent  trials  was  the  index  of  a  priming  effect,  with  positive  differences  denoting  faster 

responding to congruent trials. The first 32 trials constituted the retroactive priming procedure, 

and participants were told that a picture would be flashed on the screen just after they made their 

decision. In this condition, when the participant has a positive result, it appears as though he or 

she  has  been  "influenced"  by  the  picture  seen  after  the  word.  A  participant  who  is  very 

permeable to psi information is expected therefore to obtain a very positive score. The remaining 

32  trials  constituted  the  standard  “forward”  priming  procedure,  and  participants  were  told  that 

from this point on, the flashed picture would appear before rather than after they had made their 

response.  The  standard  priming  condition  was  used  in  order  to  be  able  to  compare  psi  results 

with  a  classical  priming  effect  but  also  to  investigate  possible  correlations  between  priming 

results and other variables.  

Response times shorter than 250 ms or longer than 2500 ms were regarded as outliers and 

were excluded from the data analysis, as were trials on which the participant made an error in 

judging  the  picture  to  be  pleasant  or  unpleasant.  Finally,  because  response-time  data  were 

positively skewed, all response times were log-transformed. Shown below is the time sequence 

of events for Forward Priming and Retroactive Priming trials, respectively. 

Forward Priming Trial  

Stimulus 

Fixation spot 

Picture (prime) 

Blank 

Word 

Starry Sky 

Time (ms) 

1000 


150 

150 


Response Time 

2000 


 

Retroactive Priming Trial  

Stimulus 

Fixation spot 

Word 

Blank 

Picture (prime) 

Blank 

Starry Sky 

Time (ms) 

1000 


Response Time 

300 


500 

1000 


2000 

 

2.4 Procedure 


 

 



Participants met the experimenter at the Psychology Building. They were invited to read 

the information sheet, sign the consent form and complete the questionnaires, after which they 

did  the  psi  experiment.  Finally,  participants  were  debriefed  and  were  paid  £5.  They  received 

study results by email. The study was approved by the Department of Psychology’s ethics panel. 



 

3. Results 

 

3.1 Inter-correlations between variables   

The results were analysed using SPSS 14. For analysis of the priming and retro-priming 

results, 7 participants were eliminated, having made 16 or more errors (>25% of the trials). Age 

was correlated negatively with BQ-Sh (r

= -.18, p < 0.05, two tailed) and Negative Life Events 



(r

s

 = -.33, p < 0.01, two tailed). There was no significant difference between the male and female 



groups and data were not normally distributed. All descriptive data are available in table 1.  

 

[Table 1] 



 

The correlations between the main variables are shown in Table 2. As predicted, BQ-Sh 

(r

s

  =  .33),  CATS  (r



s

  =  .44)  and  Negative  Life  Events  (r

s

  =  .29)  correlated  significantly  with 



paranormal experiences. 

 

[Table 2] 



 

MHI  correlated  significantly  negatively  with  paranormal  experiences  (r

=  -.16)  but  a 



series of partial correlations were carried out to explore more precisely the relationships between 

variables. A partial correlation between mental health (MHI) and paranormal experiences (AEI), 




10 

 

 



while  controlling  the  scores  on  childhood  traumas  (CATS),  was  not  significant  (r  =  .02,  ns). 

Similarly,  following  a  partial  correlation  to  explore  the  relationship  between  mental  health 

(MHI) and paranormal experiences (AEI), while controlling for negative life events (LES), the 

correlation between paranormal experiences and mental health was no longer significant (r = .04, 

ns). A partial correlation was also performed between paranormal experiences and negative life 

events,  while  controlling  for  traumas.  The  correlation  was  still  significant  (r  =  .17,  p  <  0.05). 

Finally, a partial correlation was used to explore the relationship between traumas and negative 

life  events,  while  controlling  for  paranormal  experiences.  The  correlation  between  trauma  and 

negative life events was not significant (r = .07, ns).  

 

3.2 Group comparisons  

Participants were divided into two groups based on their score on the AEI - Paranormal 

Experiences subscale. Those participants with a score less than or equal to 5 experiences were 

considered to be "few paranormal experiences participants" (P-, n = 86) and those with a score 

greater than or equal to 6 were considered "many paranormal experiences participants" (P+, n = 

76). This division has been chosen with the use of the mean (mean = 6.16) in order to have two 

groups with the closest number of participants. Mean Rank, Mean, SD, U, Z and r for the P- and 

P+ groups on main measures are presented in Table 3.  

 

[Table 3] 



 

We found significant differences between the two groups on the BQ-Sh scale (r = -.25, p 



< 0.001), BQ-Sh - Unusual Experiences subscale (r = -.30, p < 0.001) and BQ-Sh - Childlikeness 

(r = -.24, p < 0.01) but also CATS (r = -.38, p < 0.001), all CATS subscales and Negative Life 

events scale (r = -.24, p < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between the two groups on 



11 

 

 



the  other  BQ-Sh  subscales,  on  all  the  MHI  scales  and  on  priming  and  retro-Priming  results. 

There were significant differences between groups on the items “have you already suffered from 

mental disorders?” (X

2

 (1) = 3.81, p < 0.05, one tailed, phi = 0.15) and “have you already been in 



therapy?” (X

2

 (1) = 3.65, p < 0.05, one tailed, phi = - 0.15). 



 

3.3 Analysis of psi results  

The results on the retro-priming task were not significant (t = 1.32, df = 154, p = 0.09, r = 

0.11) while they were significant on the priming task (t = 8.06, df = 154, p < 0.001, r = 0.65).  A 

group  comparison  between  negative  and  positive  retro-priming  results  groups  has  been 

conducted.  There  were  no  significant  differences  on  the  predicted  psychological  variables 

between the two groups. We can nevertheless note that group comparisons showed that people 

with  positive  psi  results  had  slightly  thinner  mental  boundaries,  more  paranormal  and  ESP 

experiences and better mental health. 



 

4. Discussion  

 

The present study examined the relationship between paranormal experiences and several 

psychological  characteristics.  Most  hypotheses  have  been  confirmed.  First  of  all,  people  who 

have had paranormal experiences have thinner mental boundaries. Only unusual experiences and 

childlikeness  subscales  were  individually  significant  for  paranormal  experiences  on  group 

comparison,  which  suggest  that  people  who  have  paranormal  experiences  have  specifically 

thinner  mental  boundaries  on  these  characteristics.  Interestingly,  there  was  also  a  significant 

correlation  between  the  priming  results  and  the  boundaries  questionnaire  stemming  especially 

from the correlation with the unusual experiences subscales (r

 

= 0.29, < 0.001). Future research 



could try to replicate and explain this effect. 


12 

 

 



We  also  found  a  small  negative  correlation  between  mental  health  and  paranormal 

experiences,  which  is  confirmed  by  the  fact  that  the  group  of  people  who  have  had  a  lot  of 

paranormal experiences reported having suffer from more mental disorders. Nevertheless, partial 

correlations suggested that this link may be an artifact, being mediated by traumas and negative 

life  events.  This  is  confirmed  by  a  group  comparison  showing  no  significant  differences  on 

mental  health  between  people  having  many  or  few  paranormal  experiences.  Therefore, 

paranormal  experiences  cannot  intrinsically  be  associated  with  mental  health  disorders. 

Furthermore,  people  who  had  many  paranormal  experiences  responded  that  they  had  spent 

significantly less time in therapy than people who reported fewer paranormal experiences.  

 

We  also  found  a  strong  significant  correlation  between  paranormal  experiences  and 



traumas.  This  correlation  was  stronger  between  traumas  and  paranormal  experiences  than 

between  traumas  and  paranormal  beliefs,  consistent  with  Lawrence  et  al.’s  model  (1995). 

Emotional  abuse  was  the  more  significant  measure  on  group  comparison.  Paranormal 

experiences  could  thus  be  particularly  associated  with  this  kind  of  abuse.  The  subjective 

perception  of  a  spurning  or  terrorising  environment  during  childhood,  studied  with  the  CATS, 

could be an important aetiological factor in paranormal experiences. Future studies could verify 

that  this  link  is  not  the  consequence  of  better  memories  or  imagination  of  people  who  have 

paranormal  experiences,  even  if  we  already  know  that  there  is  research  suggesting  a  real  link 

between paranormal beliefs and traumas (French & Kerman, 1996). It could also be relevant to 

analyze more precisely the association between childhood abuse, the development of dissociative 

experiences and specific paranormal experiences. 

 

We also showed that negative life events and paranormal experiences were correlated as 



predicted.  This  link  was  confirmed  by  the  fact  that  more  than  half  of  the  participants  who 

reported  a  paranormal  experience  during  the  last  year  also  reported  one  important  life  change 

before the paranormal experience. Paranormal experiences could thus be considered as a specific 



13 

 

 



coping strategy for those facing negative life events.  Future research should pay attention more 

precisely  to  correlations  between  different  kind  of  negative  events  and  specific  paranormal 

experiences.  

If  most  of  the  psychological  hypotheses  have  been  confirmed,  none  of  the  hypotheses 

about psi led to firm conclusions. The overall psi results were non-significant even if they were 

in the predicted direction with an effect size (r = .11)  relatively close to previous research (Bem, 

2008). Even if this result could  merely be the sign of the non-existence of psi,  it could  be the 

consequence  of  the  use  of  a  slightly  different  version  of  the  software.  Thus,  It  may  be  more 

relevant to take words as prime instead of pictures as in previous research using this protocol. A 

post-hoc  analysis  also  showed  that  participants  from  the  positive  retro-priming  group  were 

significantly  slightly  younger  than  the  negative  retro-priming  group  (U  =  2418,  mean  age  = 

27.90, SD = 13.27, p < 0.05, two tailed). As our population was on average older than the one 

used by Bem (2008), this could be an eventual explanation for the lower effect that we obtained. 

However, as this is a post hoc finding, further formal testing of this hypothesis is necessary 

In  conclusion,  this  study  suggests  that  specific  mental  boundaries  are  associated  with 

paranormal  experiences.  It  highlights  the  association between emotional  abuse and paranormal 

experiences  and  demonstrates  that  paranormal  experiences  occur  especially  frequently  after 

negative life events. 

 

References 

 

Alcock, J. E., Burns, J., & Freeman, A. (2003). Psi Wars: getting to grips with the paranormal

Charlottesville: Imprint Academic. 



14 

 

 



Bem,  D.  J.  (2008).  Feeling  the  future  III:  additional  experimental  evidence  for  apparent 

retroactive  influences  on  cognition  and  affect.  in  Paper  presented  at  the  51st  Annual 



Convention of the Parapsychological Association. Winchester. 

Bem,  D.  J.,  &  Honorton,  C.  (1994).  Does  Psi  Exist?  replicable  evidence  for  an  anomalous 

process of information Transfer. Psychological Bulletin115(1), 4-18. 

Claridge, G. (1997). Schizotypy: implications for illness and health. Oxford: Oxford University 

Press. 

Eckbald, M., & Chapman, L. (1983). Magical ideation as an indicator of schizotypy . Journal of 



Consulting and Clinical Psychology51(2), 215-225. 

French, C. C., & Kerman, M. K. (1996). Childhood trauma, fantasy proneness and belief in the 

paranormal. In Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society. London. 

Gallagher,  C.,  Kumar,  V.  K.,  &  Pekala,  R.  J.  (1994).  The  anomalous  experiences  inventory: 

Reliability and validity. Journal of Parapsychology58, 402-428. 

Goulding,  A.  (2004).  Mental  health  aspects  of  paranormal  and  psi  related  experiences

Unpublished PhD dissertation. Göteborg: Göteborg University. 

Hartmann, E. (1991). Boundaries in the mind. New York: BasicBooks. 

Houran, J., Thalbourne, M. A., & Hartmann, E. (2003). Comparison of two alternative measures 

of the boundary construct. Perceptual and Motor Skills96(1), 311-23. doi: 12705539. 

Irwin,  H.  J.  (1991).  A  study  of  paranormal  belief,  psychological  adjustment,  and  fantasy 

proneness. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research85(4), 317-331. 

Irwin, H. J. (1992). Origins and functions of paranormal belief: the role of childhood trauma and 

interpersonal  control.  Journal  of  the  American  Society  for  Psychical  Research,  86(3), 

199-208. 

Irwin,  H.  J.  (1994).  Childhood  trauma  and  the  origins  of  paranormal  belief:  a  constructive 

replication. Psychological Reports74(1), 107-11. 



15 

 

 



Irwin, H. J., & Watt, C. (2007). An introduction to parapsychology. Jefferson: McFarland . 

Kennedy, J. E., & Kanthamani, H. (1995). An exploratory study of the effects of paranormal and 

spiritual  experiences  on peoples'  lives  and  well-being.  Journal  of  the  American  Society 

for Psychical Research89(3), 249-264. 

Kent, A., & Waller, G. (1998). The impact of childhood emotional abuse: An extension of the 

child abuse and trauma Scale. Child Abuse & Neglect22(5), 393-399. 

Lawrence,  T.  R.,  Edwards,  C.,  Barraclough,  N.,  Church,  S.,  &  Hetherington,  F.  (1995). 

Modelling childhood causes of paranormal belief and experience: Childhood trauma and 

childhood fantasy. Personality and Individual Differences19(2), 209-215. 

Lindeman,  M.,  &  Aarnio,  K.  (2006).  Paranormal  beliefs:  their  dimensionality  and  correlates. 

European Journal of Personality20(7), 582-602. 

McCreery, C., & Claridge, G. (1995). Out-of-the-Body Experiences and personality. Journal of 



the Society for Psychical Research60, 129-129. 

Perkins,  S.  L.,  &  Allen,  R.  (2006).  Childhood  physical  abuse  and  differential  development  of 

paranormal belief systems. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease194(5), 349-355. 

Rabeyron, T. (2006). Approche psychodynamique et psychopathologique des experiences vécues 



comme "paranormales". Unpublished graduate dissertation, Lyon: Lyon II University. 

Rawlings, D. (2001). An exploratory factor analysis of Hartmann's Boundary Questionnaire and 

an  empirically-derived  short  version.  Imagination,  Cognition  and  Personality,  21(2), 

131-144. 

Ross, C., & Joshi, S. (1992). Paranormal experiences in the general population.  The Journal of 

Nervous and Mental Disease180(6), 357-361. 

Sanders,  B.,  &  Becker-Lausen,  E.  (1995).  The  measurement  of  psychological  maltreatment: 

Early data on the child abuse and trauma scale. Child Abuse & Neglect19(3), 315-323. 



16 

 

 



Sarason,  I.  G.,  Johnson,  J.  H.,  &  Siegel,  J.  M.  (1978).  Assessing  the  impact  of  life  changes: 

Development  of  the  Life  Experiences  Survey.  Journal  of  Consulting  and  Clinical 



Psychology46(5), 932-946. 

Schofield, K., & Claridge, G. (2007). Paranormal experiences and mental health: Schizotypy as 

an underlying factor, Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 1908-1916. 

Stewart,  A.  L.,  Ware,  J.  E.,  Sherbourne,  C.  D.,  &  Wells,  K.  B.  (1992).  Psychological 



distress/well-being  and  cognitive  Functioning  Measures.  Durham:  Duke  University 

Press. 


Thalbourne, M. A. (2000). Transliminality: A review. International Journal of Parapsychology

11(2), 1–34. 

Thalbourne,  M.  A.,  &  French,  C.  C.  (1995).  Paranormal  belief,  manic-depressiveness,  and 

magical ideation: a replication. Personality and Individual Differences18(2), 291-292. 

Thalbourne, M. A., Houran, J., & Crawley, S. (2003). Childhood trauma as a possible antecedent 

of transliminality. Psychological Reports93, 687-694. 

Tobacyk, J. J., & Wilkinson, L. V. (1990). Magical thinking and paranormal beliefs. Journal of 



Social Behaviour and Personality5, 255-264. 

Watt, C., Watson, S., & Wilson, L. (2007). Cognitive and psychological mediators of anxiety: 

Evidence from a study of paranormal belief and perceived childhood control. Personality 

and Individual Differences42(2), 335-343. 

Wilson,  S.  C.,  &  Barber,  T.  (1983).  The  Fantasy-Prone  Personality:  Implications  for 

understanding imagery, hypnosis, and parapsychological phenomena. in Imagery:Current 

Theory, Research, and Application: Current Theory, Research and Application (p. 340). 

New York: Wiley. 

Windholz,  G.,  &  Diamant,  L.  (1974).  Some  personality  traits  of  believers  in  extraordinary 

phenomena. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society3, 125-126 .

 



17 

 

 



 

Table 1 

Descriptive statistics for all variable

 

Scales and subscales 



Mean 


SD 

Possible range 

Alpha 

1. Anomalous Experiences Inventory (AEI) 

 

 



 

 

 



a. Paranormal Experiences 

162 


6.16 

4.49 


0 - 28 

0.84 


b. Extra-Sensory Perception subscale 

162 


3.12 

2.37 


0 - 11 

0.76 


c. Encounter subscale 

162 


1.09 

1.69 


0 - 10 

0.76 


d. Poltergeist subscale 

162 


0.72 

1.19 


0 - 8 

0.73 


e. Paranormal Belief 

162 


5.93 

6.64 


0 - 12 

0.82 


f. Paranormal Ability 

162 


1.33 

2.06 


0 - 16 

0.78 


g. Paranormal Fear 

162 


1.65 

1.75 


0 - 6 

0.76 


 

 

 



 

 

 



2. Short Boundary Questionnaire (BQ-Sh) 

162 


79.56 

17.46 


0 - 160 

0.87 


a. Unusual experiences 

162 


17.14 

9.01 


0 - 48 

0.82 


b. Need for order 

162 


27.90 

9.30 


0 - 48 

0.85 


c. Trust 

162 


12.52 

4.19 


0 - 24 

0.68 


d. Perceived Competence 

162 


16.75 

5.39 


0 - 36 

0.75 


e. Childlikeness 

162 


12.91 

3.92 


0 - 20 

0.75 


f. Sensibility 

162 


4.80 

2.11 


0 - 8 

0.84 


 

 

 



 

 

 



3. Mental Health Inventory (MH-17I) 

162 


67.80 

15.46 


0 - 100 

0.84 


c. Anxiety 

162 


34.66 

20.39 


0 - 100 

0.82 


d. Depression 

162 


27.75 

18.84 


0 - 100 

0.75 


e. Behavioral Control 

162 


28.67 

18.25 


0 - 100 

0.77 


f. General Positive 

162 


61.27 

17.52 


0 - 100 

0.83 


g. Emotional ties 

162 


67.28 

25.68 


0 - 100 

0.78 


 

 

 



 

 

 



4. Children Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS) 

162 


0.81 

0,46 


0 - 4 

0.82 


a. Negligence 

162 


0.90 

0,62 


0 - 4 

0.76 


b. Sexual Abuse 

162 


0.10 

0,27 


0 - 4 

0.78 


c. Punishment 

162 


1.32 

0,57 


0 - 4 

0.74 


d. Emotional 

162 


1.04 

0,73 


0 - 4 

0.80 


 

 

 



 

 

 



5.  Life Experience Survey (LES) 

162 


13.32 

8.84 


0 - 282 

 

a. Positive life change 



162 

6.36 


6.05 

0 - 141 


n/a 

b. Negative life change 

162 

6.96 


6.18 

0 - 141 


n/a 

 

 



 

 

 



 

6. Priming and Retro-priming experiment 

 

 



 

 

 



a. Priming (logarithm) 

155 


0.12 

0.19 


n/a 

n/a 


b. Retro-Priming (logarithm) 

155 


0.01 

0.09 


n/a 

n/a 


 

 

 



 

 

 



7. Demographics 

 

 



 

 

 



a. Age (years) 

162 


28.68 

13.97 


18 - 76 

n/a 


b. Gender (female) 

162 


71% 

n/a 


n/a 

n/a 


c. Have already suffered from mental disorders 

162 


20.6% 

n/a 


n/a 

n/a 


d. Have already been in therapy 

162 


24.7% 

n/a 


n/a 

n/a 


e. Have had a paranormal Experience during last year 

162 


21.3 % 

n/a 


n/a 

n/a 


g. Important life event prior to paranormal experience 

34 


54.9% 

n/a 


n/a 

n/a 



18 

 

 



 

Table 2 

Spearman inter-correlations between main variables 

 

* P < 0.05 ; ** P < 0.01 (one tailed) 



Variable  







10 


11 

1. Paranormal Experience 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

2. ESP Subscale  



.88** 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

3.  Encounter Subscale 



.68** 

.57** 


 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



4. Poltergeist Subscale 

.73** 


.55** 

.64** 


 

 



 

 

 



 

 

5. Paranormal Belief 



.61** 

.45** 


51** 

.56** 


 

 



 

 

 



 

6. BQ-Sh  

.33** 

.30** 


31** 

.28** 


.31** 

 



 

 

 



 

7. MHI  


-.16* 

-.11 


-15* 

-.17* 


-.15* 

-.27** 


 

 



 

 

8. CATS 



.44** 

.41** 


.37** 

.37** 


.31** 

.24** 


-.35** 

 



 

 

9. Negative Life Change 



.29** 

.24** 


.21** 

.28** 


.25** 

.21** 


-.41** 

.24** 


 

 



10. Retro-priming (3.0) 

-.01 


.035 

-.01 


-.04 

.014 


.056 

-.01 


-.074 

-.073 


 

11. Priming (3.0) 



.15* 

.11 


.05 

.08 


.03 

.10 


-.01 

.11 


.20** 

-.04 





19 

 

 



Table 3 

Differences between paranormal experience groups 

  

* P  <  0.05 ; ** P <  0.01 ; *** P  <  0.001 



Scales 

P- 


P+ 

Mean 


SD 



BQ-Sh - Total 

70.45 

94.00 


80.60 

17.40 


2318 

-3.19 


-.25*** 

BQ-Sh - Unusual Experience 

68.26 

96.49 


17.19 

9.05 


2129 

-3.83 


-.30*** 

BQ-Sh - Need for Order 

81.43 

81.58 


29.11 

8.90 


3262 

-0.20 


- 0.01 

BQ-Sh - Perceived Competency 

79.32 

83.97 


16.54 

5.45 


3080,5 

-0.63 


- 0.05 

BQ-Sh - Trust 

82.86 

76.96 


12.52 

4.19 


3151 

-0.39 


- 0.03 

BQ-Sh - 


childlikeness

 

70.86 



93.54 

12.96 


3.87 

2353 


-3.08 

- 0.24** 

BQ-Sh - Sensibility 

77.92 


85.55 

4.81 


2.11 

2960 


-1.04 

- 0.08 


MHI - Total 

85.05 


77.49 

67.80 


15.46 

2963 


-1.02 

- 0.08 


MHI - Anxiety 

81.30 


81.73 

34.66 


20.38 

3250,5 


- 0.06 

- 0.00 


MHI - Depression 

79.60 


83.65 

27.75 


18.84 

3104,5 


- 0.55 

- 0.04 


MHI - Behavioral Control 

79.69 


83.55 

23.61 


18.25 

3112.5 


- 0.53 

- 0.04 


MHI - General Positive 

82.14 


80.78 

61.26 


17.52 

3213 


- 0.18 

- 0.01 


MHI - Emotional Ties 

87.68 


74.51 

67.28 


25.68 

2736.5 


- 1.84 

- 0.14 


CATS - Total 

64.67 


100.55 

30.33 


17.40 

1820.5 


- 4.86 

- 0.38*** 

CATS - Negligence abuse 

67.49 


97.35 

12.56 


8.73 

2063.5 


- 4.05 

- 0.32*** 

CATS - Sexual abuse 

74.66 


89.24 

0.59 


1.64 

2680 


- 2.88 

- 0.22** 

CATS - Punishment abuse 

72.07 


92.17 

7.89 


3.42 

2457 


- 2.74 

- 0.21** 

CATS - Emotional abuse 

64.08 


101.21 

7.30 


5.12 

1770 


- 5.04 

- 0.39*** 

LES – Negative 

71.12 


93.24 

6.15 


6.05 

2375.5 


-3.01 

-.24** 


Retro-priming 

80.12 


75.68 

0.01 


0.09 

2825.5 


-.61 

-.05 


Priming 

75.80 


80.41 

0.11 


0.23 

2818.5 


-.64 

-.05 



20 

 

 



 


Yüklə 172,38 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə