The application of Osborne Reynolds' theory of heat transfer to flow through a pipe



Yüklə 71,67 Kb.

tarix27.12.2017
ölçüsü71,67 Kb.


25

The  Application  o f  Osborne  Reynolds'  Theory  o f  Heat  Transfer  to

Flow  through  a  Pipe.

By  G.  I. 



T

a y l o r

Yarrow  Research  Professor.

(Received  July  15,  1930.)

In  a  recent  paper  Messrs.  Eagle  and  Ferguson*  describe  a  very  complete 

series  of  measurements  of  the  conditions  of  heat  transfer  between  a  brass 

tube  and  water  flowing  through  it.  They  base  the  discussion  of  their  results 

on  Osborne  Reynolds  theory  of  heat  transfer  according  to  which  there  is  a 

complete  analogy  between  the  transfer  of  heat  and  momentum  so  th at  if  a 

hot  sheet  is  moved  edgewise  through  a  fluid  the  distributions  of  temperature 

and  momentum  in  the  water  are  identical.  The  assumption  underlying  the 

theory is th at any portion  of the  fluid which comes sufficiently near the heated 

surface  to  be  moved  forward  with  the  speed  of  the  hot  surface  is  also  heated 

to  the  temperature of  th a t  surface,  or,  alternatively, a portion which  is  moved 

forward  at  a  fraction,  [3,  times  the  speed  of  the  plate  is  also  heated  through  a 

temperature  equal to  [3  times  the  difference  in  temperature  between  the  plate 

and  the  fluid.  In   this  manner  Reynolds’  theoretical  coefficientj  of  heat 

transfer, 

k

r , 

may  be  calculated.  The  observed  heat  transfer  coefficient  is 

represented by Messrs.  Eagle and Ferguson as 

k

0 

and their results are expressed 

in  the  form  F  — 

kr

/

k

0  where  F  is  a  fraction  determined  under  a  variety  of 

different  conditions  of  experiment.

This crude  form  of  Reynolds’  theory  suffers  from  two  possible  main  sources 

of  error,  (A)  the  heated  surface  may  raise  the  velocity  of  any  portion  of  the 

fluid  near  it  through  a  greater  fraction  of  its  own  velocity  than  it  raises  the 

temperature expressed as a fraction of its own temperature, the initial tempera­

ture  of  the  fluid  being  taken  as  zero.  This  might  be  expected  to  give  rise  to 

large errors  in cases  where  the  thermal  conductivity  is  specially low.  (B)  The 

effect  of  local  pressure  differences  which  are  inherent  in  all  turbulent  motion 

and alter the momentum of the fluid at any point without altering its tempera­

ture  is neglected.  The  essential  assumption  in  Reynolds’  theory  is  that  these 

local pressure differences have no  effect on the average  distribution of velocity.



*  ‘  Proc.  Roy.  Soc.,’  vol.  127,  p.  540  (1930).

t   The coefficient of heat transfer is defined as (heat flow per square centimetre)/(tempera- 

ture  difference  between  fluid  and  inside  surface  of  tube).

 on December 26, 2017

http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




Messrs.  Eagle  and  Ferguson  allow  for  (A)  by  expressing  F  in  the  form

F   =   « + p ( a - l ) + Y ( < r - l ) * ,  

(1)

26 


G.  I.  Taylor.

where 


a =  

\xsjc and  a, 

and y  are  the  same  for  all fluids,  depending  only on 

Reynolds’  number  x

  =  


pvd/ p.

 

where  d



 

is  the  diameter  of  the  pipe  and  v

 

the 


velocity,  p  the  density of  the fluid,  y. is the  viscosity,  s the  specific heat  and c 

the  thermal  conductivity.  In  the  particular  case  when  cr =   1  which  is  not 

very far from the case for gases,  F  =  a.  In this case Reynolds’  expression for 

heat dissipation should be correct even although the effect of the laminar layer 

at  the  surface  is  taken  into  account,*  provided  (a)  Reynolds’  theory  is  true, 

and  ( 


b)

  the  theory  is  directly  applicable  to  the  conditions  of  Messrs.  Eagle 

and  Ferguson’s  experiment.  When  cr  =   1  therefore,  F  should  be  equal  to  1 

for  all  values  of 

t

 ;  so  that  a  should  be  equal  to  1  for  all  values  of 



and  or, 

and  the  fact  that  their  experiments  give  values  of  a  varying  from  1-04  for 



x

 

-> co  to  1-48  for  log  



 3 • 7,  while  their  calculation  shows  that  a  =   8  =  

11/6  as 

t

-^ 0  leads  them  to  the  conclusion  that  “  when  turbulence  is  feeble 



the  thermal  resistance  of  the  fluid  is  much  larger  than  is  given  by  Reynolds’ 

theory.”


This  result  is  in  contradiction  to  other  recent  experiments—particularly 

those  of  Sir  Thomas  Stanton  who  found  in  his  experiments  with  a  flat  ring- 

shaped  surface that  for  air  F  is  less  than  1  even  when  the  maximum  possible 

allowance has  been  made  for conditions  in  the  laminar layer.



Discussion of Messrs.  Eagle and Ferguson’s Experiments.

I t  seems  that  even  if  Reynolds’  theory  is  true  there  are  two  reasons,  con­

nected  with  the  experimental  conditions  under  which  Messrs.  Eagle  and  Fer­

guson’s  experiments  were  carried  out,  why  they  should  not  obtain  experi­

mentally the value a =   1, so that their conclusion that “ the thermal  resistance 

is much larger than  is  given  by  Reynolds’  theory, ”  cannot  be  accepted  as  a 

result of  their  experiments.  These  two  reasons  are :—

(A)  The  experiments  were  carried  out  under  conditions  to  which  Reynolds’ 

theory  is  not  directly  applicable.  In  order that  a  complete  analogy between 

the  transfer  of  heat  and  of  momentum  may  exist,  not  only  must  heat  and 

momentum  be  transferred  from  layer  to  layer  through  the  fluid  by  the  same 

masses of fluid,  but the rates at which heat and momentum are communicated 

to  portions  of  the  fluid  by  external  agencies  must  be  related  to  one  another. 

In  the case of  flow  under  pressure  through  a  heated  pipe  momentum  is  being 



*  I t  should  even  be  true  for  the  case  of  steady  viscous  flow.

 on December 26, 2017

http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




H eat Transfer  to  Flow  through  a  Pipe.

communicated  at  a  uniform  rate  throughout  the  fluid,  while  heat  in  Messrs. 

Eagle and Ferguson’s experiments was communicated to the fluid only through 

the  walls.  In  order  th at  Reynolds’  theory  may  be  applicable  to  flow  under 

pressure  through  a  pipe  the  heat  must  be  communicated  uniformly  through 

the mass.  Such  a condition could,  of course,  be realised,  at any rate theoreti­

cally,  by  using  a  conducting  fluid  passing  through  a  tube  which  was  a  con­

ductor  of  heat  but  a  non-conductor  of  electricity.  A  heating  current  passing 

through this fluid would supply the heat  in the correct manner if the tempera­

ture  of  the  tube  were  maintained  constant  throughout  its  length.

(B)  Even  if  Reynolds’  theory  could  be  directly  applied  to  the  conditions  of 

heating  used  by  Messrs.  Eagle  and  Ferguson their  method  of  measuring  mean 

temperature at any  section of the pipe is such th a t Reynolds’ theory could not 

be applied to their results.  They allow the heated water to flo w into a chamber 

where,  presumably,  complete  mixture  takes  place.  Taking  the  temperature 

of  the  walls  as  zero,  if  0  is  the  temperature  at  any  radius,  their  mean  is

fyw  —

a?ur

[  udrdr  where  u  is  the  velocity  at  radius  r  and  um  is  the mean

velocity.  In  cases like th a t of flow through  a pipe where  0  and u rise  and fall 

together this is greater than the true mean temperature over the section,  which 

2  f“

is  0TO =   —  J  Qrdr.  In  cases to  which  Reynolds’  theory  applies  0  and  u  are



everywhere  proportional  to  one  another  so  th a t  the  mean  temperature  must 

be  obtained  in  the  same  way  as  the  mean  velocity.  The  mean  velocity  is



um 

 ~5 

ur(l'r so th at  um is comparable  with  0TO and  not with  0M. 

a   Jo

Case of Viscous Flotv.

In  the  case  of  viscous  flow  for  which  the  heat  transfer  values  are  readily 

calculable  it  is  possible  to  calculate  the  value  of  oc  which  would  be  found  in 

experiments  conducted  by  the  methods  of  Messrs.  Eagle  and  Ferguson,  in 

fact  they  have  already  done  so.  They  find  F  =  a -f-  (3 (1 — a)  +  y (1  — a)2 

=   llcr/6 so th at a =   11/6,  (3  =   11 /6, y =  0.  If  0X and ux are the temperature 

and  velocity  of  the  fluid  at  the  centre  of  the  pipe,  I  find  0TO/0i =  4/9,  0M/0] 

=   11/18,  umlu1 



 F =   3cr/2  (0m/0i)  (% AO,  so  th at  if  0W had  been  used 

instead  of  0M it  would  have  been  found  th at  F =   3/2  (2)  (4/9)c =   4a/3,  so 

that  the  use  of  0M instead  of  0m  raises  a  in the  ratio  11:8.

If  the  experiment  had  been  conducted  in  such  a  manner  that  Reynolds’ 

theory  is  directly  applicable,  i.e.,  the  heating  had  been  by  an  electric  current

 on December 26, 2017

http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




28

G.  I.  Taylor.

through  the  fluid  instead  of  through  the  containing  tube,  then  it  is  a  simple



^

matter  to  show  that  F =  



<7 

~

 

— ,  and in  this  case  0m =  |G1;  while  urn =

so  that,  and  for  this  case, a  =   [3  =   1,  y =  0.  In  the  case  of  viscous  motion 

at  any  rate,  experiments  carried  out  in  such  a  manner that  Reynolds’  theory 

is  directly  applicable  would  therefore  yield  the  result  that  a =   1,  and  the 

heat  dissipated  would  be  exactly  the  amount  given  by  Reynolds’  expression. 

The difference  between heat dissipated in Messrs.  Eagle and Ferguson’s experi­

ments  and  that  calculated  by  Reynolds’  expression  are  therefore  entirely 

accounted  for  at  low  values  of  r,  by  the  incorrect  application  of  Reynolds’* 

theory  and  by  their  method  of  estimating  the  average  temperature  of  water 

which  is  not  that  contemplated  in  Reynolds’  theory.

Application  of Reynolds’  Theory for Higher  Values of Reynolds’

Number.

Though  it  is  not  possible to  apply  Reynolds’  theory  directly to  experiments 

conducted on the manner of Messrs.  Eagle  and Ferguson because the heat and 

momentum transfer  are  not  proportional to  one  another,  it  seems  worth while 

to  calculate  what  heat  transference  might  be  expected  in  such  experiments 

if  it  is  assumed  that



_

^  00



m

(

2

)

where  S  is  the  specific  heat,  m  is  the  rate  of  momentum  transfer  across  unit 

area and h the heat transfer,  h and m are both functions of r,  the distance from 

the centre of the tube.  This formula (2) is the form which expresses Reynolds’ 

theory  when  the  additional  assumption  is  made  that  the  “ mixture  length ” 

is  small  compared  with  the  radius  of  the  tube.  The   mixture  length  ”  is 

in  this  case the  radial  distance  through  which  any  portion  of  air  preserves  its 

temperature  and momentum till it  mixes with  its surroundings.

The  equation  of  motion  for  fluid  flowing  under  a  pressure  gradient  P  in  a 

circular  pipe  is

^   (rm)  =   P. 

(3)

or

The equation for heat flow under the conditions of Messrs. Eagle and Ferguson s



*  It  seems  that  Reynolds  himself  hardly  recognised  the  error  involved  in  applying  his 

theory  to  the  case  of  pressure  flow  through  pipes.

 on December 26, 2017

http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




H eat  Transfer  to  Flow  through  a  P ipe

29

experiments  in  which  the  temperature  rises  at  a  uniform  rate  of g



 

degrees  per 

centimetre  of  pipe  is

^  {rh)  =  p 

(4)

integrating  (3),



integrating  (4),

which can be put  in the  form



m  — A Pr;

sg



rr

urd

Jo

h



gsuxr

_     f  / 



rdr.

Jo 

\U]_/

We  may apply  (5)  to  find the  rate  of heat transfer at  any radius when the  dis­

tribution  of  velocity across the section of  the pipe  is  known.  Taking  the  case 

given  by  Stanton*  of  a  stream  of  air flowing through  a  pipe  7 • 4  cm.  diameter 

with  velocity 

ux —  2215  cm.  per  second  at  the  centre,  corresponding  values 

of rja and u\ux are given in columns  1  and 2 of Table I.  From these the values 

of  hKpgsu-g)  were  calculated  by means  of  (5)  and these  are  given in column  3.

Table  I.



1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

r

u

h

f  



du

e

a

%'

pgsuxr

J  

pgsuxr  ux

0 0

1-000

0-500

0-000

1-000

0-1

0-995

0-499

0-00250

0-9941

0-2

0-982

0-497

0-00898

0-9790

0-3

0-966

0-492

0-01684

0-9614

0-4

0-944

0-487

0-02756

0-9353

0-5

0-916

0-479

0-04098

0-9040

0-6

0-882

0-470

0-05696

0-8665

0-7

0-844

0-460

0-07444

0-8255

0-8

0-794

0-448

0-09684

0-7730

0-85

0-764

0-441

0-11007

0-7419

0-9

0-722

0-434

0-12829

0-6990

0-95

0-664

0-424

0-15291

0-6435

0-98

0-596

0-418

0-18131

0-5750

0-99

0-548

0-415

0-20123

0-5285

1 0 0

0

0-411

0-42643

0

So  far  no  use  has  been  made  of  Reynolds’  theory.  Substituting  |P r   for  m 

in  (2)  the  connection  between  0  and  r

 

is



9 6     2  9 

/gv

9r 


sPr  9

*  “ The  mechanical  viscosity  of  fluids,”  ‘  Proc.  Roy.  Soc.,’  A,  vol.  85,  p.  367  (1911).

 on December 26, 2017

http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 




30

Heat  Transfer  to  Flow  through  a  Pipe.

Hence


or

e -e ,-le g a !

P  JM

l  p 


gsu\uj

(7)


The  values  of  the  integral  in  (7)  can  be  found  from  the  figures  in  columns  2 

and  3  of  Table  I.  I t  is  given in column  4.  If  0  is  the  amount  by  which the 

temperature  at  radius  r  exceeds  that  of  the  inner  surface  of  the  wall  of  the 

pipe  at  the  same  section,  and  0X is  the  value  of  0  at  the  centre  of  the  pipe, 

0/0],  can  be  found  by  dividing  the  figures  in  column  4  by  0-4264  and 

subtracting  the  result  from  unity.  These  are  given  in  column  5.  If  H  is 

the  rate  of  heat  transfer  at  the  surface  and  R  the  friction  R  =  |P   and 

RKpgsup)  =  0-411  (see last figure  column 3,  Table I) hence

(see  last  figure,  column  4).  Hence

M  —  ^

— 0-964 


(81

0-4264 



ux ux  * 

(8)


It  now  remains to  evaluate  0M,  0TO and um from the figures given in Table I.

By  graphical  integration  I  find  0m =  0-801  01;  0M =  0-823  0X.  Hence

Hence  the  value  for  a  which  this  application  of  Reynolds’  theory  would  lead 

one to expect in Messrs.  Eagle and Ferguson’s experiment is  (0-963)"1 =   1-04.

The observed value of a for 

t

 =  105 (corresponding with the value appropriate 



to  Stanton’s  measurement) is given in their table  as  1-075.  I t  appears,  there­

fore,  that for this value of 

t

 a more complete application of Reynolds’  theory is 



capable  of  accounting  for  4  out  of  the  7J  per  cent,  by  which  their  observed 

value  of the heat transfer falls  short  of that given  by the  crude  application  of 

Reynolds’  formula.

but


0!  =  

(0-4264)


*  See  last  figure,  column  3,  Table  I,

 on December 26, 2017

http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Downloaded from 





Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə