Investigating the Relationship Between Exposure to Television Programs that Depict Paranormal



Yüklə 199,07 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə5/7
tarix13.11.2017
ölçüsü199,07 Kb.
#10230
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

The Measure of Paranormal Beliefs

After recoding the items that were negatively worded, we combined the scores

across the 20 items of paranormal beliefs to form an additive index. Cronbach’s

alpha on this index was .88. Evidence for the measure’s validity is indicated by the

fact that it was significantly correlated with the tendency for respondents to report

that they had experienced a paranormal event in their own life [r

ϭ .46, ϭ 190; Ͻ

.001]. Sparks, et al. (1997) found the same correlation (r

ϭ .47) in their study. In

order to determine if the structure of this measure was multi-dimensional, the 20

items were submitted to a maximum likelihood factor analysis with varimax

rotation. As observed by Sparks, et al. (1997), five factors emerged initially from this

analysis with eigenvalues greater than 1.0. However, in this case, the first factor

accounted for 30% of the variance and none of the remaining factors accounted for

at least 10% of the variance. Moreover, the items loading on this first factor were not

easily interpretable and the reliability of an additive index consisting of these items

(.60) failed to meet the conventional minimum established for alpha (.70). Conse-

quently, we decided to employ the entire 20-item measure as our main measure of

paranormal beliefs. It should be noted that the results of the factor analysis do

diverge somewhat from those obtained by Sparks, et al. (1997), who found an

interpretable, two-factor solution for this measure, both of which formed reliable

sub-scales.



The Measures of Television Viewing

Two measures of viewing were constructed from the responses. The first measure

was a “total viewing” measure in hours-per-week and is described above. Only six

respondents in the sample (3%) reported viewing no television at all during a typical

week. At the other extreme, one viewer reported viewing 74-hours of TV during a

typical week (10

ϩ hours per day). The median number of hours viewed per week

was 18, or about 2–3 hours-per-day. A second viewing measure was designed to

assess viewing of programs that were known to feature paranormal phenomena

regularly. The number of times that respondents indicated seeing each of the

programs was summed together to form a total measure for paranormal program-

ming.


Testing the Hypothesis and Research Questions

In order to test the first hypothesis, we initially computed correlations between the

measures of TV viewing and the measure of paranormal beliefs. The measure of

total TV viewing was significantly correlated with paranormal beliefs [r(190)

ϭ .19,

p

Ͻ .01]. Consistent with H1’s prediction that this relationship should be more likely

for the viewing of paranormal TV programs, we found that the measure of

paranormal TV viewing was significantly correlated with paranormal beliefs [r(191)

ϭ

.31, p



Ͻ .001]. Since the second research question sought information about the

impact of demographic variables on the relationship between TV exposure and

paranormal beliefs, we ran two regression equations to explore this issue— one for

each of the two viewing measures. The independent variables for each equation

were identical. Age, sex, income, education, weekly attendance at a religious service,

and intensity of religious belief were all entered into the equation in a single block.

This was followed by entering, in respective equations, either the total TV viewing

measure, or the measure of paranormal viewing. This permitted us to examine how

106

COMMUNICATION MONOGRAPHS




much variance in paranormal beliefs could be accounted for by TV viewing after

controlling for these demographic factors. Table 2 displays the results of the

equation using the total TV viewing measure as a predictor variable; Table 3

displays the results using the measure of paranormal viewing.

As Table 2 reveals, the demographic variables accounted for 16% of the variance

in paranormal beliefs [(6,175)

ϭ 5.56, Ͻ .001]. Total TV viewing accounted for

an additional 2% of the variance, but this was not enough to meet the conventional

level of significance [p

Ͻ .07]. The entire regression model accounted for 18% of the

variance in paranormal beliefs [(7,174)

ϭ 5.31, Ͻ .001]. The similar equation for

paranormal TV viewing (Table 3) shows that viewing of paranormal TV accounted

for an additional 4% of the variance in paranormal beliefs [p

Ͻ .003]. The entire

regression model accounted for 20% of the variance in paranormal beliefs [(7,175)

ϭ 6.16, Ͻ .001].

The equations in Tables 2 and 3 reveal information pertinent to RQ2. Age,

income, weekly attendance at a religious service, and intensity of religious belief

proved to be unrelated to paranormal beliefs. However, sex and education did

predict belief in the paranormal. The signs of the beta coefficients indicate that

females were more likely to express belief in the paranormal than were males and

people with lower levels of education were more likely to express belief than were

people with higher levels. The effect associated with education is much stronger than

the effect for sex.

TABLE 2


R

EGRESSION

R

ESULTS FOR



P

REDICTING

B

ELIEF IN THE



P

ARANORMAL FROM

T

OTAL


T

ELEVISION

V

IEWING


Variables Entered

Multiple R

R

2

Beta



Step 1:

Age


Ϫ.06

Sex


.17* ( p

Ͻ .05)


Income

.07


Education

Ϫ.32* (Ͻ .001)

Weekly Religious Service

Ϫ.13


Intensity of Religious Belief

.07


.40

.16


Step 2

Total TV Viewing

.42

.18


.13

Note. The entire regression model was significant [(7,174)

ϭ 5.31; Ͻ .001].

TABLE 3

R

EGRESSION



R

ESULTS FOR

P

REDICTING



B

ELIEF IN THE

P

ARANORMAL FROM



P

ARANORMAL

V

IEWING


Variables Entered

Multiple R

R

2

Beta



Step 1:

Age


Ϫ.07

Sex


.17* ( p

Ͻ .05)


Income

.07


Education

Ϫ.31* (Ͻ .001)

Weekly Religious Service

Ϫ.12


Intensity of Religious Belief

.07


.39

.15


Step 2

Viewing Paranormal

.45

.20


.22* ( p

Ͻ .003)


Note. The entire regression model was significant [(7,175)

ϭ 6.16; Ͻ .001]. The betas for Step 1 are slightly

different than the ones listed in Table 1 due to the fact that one respondent had missing data for the analysis in

Table 1 and was not included in the analysis.

107

TELEVISION AND PARANORMAL BELIEFS




Yüklə 199,07 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə