K-4 Proof of Concept unit draft docx



Yüklə 172,12 Kb.
tarix08.03.2018
ölçüsü172,12 Kb.

Fairfax County public schools - Social Studies – C3 Inquiry Lesson for World history I

World History and Geography I Inquiry (230-270 Minutes)


What Made Africa, Africa?

Ancient map showing the trans-Saharan trade route and the journeys of Mansa Musa.

In the public domain: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ACatalan_Atlas_BNF_Sheet_6_Western_Sahara.jpg


Supporting Questions- These are used to structure and develop the inquiry



  1. How did regional interactions influence the development of African civilizations?

  2. What were the geographic factors that influenced where African civilization developed?

  3. How did natural resources influence the economic systems of African civilizations?






Designed by Samantha Reynolds & Craig Perrier



What Made Africa, Africa?

VA SOL Content Standard


WHI.12 The student will apply social science skills to understand the civilizations and empires of Africa, with emphasis on the African kingdoms of Axum and Zimbabwe and the West African civilizations of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai.

VA SOL Skills Standard 1

1a – Planning Inquiries, 1b- using Geographic Information, 1c – Comparing and Contrasting,

1e – Constructing Arguments, 1f- how Cause and Effect Relationships Impact People, 1g – Taking Action, 1j – Communicating Conclusions

Portrait of a Graduate Correlations



Introducing the Question

HOOK: Students view images of Timbuktu ancient, and today. Students select images (one past, and one present image) and create a concept web with a brief explanation of as many of the characteristics of civilization that they can recognize within the image. Each student will then create a change over time statement.




  • Supporting Questions - These are Used to Structure and Develop the Inquiry




Supporting Question 1




Supporting Question 2




Supporting Question 3

How did regional interactions influence the development of African civilizations?





What were the geographic factors that influenced where African civilizations developed?




How did natural resources influence the economic systems of African civilizations?

Formative
Performance Task





Formative
Performance Task





Formative
Performance Task


The students will complete a chart on the development of social, political, economic, religious, and cultural patterns. The student’s will then JIGSAW and report to their home group.




Students complete a map of the climatic zones and geographic features of Africa and create a third layer of information blurbs explaining how the geographic features connect to where the civilizations developed.





Students debate whether they think that the gold-salt trade was beneficial or detrimental for the development of civilization in Africa, and why?

Featured Sources




Featured Sources




Featured Sources

A. Ghana, Mali, Songhai Resource

http://www.timemaps.com/civilization/African-kingdoms

B. Aksum



https://www.britannica.com/place/Aksum-ancient-kingdom-Africa

C. Zimbabwe



http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/29/travel/900-year-stone-great-zimbabwe/




A. Climate Zones in Africa

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/

education/pd/oceans_weather_climate/

media/climate_zones.swf

B. Ancient and Medieval African Kingdoms

Google "Trek Layer"





A. News Article

http://www.businessinsider.com/mansa-musa-the-richest-person-in-history-2016-2

B. Reference



http://www.africa.com/top-10-great-african-empires/

C. Primary and Secondary Essays/ Art



www. metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/

hd_gold.htm





Summative

Performance Tasks

ARGUMENT: Students will formulate a written opinion as to what they believe influenced the development of African civilizations. They will need to reference at least 3 of the 5 civilizations, and incorporate at least 3 of the artifacts from the formative performance task in their response.

EXTENSION: Have the students take their written response and create a blog post, vlog, or podcast.

Taking

Informed

Action

Have the students research the current states of Ghana and Mali and create an infographic/visual to show the continuity and change over time from the Kingdoms of Ghana and Mali to their current states. Then have the students share this information with their peer groups, school, or community.

Taking Informed Action: UN Sustainable Development Goals

The students will create a personal/professional social media account where they connect with students around the world to share their research on how the development of African civilization impacts the modern context of Africa. The students will review the UN Sustainable Development Goal #1 to learn about the intent and purpose of the goal. The students will purposefully start a twitter #chat geared around the topic with the goal of addressing how to eradicate poverty in Africa.

UN Sustainable Development Goal #1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.





Optional Background Resources


Websites:

  • www. Africa.com

  • http://nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/africa-resources/


General Types of Supports






Introducing the Compelling Question – The Hook (15-20 Minutes)

Compelling Question

What made Africa, Africa?

Featured Source(s)

A. Ancient Timbuktu

http://www.siliconafrica.com/terra-nullius/

B. Modern Images of Timbuktu



http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/119/video

Instructions/Process for Introducing The compelling question:

Students will view images of Ancient Timbuktu (Featured Source A), as well as modern Timbuktu (Featured Source B). The student will select images create a concept web with a brief explanation of as many of the characteristics of civilization that they can recognize within the image. A sample concept map is available in the Appendix. The characteristics of civilization are: government, religion, social structure, art, and architecture. Not all characteristics will be evident to the students in the images. The student will then create a change over time statement (Ex: From the Ancient Kingdom of Mali to the modern country of Mali the city of Timbuktu is similar in ___________________ and different in ___________________ this shows a change over time in ______________________________.)



Introducing the Compelling Question – Featured Sources

Featured Source (s)

A. Ancient Timbuktu

http://www.siliconafrica.com/terra-nullius/

This source includes drawings of people in Timbuktu, an Ancient Map, and views of the city. There are over 20 ancient images at this site for your reference.

B. Modern Images of Timbuktu



http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/119/video

This source is a video from UNESCO that shows what the modern images of the site/city of Timbuktu.

Student Generated Questions


It is important to have students involved in the inquiry process; because of this, ask students to share questions and curiosities they have regarding the compelling question. These questions can be recorded during the inquiry process.  Below are some suggested prompts to ask students.


  • What questions came up during class?

  • What are you wondering about?

  • What information do you (still) need to answer the compelling question?

  • How can you further your understanding of this topic?

  • Where can you access additional sources or information on this topic?

  • Who could be an additional resource for your inquiry?

Record student questions in a “parking lot” (on a poster, white board, google doc) so that the class can readily access them. Throughout the inquiry, return to these questions and, if possible, weave them into your instruction and formative assessment.  By intentionally soliciting and then addressing/using students questions, you develop their ability to ask questions, plan for future steps, and think about their thinking (metacognition).


NOTE: It is possible to use these students’ questions as the supporting questions for the inquiry.  If you do, you may need to make adjustments to your teaching and the resources identified for this inquiry.


Supporting Question 1 (45-60 Minutes)

Supporting
Question


How did regional interactions influence the development of African civilizations?


Formative Performance Task

The students will complete a chart on the development of social, political, economic, religious, and cultural patterns. The student’s will then JIGSAW and report to their home group.

Featured Source(s)

A. Ghana, Mali, Songhai Resource

http://www.timemaps.com/civilization/African-kingdoms

B. Aksum



https://www.britannica.com/place/Aksum-ancient-kingdom-Africa

C. Zimbabwe



http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/29/travel/900-year-stone-great-zimbabwe/

Process and Formative Performance Task


  • Divide your students into groups of 5.

  • Once your students are divided assign each group a kingdom Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Axum and Zimbabwe. Give the students access to the featured sources, and give them 20-30 minutes to collaboratively complete their graphic organizer.

  • Once the students have completed their graphic organizer assign each group member a number 1-6. This will be the jigsaw segment of the task. Then have the 1's, 2's etc. meet and share the information from their kingdom. This should take between 20-30 minutes.


Featured Sources


Featured Source A: Ghana, Mali and Songhai Resource

This link leads you to an interactive timeline of each of the Ancient and Medieval Kingdom. The timeline will provide the students with information and images.



http://www.timemaps.com/civilization/African-kingdoms

Featured Source B: Aksum Resource- Encyclopedia

https://www.britannica.com/place/Aksum-ancient-kingdom-Africa

Aksum, also spelled Axum, powerful kingdom in northern Ethiopia during the early Christian era.

Despite common belief to the contrary, Aksum did not originate from one of the Semitic Sabaean kingdoms of southern Arabia but instead developed as a local power. At its apogee (3rd–6th century ce), Aksum became the greatest market of northeastern Africa; its merchants traded as far as Alexandria and beyond the Nile River. Aksum continued to dominate the Red Sea coast until the end of the 9th century, exercising its influence from the shores of the Gulf of Aden to Zeila on the northern coast of Somaliland (modern Somalia and Djibouti).

During the 2nd and 3rd centuries ce its growth as a trading empire increasingly impinged on the power of the kingdom of Meroe, the fall of which was brought about in the 4th century by an Aksumite invasion. During the 4th century the kings of Aksum were Christianized—thus becoming both politically and religiously linked to Byzantine Egypt. At the same time, they extended their authority into southern Arabia. In the 6th century an Aksumite king reduced the Yemen to a state of vassalage. In the latter part of the 6th century, however, the Persians invaded South Arabia and brought Aksumite influence there to a close. Later the Mediterranean trade of Aksum was ended by the encroachment of the Arabs in the 7th and 8th centuries.

Gradually, Aksumite power shifted internally to the Agau (Agaw, or Agew) people, whose princes shaped a new Christian line in the Zagwe dynasty of the 12th–13th century.
Featured Source C: The Great Zimbabwe Resource- News Article and Images

http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/29/travel/900-year-stone-great-zimbabwe/
(CNN) -- Legend has it that this was once a playground for the giants -- and for visitors gazing over this steep hill in southern Zimbabwe it's easy to understand why.

Spread around in every direction, great jumbled blocks of granite rise from the ground to create spectacular rock formations, their fantastical shapes fashioned by centuries of wind and rain, of heat and cold. Stacked upon one another, such boulders are scattered haphazardly across the southern African country -- Zimbabwe is indeed home to one of Africa's most breathtaking landscapes.

Living here amongst the boulders, in the hills of Masvingo province, the Zimbabwean people are largely Shona. Sometimes known as Bantu, they form three quarters of the country's population.

Shona people first settled in the region more than 1,000

years ago and for centuries flourished in the region's lush green savannah plains. Central to their prosperity was the ancient town of Great Zimbabwe, the capital of a booming trading empire that flourished between the 11th and 15th centuries, extending over the gold-rich plateau in southern Africa.

Located some 30 kilometers from the modern Zimbabwean town of Masvingo, the stone ruins of Great Zimbabwe are today one of the continent's most impressive monuments, linking the present with the past.

According to UNESCO, the method of construction in Great Zimbabwe is unique in the continent's architecture and although there are cases of similar work elsewhere, none are as exceptional and imposing as here.

The first thing that draws the visitor's eye is the high level of craftsmanship that went into the construction of the site. Skillful stonemasons built massive dry-stone walls,

incorporating large natural boulders into some of the structures. Walls extend between rocky outcrops and massive rocks, forming a maze of narrow passageways and the enclosures.

The site extends over about 800 hectares and it can be divided into three main architectural zones. The Hill Complex is generally considered a royal site, and the Valley Ruins are a series of living spaces. But most impressive is the Great Enclosure, a spectacular circular monument made of cut granite blocks that was entirely built in curves. Its outer wall extends some 250 meters and it has a maximum height of 11 meters, making it the largest single pre-colonial structure in Africa south of the Sahara.

While trade kept the community prosperous, religious life was also rich at Great Zimbabwe, which had an estimated population of about 18,000 people in its heyday.

Although the stone city was largely abandoned around the 1450s, its cultural and historical significance didn't wane with the passing of centuries.



In fact, Great Zimbabwe became such an important part of the national identity that the country itself was named for this ancient city -- "Zimbabwe" derives from the Shona name for the historic town -- meaning "big houses of stone."


Sample graphic organizer.


Kingdom

Ghana

Mali

Songhai

Axum

Zimbabwe


Social Patterns
















Political Patterns
















Economic Patterns

















Religious Patterns

















Cultural Patterns
















Student Generated Questions


It is important to have students involved in the inquiry process; because of this, ask students to share questions and curiosities they have regarding the compelling question. These questions can be recorded during the inquiry process.  Below are some suggested prompts to ask students.


  • What questions came up during class?

  • What are you wondering about?

  • What information do you (still) need to answer the compelling question?

  • How can you further your understanding of this topic?

  • Where can you access additional sources or information on this topic?

  • Who could be an additional resource for your inquiry?

Record student questions in a “parking lot” (on a poster, white board, google doc) so that the class can readily access them. Throughout the inquiry, return to these questions and, if possible, weave them into your instruction and formative assessment.  By intentionally soliciting and then addressing/using students questions, you develop their ability to ask questions, plan for future steps, and think about their thinking (metacognition).


NOTE: It is possible to use these students’ questions as the supporting questions for the inquiry.  If you do, you may need to make adjustments to your teaching and the resources identified for this inquiry.

Additional Support/Scaffolds/Extensions


Students could utilize Africa.com or National Geographic (http://www.nationalgeographic.com) for more information on the Ancient and Medieval Kingdoms.

Supporting Question 2 (45-60 Minutes)

Supporting
Question


What were the geographic factors that influenced where African civilizations developed?


Formative Performance Task

Students complete a map of the climatic zones and geographic features of Africa and create a third layer of information blurbs explaining how the geographic features connect to where the civilizations developed.


Featured Source(s)

A. Climate Zones in Africa

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/

education/pd/oceans_weather_climate/

media/climate_zones.swf

B. Ancient and Medieval African Kingdoms

Google "Trek" Layer

Process and Formative Performance Task


  • Distribute the sample map to the students, or allow for them to create a map www.scribblemaps.com

  • Allow the students to work on the climatic zones of Africa Map for 10-20 minutes

  • Allow the students to work on the kingdom map for 10-20 minutes

  • Have the students share the maps with their peers.

  • Ask the students to brainstorm connections they can make between the climate zones and where kingdoms developed (in groups).

  • Have the students write down three reasons why they think that the civilizations (specify which civilization) developed where they did based on the climate and topography.

Featured Sources:


Featured Source A: Interactive Map of the Climatic Zones in Africa

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/pd/oceans_weather_climate/media/climate_zones.swf

This is the website for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Featured Source B: Early and Medieval African Kingdoms Google Trek Map

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1kO5xA99yToRaTkvqW9wrPktZOXc&hl=en

This map will provide students with locations and images of the Kingdoms.

Sample Map:




Additional Support/Scaffolds/Options


Further research could be done at the following website:

http://www.mapsofworld.com/africa/


Student Generated Questions


It is important to have students involved in the inquiry process; because of this, ask students to share questions and curiosities they have regarding the compelling question. These questions can be recorded during the inquiry process.  Below are some suggested prompts to ask students.


  • What questions came up during class?

  • What are you wondering about?

  • What information do you (still) need to answer the compelling question?

  • How can you further your understanding of this topic?

  • Where can you access additional sources or information on this topic?

  • Who could be an additional resource for your inquiry?

Record student questions in a “parking lot” (on a poster, white board, google doc) so that the class can readily access them. Throughout the inquiry, return to these questions and, if possible, weave them into your instruction and formative assessment.  By intentionally soliciting and then addressing/using students questions, you develop their ability to ask questions, plan for future steps, and think about their thinking (metacognition).


NOTE: It is possible to use these students’ questions as the supporting questions for the inquiry.  If you do, you may need to make adjustments to your teaching and the resources identified for this inquiry.


Supporting Question 3 (45- 60 Minutes)

Supporting
Question


How did natural resources influence the economic systems of African civilizations?

Formative Performance Task

Students debate whether they think that the gold-salt trade was beneficial or detrimental for the development of civilization in Africa, and why?

Featured Source(s)

A. News Article

http://www.businessinsider.com/mansa-musa-the-richest-person-in-history-2016-2

B. Reference



http://www.africa.com/top-10-great-african-empires/

C. Primary and Secondary Essays/ Art



www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/hd_gold.htm



Formative Performance Task and Instructional Approach


1. Divide the class into four groups, two groups will debate for the beneficial side, two groups will debate the detrimental side.

2.          The members of each of the role group will need to research whether the Gold Salt trade was beneficial or detrimental to African civilization.

3.          After research has been completed, each role group will state its position on the topic. The groups should then debate the topic from the point of view of their position (beneficial or detrimental).There should be two groups debating at the same time.

4.          After all the debates are finished, class members should discuss which opinion they agree with and explain why in writing.


Featured Sources:


Featured Source A: Article on Mansa Musa as the Richest Man Who Ever Lived- Business Insider

http://www.businessinsider.com/mansa-musa-the-richest-person-in-history-2016-2

African King Musa Keita I is thought to be the richest person of all time — "richer than anyone could describe," reports Time. Literally. His fortune was incomprehensible, Time's Jacob Davidson writes: "There's really no way to put an accurate number on his wealth. "He ruled the Mali Empire in the 14th century and his land was laden with lucrative natural resources, most notably gold." His vast wealth was only one piece of his rich legacy," reports Jessica Smith in a TED-Ed original lesson. Read on to learn more about the legendary king and see what it was really like to be the richest person in history:


Featured Source B: This source features a website with interactive blurbs, videos and photos and information on the 10 Great Ancient and Medieval African Kingdoms.

http://www.africa.com/top-10-great-african-empires/

Featured Source C: Metropolitan Museum of Art Primary and Secondary Sources on the Gold Salt Trade

www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gold/hd_gold.htm

*Primary Essays, Secondary Essays, Maps and Chronology are on the sidebar on the right of the link for additional resources

Gold Trade and the Kingdom of Ancient Ghana

Around the fifth century, thanks to the availability of the camel, Berber-speaking people began crossing the Sahara Desert. From the eighth century onward, annual trade caravans followed routes later described by Arabic authors with minute attention to detail. Gold, sought from the western and central Sudan, was the main commodity of the trans-Saharan trade. The traffic in gold was spurred by the demand for and supply of coinage. The rise of the Soninke empire of Ghana appears to be related to the beginnings of the trans-Saharan gold trade in the fifth century.

From the seventh to the eleventh century, trans-Saharan trade linked the Mediterranean economies that demanded gold—and could supply salt—to the sub-Saharan economies, where gold was abundant. Although local supply of salt was sufficient in sub-Saharan Africa, the consumption of Saharan salt was promoted for trade purposes. In the eighth and ninth centuries, Arab merchants operating in southern Moroccan towns such as Sijilmasa bought gold from the Berbers, and financed more caravans. These commercial transactions encouraged further conversion of the Berbers to Islam. Increased demand for gold in the North Islamic states, which sought the raw metal for minting, prompted scholarly attention to Mali and Ghana, the latter referred to as the “Land of Gold.” For instance, geographer al-Bakri described the eleventh-century court at Kumbi Saleh, where he saw gold-embroidered caps, golden saddles, shields and swords mounted with gold, and dogs’ collars adorned with gold and silver. The Soninke managed to keep the source of their gold (the Bambuk mines, most notably) secret from Muslim traders. Yet gold production and trade were important activities that undoubtedly mobilized hundreds of thousands of African people. Leaders of the ancient kingdom of Ghana accumulated wealth by keeping the core of pure metal, leaving the unworked native gold to be marketed by their people.
Gold Trade and the Mali Empire

By 1050 A.D., Ghana was strong enough to assume control of the Islamic Berber town of Audaghost. By the end of the twelfth century, however, Ghana had lost its domination of the western Sudan gold trade. Trans-Saharan routes began to bypass Audaghost, expanding instead toward the newly opened Bure goldfield. Soso, the southern chiefdom of the Soninke, gained control of Ghana as well as the Malinke, the latter eventually liberated by Sundiata Keita, who founded the Mali empire. Mali rulers did not encourage gold producers to convert to Islam, since prospecting and production of the metal traditionally depended on a number of beliefs and magical practices that were alien to Islam. In the fourteenth century, cowrie shells were introduced from the eastern coast as local currency, but gold and salt remained the principal mediums of long-distance trade.

The flow of sub-Saharan gold to the northeast probably occurred in a steady but small stream. Mansa Musa’s arrival in Cairo carrying a ton of the metal (1324–25) caused the market in gold to crash, suggesting that the average supply was not as great. Undoubtedly, some of this African gold was also used in Western gold coins. African gold was indeed so famous worldwide that a Spanish map of 1375 represents the king of Mali holding a gold nugget (Bibliothèque nationale de France). When Mossi raids destroyed the Mali empire, the rising Songhai empire relied on the same resources. Gold remained the principal product in the trans-Saharan trade, followed by kola nuts and slaves. The Moroccan scholar Leo Africanus, who visited Songhai in 1510 and 1513, observed that the governor of Timbuktu owned many articles of gold, and that the coin of Timbuktu was made of gold without any stamp or superscription.

Student Generated Questions


 It is important to have students involved in the inquiry process; because of this, ask students to share questions and curiosities they have regarding the compelling question. These questions can be recorded during the inquiry process.  Below are some suggested prompts to ask students.

  • What questions came up during class?

  • What are you wondering about?

  • What information do you (still) need to answer the compelling question?

  • How can you further your understanding of this topic?

  • Where can you access additional sources or information on this topic?

  • Who could be an additional resource for your inquiry?

Record student questions in a “parking lot” (on a poster, white board, google doc) so that the class can readily access them. Throughout the inquiry, return to these questions and, if possible, weave them into your instruction and formative assessment.  By intentionally soliciting and then addressing/using students questions, you develop their ability to ask questions, plan for future steps, and think about their thinking (metacognition).


NOTE: It is possible to use these students’ questions as the supporting questions for the inquiry.  If you do, you may need to make adjustments to your teaching and the resources identified for this inquiry.

Additional Support/Scaffolds/Options


Additional support for how to run a debate can be found here:

https://www.facinghistory.org/resource-library/teaching-strategies/four-corners

An extension on this matter would be to have the students participate in a live dialogue online around their rationale. You can utilize Socrative for this endeavor.



http://www.socrative.com

Summative Performance Task

Summative Performance Task

ARGUMENT: Students will formulate a written opinion as to what they believe influenced the development of African civilization. They will need to reference the 3 of the 5 civilizations, and incorporate at least 3 of the artifacts from the formative performance task in their response.

**A sample rubric is provided in Appendix E

EXTENSION: Have the students take their written response and create a blog post, vlog, or podcast.

Description


Students can utilize the following sites to create their infographic, blog post, vlog or podcast.

  1. http://piktochart.com

  2. https://venngage.com/

  3. https://prezi.com

  4. https://weebly.com

  5. https://podbean.com



Taking Informed Action

Taking Informed
Action


Have the students research the current states of Ghana and Mali and create an infographic/visual to show the continuity and change over time from the Kingdoms of Ghana and Mali to their current states.

Change over time allows for students to reflect on the cause and effect relationships of policies and economic matters. An example of a change over time statement would be: The Ancient of Kingdom of ________ had _______ and the current state of ____________, which shows ___________. Then have the students share this information with their peer groups, school, or community.



DESCRIPTION/NOTE TO TEACHER: Taking informed action can manifest itself in a variety of forms and in a range of venues: Students may express action through discussions, debates, surveys, video productions, and the like; these actions may take place in the classroom, in the school, in the local community, across the state, and around the world.

Taking Globally Informed Action

Taking Globally Informed
Action


The students will create a personal/professional social media account where they connect with students around the world to share their research on how the development of African civilization impacts the modern context of Africa. The students will review the UN Sustainable Development Goal #1 to learn about the intent and purpose of the goal. The students will purposefully start a twitter #chat geared around the topic with the goal of addressing how to eradicate poverty in Africa.

UN Sustainable Development Goal #1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.




Directions:

  1. Have the students create a professional social media account. A professional account means that they do not have any social media pictures, or personal information shared.

  2. Allow the students to research the UN Sustainable Development Goal #1.

  3. Have the students create a #chat with hashtag to share their understandings of UN Sustainable Development Goal #1 in relation to their research on Africa.


Taking Informed Action: UN Sustainable Development Goals

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) outline “a supremely ambitious and transformational vision”  for humanity. These 17 goals, and their 169 targets, offer teachers and students an opportunity to frame their C3 Inquiry in a global context. By engaging classes with informed action that addresses the SDG, students nurture their global citizen competencies, disposition, and mindset.



Our decision to develop Informed Action tasks that are  globally minded highlight both  the benefits of social studies teaching and learning and addresses a gap in educational resources of this genre.

Ultimately, teachers who use a global scope better prepare students to navigate, understand, and act in a future that is increasingly complex and interconnected.

  • Twitter: @GlobalGoalsUN

  • Twitter: @SustDev


Appendix A: Sample Concept Map

Appendix B: Sample Debate Graphic Organizer

Reasons and Evidence Why the Gold- Salt Trade was Beneficial to the Development of African Civilizations (cite documents for evidence)


Reasons and Evidence Why the Gold- Salt Trade was Detrimental to the Development of African Civilizations (cite documents for evidence)







Appendix C: Sample Map of Africa



Appendix D: Sample Graphic Organizer of African Civilizations

Kingdom

Ghana

Mali

Songhai

Axum

Zimbabwe

Social Patterns

















Political Patterns

















Economic Patterns

















Religious Patterns

















Cultural Patterns
















Appendix E: Sample Assessment Rubric

Underdeveloped

Developing

Meets expectations

Exceeds expectations




Does not include written expression, required information missing; historically inaccurate


Includes some written expression, information missing, historically inaccurate


Includes well developed written expression and more specific details; some historical inaccuracy


Includes a well-articulated written product with reference to the required kingdoms and sources.


Product

Spelling and/or grammar errors are distracting to the reader  and/or not typed


3 errors in spelling or grammar
 


1-2 errors in spelling or grammar


Free of spelling and grammar errors J

 


Mechanics


Missing work cited page

4 or more MLA mistakes

1 source cited


Work cited page included

3 MLA mistakes

2 sources cited


Work cited page included

1-2 MLA mistakes



3 sources cited


Correctly cited all works in MLA format and has at least 4 or more sources cited


Works Cited Page


Total Points:__________out of ___________

1



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə