Emergingchange en 100820



Yüklə 138,58 Kb.

tarix26.11.2017
ölçüsü138,58 Kb.


Emerging Change and Transactional Analysis

The Keys to Hierarchical Dialogue

Madeleine Laugeri

Provisional Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst – O-PTSTA

laugeri@emergingchange.net

www.emergingchange.net

www.ltco.ch

1.

________________________________________________________



Summary 

2

2.



______________________________________________________

Introduction 

2

3.

__________________________________



Elements of the Psycho-dynamic Model 

3

3.1.



__________________________________________

Different organisational energies 

3

4.

_________________________________________



Planned or Emerging Change ? 

4

4.1.



_____________________________________________________

Planned Change 

4

4.1.1.


_________________________________________________

Vision contract 

5

4.1.2.


_________________________________________

Mission contract (Part A) 

5

4.2.


____________________________________________________

Emerging Change 

6

4.2.1.


____________________________________________

Cooperation contract 

6

4.2.2.


__________________________________________

Mission contract (Part B) 

7

4.3.


______________________________________________________

Constructivism 

7

4.4.


___________________________

The Winning Script – the successful Mission Contract 

8

5.

___________________



Presentation of the OK++ Emerging dialogue in Fox's diagram 

9

6.



____________________________________________

Scripts and dysfunctions 

10

6.1.


______________________________________________________

Losing script 1 

10

6.2.


______________________________________________________

Losing script 2 

11

7.

_______________________________________________



Intervention Strategy 

12

8.



______________________________________________________

Conclusion 

13

Published in



French 

les Actualités en Analyse Transactionnelle, nr 119, les Editions AT, July 2006

English  Growth and Change for Organizations, 1995 - 2006, ITAA, July 2006

Italian 


Rivista di AT e scienze umane Neopsyche, nr 7, Ananke Edizioni, Oktober 2009

New version, August 20

th

, 2010


la

yo

ut



 :

 w

w



w

.f

ab



ie

nb

al



li.

ne

t




1. Summary

This  article  is presenting  a psycho  dynamic  model called  the  Emerging  Change  and  used in 

the  Organisational  field  to  help  the  actors  understand  the  human  process  and  structure  the 

hierarchical dialogue. 

It describes three different levels of energy active in the organisation :

‣ Planned change,

‣ Emerging change,

‣ Constructivism.

These energies are dealt with through three fundamental contracts : 

‣ Vision contract,

‣ Mission contract (Part A and Part B),

‣ Cooperation contract.

The article  is based on a synthesis between a Constructivist model

1

 by Gelinas and Fortin and 



Berne's  Organisational  Theory

2

 using  the  diagram  described  by  Fox  in  his  article



3

.  With  the 

work already done  by Gelinas  and Fortin  I  was  able  to  develop  a diagram for  the  integration 

and  synergy  of  the  three  types  of  energy (Figure  1),  and  the  Three  Contracts  Methodology 

supporting a functional understanding of Berne's Theory of Organisations. 

The Emerging Change  concept provides a global  vision and a regulation of the Human Proc-

ess inside an organisation or a team,  leading  to  increased cooperation and performance. The 

Emerging  change  diagram  presenting  the  three  types of  change  forces  within  the  organisa-

tion  can  be  fitted  into Fox's  diagram  while  avoiding  a possible  confusion with  Berne's repre-

sentation of the organisational culture already using the Ego States. 

In this article,  italics are used  to  refer to the Emerging Change  terms and  capitals on  the  first 

letter  of  the  word  are  used  with  Transactional  Analysis  concepts,  for  which  a  definition  is 

given  in  the  end  text  notes.  When  some  concepts  are  common  to  the  two  disciplines,  like 

"Environment" and "Activity", it is the Transactional Analysis definition that will be used.

2. Introduction

Professional  reality as perceived by team members is not  automatically the  same as the  real-

ity  of  team  managers.  The  illusion  that  we  are  "in  the  same  boat"  and  "we  are  sailing  to-

gether towards a common objective" is sooner  or later  bound to  be  revealed.  This  revelation 

may happen  over  time or  suddenly in a stressful  period and often  generates a  crisis in an in-

dividual or in an entire team.

However,  the  manager  and  the  team  can  stand  together  and  make  their  actions  coherent 

when they develop  an on-going dialogue  and  discuss the  modes and content of their  interac-

tions. This formal  dialogue  process  ensures that  the  values,  feelings,  and  needs of  everyone 

are legitimately accounted for. 

I  observed that some  managers are trained  and motivated to manage  internal  objectives and 

to  prioritise  personal  recognition  rather  than  work  synergistically  with  their  peers  or  team 



 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  2

1

 Gelinas, Arthur & Fortin, Regent (1996) : The management of teachers continuous training in Quebec. Ennovation or the Emerging Change.



  Université du Québec, p.119. Article based on Maturana and Chekland's constructivist theories.

2

 Berne, Eric (1963) : Structure and Dynamics of Organisations and Groups. Grove Press.



3

 Fox, Elliott : Eric Berne's Theory of Organisations. TAJ nr 8, pp, 148 to 154.




members. Even if  their peers are  in the  same organisation they often hardly know each other 

and think that time spent together is time wasted.

At the  same  time,  managers complain  that  they do not  know how to handle  some  situations 

and feel  exposed.  They  hire  external  experts or  consultants  to  give  them  help  in  some  areas 

where peers and team members could help. 

I  also  observed  that  team  members  are  often  uninformed  about  strategic  directions  and  are 

forced to act in a self-centred way which  appears to others to be optimising locally while  sub-

optimising the larger structures.

These observations can be summarised in information terms. Information does not freely flow 

vertically  between different levels  in the  hierarchy of  the  organisation.  Nor  does  it  flow freely 

horizontally. When it does flow it is biased in favour  of the  source  of the  information.  The at-

tached work is designed to encourage two way unbiased information flow.

3. Elements of the Psycho-dynamic Model

Emerging  change  is  a systemic  tool  to  analyse  and  correct  organisational  human  processes. 

The  name  emerging  change  refers  to  the  global  human  process  through  which  the  strategic 

elements  of  an  organisation's  activity  can  be  aligned  on  the  strategic  elements  of  its  envi-

ronment to  create  optimum structure  cohesion. This means that  the  activity  put  in  place  will 

fulfil most rapidly and efficiently a request from the environment. 

Everyone in  all  the  various structures of  an  organisation is responsible  for  this process.  Only 

one  person  is  not bound  by it:  the  person in  charge  of  the  supreme  group authority because 

he / she has no peers.

3.1. Different organisational energies

Gelinas  &  Fortin  emphasize  a polarization  between  two 

active  energies

1

  in  the  organisational  complex  world. 



The  first  one,  relating  to the  management  of  the  Envi-

ronment


2

,  is  the  planned energy  and  the  other  one,  re-

lating to  the  management  of  the  Activity,  is the  emerg-

ing  energy.  A  third  energy:  the  Constructivism  can  be 

defined  in  the  here  and  now,  as  the  dynamic  result  of 

the  dialogue  between  the  first  two  energies  and  other 

elements in presence.

Gelinas  &  Fortin  call  the  planned  energy  planned 

change  and  the  emerging  energy  emerging  change

Planned  and  emerging  energies  circulate  through  net-

works  of  beliefs,  feelings and  behaviours,  which  are  of 

a different  nature. The  language  attached to each of these  poles is descriptive of  its priorities 

and it sometimes seems people at one pole are unintelligible to people at the other. 

Fig. 1 – Types of organisational forces

Environment

Activity


Constructivism

Planned 

change

Emerging 

change

 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  3

1

 Energy : "what a system owns if it is capable of producing work [...] A vital force capable of bringing change". (Robert dictionary)



2

 Berne, Eric (1963) : Structure and Dynamics of Organisations and Groups. Grove Press.

  Environment, p. 242 : "The universe outside the group space".

  Activity, p. 237 : "Purposeful work done by a group on its material".




My  research indicates  that  dialogue  is possible  and allows an  organisation  to  bridge  the  lan-

guage  gap  between  the  top  down  planned  change  and  the  bottom  up  emerging  change  by 

providing a common frame of reference.

I  represented  these  two  energies  with  two  arrows  (Figure  1),  one  oriented  downwards  to 

symbolically  project  the  objectives into  the  system,  the  other  upwards to  represent  the  rais-

ing, through the hierarchical layers, of information concerning the Activity.

Constructivism  is  here  and  now  the  visible  parts  (Public  Structure

1

)  of  the  company  and  is 



represented  by  a  large  yellow  rectangle.  Its  position,  as  partly  including  the  arrows,  shows 

that  the  structure's constructivism is affected by the interaction of those  two arrows as well as 

that of other parameters. 

From the  system's  Environment, are  drawn  the  activity 

objectives, the goals to be achieved, as well  as the sys-

tem's resources.  The  structure's external  boundary  de-

velops  around  the  mission

2

  and  belonging  criteria  re-



lated  to  the  job.  Through the  execution of  the  mission

the  system  returns  to  the  Environment  a  product  or  a 

service that will satisfy the demand. (Figure 2) 

The  two  energies  are  complementary  and  work  in  cy-

cles. 

4. Planned or Emerging Change ?



A  manager  sometimes  uses  planned  change  when  interacting  with  his  subordinates,  and 

sometimes uses emerging change when he is working with  his peers (the  other managers), to 

establish  or  implement  the  mission  contract

3

.  Only  the  group  authority  is  not  emergent.  All 



the  other members in his / her hierarchy are  involved  in  the  emerging change process. Hence 

the name emerging change given to this whole social dynamics (Figure 3).

4.1. Planned Change

represents the energy of  decision making and planning  of the organisational process.  It is the 

group  authority  in  action.  This  energy finds its legitimacy in  the  notion  of  persistence.  It  is 

focused  on  the  management of  the  Environment,  aligning the  structure  on the  external stra-

tegic elements, which keep the structure alive by giving it its purpose. 

The  arrow of  planned  change  symbolically  represents the  synergy  of  the  decision  makers of 

all  the  internal structures of a system.  Each  structure  –  in the  person  of  its leader  – has one 

element of planned change



Planned change is the  prerogative  of the group authority but is not exclusively reserved to him 

/ her. Anyone  uses planned  energy when  individually making  an operational  decision  in  rela-

tion with the objective (Example: use this machine rather than that one). 

In  his  role  of  the  person  in  charge  of  planned  change,  the  Leader,  is  responsible  to  manage 

two contracts:

Fig. 2 – Cycle of organisational forces

Public Structure

Environment

Activity

 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  4

1

 Ibid., p. 249. Public structure : "The individual and the organisational structures which are open to public observation. Individual structure: the 



specific individuals, represented by their personas, who make up the membership at a given time.".

2

 Gioanm Pierre (1960) : Dictionnaire usuel. Quillet, Flammarion. "Job given to a person or a group to accomplish a definite task.".



3

 The Mission contract is an on-going dialogue around the elaboration of the Public Structure. The Vision contract is an on-going dialogue about

  all the planned objectives and their prioritisation. The Cooperation contract is an on-going dialogue between team members around the tasks

  management.




4.1.1. Vision contract

The vision contract covers all planned objectives and their prioritisation.

The  manager  collects  information  to  be  able  to  decide  on  the  strategic 

elements  of  the  Environment  (versus  non  strategic).  I.e.  the  leader  must 

be  able  to  discriminate  – in  the  complexity  of all  that  surrounds  the  sys-

tem – the  key-elements from  which he  /  she will  work  out  his objectives. 

The Environment is external and internal

1

 :

In  the  external  Environment  (external  boundary),  in  an  often  unstable 



way, are: 

‣ the Market, customers, competitors, suppliers, the political and economical situation, social 

laws, etc.

In the  internal Environment (major and minor internal boundaries) the following elements can 

be found: 

‣ one or more leader's senior managers, 

‣ the colleagues who hold influence or useful resources for the achievement of objectives.

‣ the  manager's peers and everyone  in the organization who do not belong to his own struc-

ture.

Based  on  the  information  collected  about  these  elements  and  according  to  the  subsequent 



priorities  he  develops,  the  manager  works  out  his  vision  contract  and  formulates  the  objec-

tives, holding into account today's internal and external reality.



4.1.2. Mission contract (Part A)

The  mission  contract  is  in  two  parts.  It  ensures  there  is  an  on-

going  dialogue around the  continuous development of an  agreed 

Public  Structure  (Figure  4). This structure  is the  resource needed 

to operationally fulfil the vision contract

In  parallel with  the  development of  objectives,  the  overall  Leader 

is responsible  to  set  up  a process, which will allow for  the  opera-

tions to achieve this overall task.



Mission contract (Part A)  is  a complex  step, which involves operational  and functional  (group 

apparatus

2

)  actors  at  the  same  time.  This  step  aims  at  making  the  objectives  known  (top 



down),  at  consulting  the  actors  to  develop  consensual  proposals  (bottom  up)  about  the  or-

ganisation  chart,  thus allowing  the  Manager  to  make  the  decisions  that  set  all  the  actors in 

the optimum working conditions.

To  this end,  the  leader  makes a request to  the  team for  consensual  proposals relating  to the 

task  distribution  and  strategy,  which  they  recommend.  Then,  a negotiation  takes  place  be-

tween his / her vision and theirs within the mission contract framework.

This  step is  based on  the  ethical  values  of the  manager  (unconditional  support  of  the  struc-

ture  and  co-operation)  – and  aims to  guarantee  effectiveness in  the  activity,  and  pleasure  in 

Fig. 3 – The Leader

Fig. 4 – The Leader and group members



 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  5

1

 Berne, Eric (1963) : Structure and Dynamics of Organisations and Groups. Grove Press, p. 58.



  Definition and diagrams of the Major and minor external and internal borders.

2

 Ibid., p. 238. The organs that ensure the survival of a group.




succeeding.  In  the  mission  contract,  there  is permanent  adjustment  and  negotiation  between 

the leader's (mission contract A) and the group member's (mission contract B) points of view.

4.2. Emerging Change

Emerging change represents the  energy of  sharing  and implementing activities as required  by 

planned  change.  Emerging change is focused on  the  most  professional  possible  achievement 

of the  overall  task. Herein  lies the  love  for  the  work,  which  is  the  heart  of  the  company and 

the reason why it exists.

The  emerging  change  arrow  symbolically  represents the  synergy  of  the  team members of  all 

the  internal structures of a system connected to each other when achieving  the activity. Each 

structure  holds an  element  of  the  emerging  change  in  the  person  who  achieves  the  activity. 

Just  as there  are  strategic  elements  of  the  Environment,  described  above  and  dealt  with  by 



planned change, in the  same way, there are  strategic elements of the  Activity of  a very differ-

ent nature: 

The  Activity  strategic  elements  are  the  external  and  internal  circumstances  within  the  de-

partment, the  events (absences, diseases, conflicts, level of  competence, breakdowns of ma-

chines,  non  delivery  of  supplies,  and  also  geographic,  historic  situation  of  the  team  or  the 

activity),  all  the  elements,  which  condition  the  success  of  the  task  from  day  to  day.  The 

more  the  team are  informed  about  each  other,  their  system and  their  professional  field  and 

the  better they will  manage  these  elements. Yet,  part of these elements are not visible  by the 

manager and thus their importance tends to be discounted by the actors.

Emerging  Change is  different  from planned  change,  where  in  the  last count,  only one  person 

actually  makes a decision.  Emerging  Change  "emerges"  from the  vision  of  each  and  every 

team member of what is necessary for the success of his own segment of the overall activity. 

When  these  visions  do  not  get  duly  processed  and  prioritized  in  a  consensual  manner,  the 



planned  change  person  may  be  overwhelmed  by  a  multitude  of  different  strategic  elements 

from  the  various  actors  or  categories  of  actors  and  may  be  disturbed  in  his  /  her  ability  to 

make relevant decisions.

The team member  uses emerging energy when he / she  is consulting peers within the mission 



contract  to  provide  elements  for  operational  decision.  The  group  members  manage  the 

emerging  energy  through  the  use  of  two  contracts:  cooperation  contract  and mission  contract 



(part B).

4.2.1. Cooperation contract

1

In  the  same  way  as  individuals  sometimes  may  not  feel 

responsible  for  what  is  going  on  in  their  life,  and  impute 

things to chance, some teams are  not  empowered to deal 

with  their  daily  issues  and  place  unrealistic  expectations 

on  their  leader.  Through  the  cooperation  contract  the  ac-

tors  empower  their  team  to  become  responsible  for  solv-

ing the difficulties that can be solved at their level.

They develop within the  team dialogue  modalities allowing 

Fig. 5 – The group members



 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  6

1

 The author differentiates between Cooperation relationships taking place between peers and Collaboration relationships taking place between



  subordinates and hierarchy.


for a  consensual  dialogue  with  the  leader.

1

 The  team is then  charged to  collect  and prioritize 



strategic  information  about  the  activity and  suggest  how to  report  it  to  the  leader.  This  way 

only relevant  information  reaches the  leader.  It  guarantees the  development  of  an  organisa-

tional structure, which will make it possible to reach and maintain results.

The  cooperation  contract implies  that  everyone  considers  human  relations  a  priority and,  be-

yond  hats and  titles,  is prepared to set aside  personal considerations in order  to optimise the 

whole organisation. It is through this unconditional solidarity within a team that they manifest 

their respect of their leader's values (structure unconditional  support and co-operation).  Well-

defined cooperation contracts guarantee structure cohesion.

The  cooperation  contract  requires  a  high  level  of  personal  autonomy,  confidence  in  one's 

own competence, the  competence  of peers, the  sharing of vulnerabilities, and the  pleasure of 

sharing  the  common activity doing quality work.  It  is due  to  the  mission  contract  that  contri-

butions to  the  vision emerge in a consensual  dialogue making the  whole  larger  than  the  sum 

of its parts.

4.2.2. Mission contract (Part B)

This  is  the  second  part  of  the  mission  contract concerning  the  agreement  about  the  interac-

tion  modalities  with  the  leader.  The  needs  in  the  hierarchical  relationship  from  the  subordi-

nates  point  of  view  are  expressed  here.  Due  to  this  part  of  the  contract  the  actors are  em-

powered  in  the  hierarchical  dialogue  and establish  an  OK  /  OK  relationship  with their  leader: 

they  are  empowered  to  "emerge"  with  their  contribution  to  the  Mission  (task  distribution, 

strategy)  reflecting a  non-scripty reality of the  activity  status.  When  this contract is in  place, 

they will be credible partners in a satisfactory dialogue for both parts

4.3. Constructivism

The schools of Constructivism are  many and the 

object  of  this article  is not  to expose  this  theory 

in  detail  but  it  seems  interesting  to  recall  the 

many  bonds  between  Constructivism  and 

Transactional  Analysis.  Berne  himself  was  di-

rectly inspired  by  Cyberneticians  and in  particu-

lar by Norbert Wiener and Gregory Bateson

2

.

Constructivism  is what  can  be  socially observed 



of  a  system  at  a  given  time.  The  reality  is  "co-

constructed"  by  the  actors  and  is  a  result  of 

their interactions. At social level,  it  is manifested 

by  the  Public  Structure  as  described  by  Berne 

(what can be seen from the outside). 

According  to  Peter  Drucker

3

 each  and  every action  taken  by  individuals is  in  the  context  of 



their own Theory of the Business. This is the common view of reality in disguise and it is only 

when each theory of the  business is more  or less aligned with the  others that  the organisation 

Fig. 6 – The Keys to Hierarchical Dialogue

Mission Contract

Dialogue

Innovation

Vision


Contract

Cooperation 

Contract

 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  7

1

 This does not mean that everyone should be consulted all the time about all situations. It means that the team has agreed on a process allowing



  to identify when, how, and on what subjects, the team will consult to guarantee that the leader will get objective, realistic, and relevant

  information.

2

 Berne, Eric (1963) : Structure and Dynamics of Organisations and Groups. Grove Press, p. 99.



  Unknown (1971) : Transactional Analysis and Psychotherapy. Petite bibliothèque Payot, p. 81.

3

 Drucker, Peter (1968) : The practice of management. Pan Books Ltd, p.167.




can  evolve  beyond  mere  survival  and  attempt  to  reach  for  higher  order  goals  with  efficient, 

ethical and aesthetic considerations.

At the  psychological  level,  the  Public  Structure  includes the  Individual  Structure

1

 and  Private 



Structure

2

. One can observe  the  way the jobs boxes  on  the  organisational  chart  are  "inhabit-



ed"

3

,  i.e.  how the  actual  actors  live  and  manage  the  activity  (motivation  for  task,  sickness, 



absenteeism, etc.). (Figure 4)

When the three  contracts (visionmission and cooperation)  are  dealt with adequately, planned 



change and emerging change meld in a harmonious way so that  the common view of reality is 

effectively  the  same  and  relevant.  Environment  AND  Activity  strategic  elements  are  then 

aligned. 

4.4. The Winning Script – the successful Mission Contract

In the winning  scenario, the  leader's values are explicit. They are  relevant and  in  line with the 

Canon  and  the Culture.  Contracted  rules  frame  the  on-going  dialogue  between  the  members 

of the  groups and their  managers. The  leader  gets a consensual contribution from his subor-

dinates into  the  group  process.  A dialogue  exists around  the  structure  of  the  system,  which 

guarantees the communication of unbiased information on the  strategic aspects of the  Activ-

ity as well as on those of the Environment (Figure 3).

 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  8

1

 Berne, Eric (1963) : Structure and Dynamics of Organisations and Groups. Grove Press, p. 249.



  Individual structure : "The specific individuals, represented by their personas, who make up the membership at a given time.".

2

 Ibid. Private structure : "The group imago of each member.".



3

 Ibid., p. 57 : "While it is useful to try to understand what a structural diagram might represent, it must always be remembered that this is only

  a preparation for meeting real people participating in real transactions.".



5. Presentation of the OK++ Emerging dialogue in Fox's diagram 

Group Authority

Group Authority

Group Members

Group Work



Leadership

Canon

Group Members

Group Work

- Responsible

- Effective

- Psychological

Evhemerus

Primal

Personal


 - Director

 - Assistant

 - Delegate

Apparatus

Constitution

and Laws – Name



    Objectives

     Culture

     - Technique

     - Etiquette

     - Character

Private Structure

(Ideology / Cohesion)

Imago adjustment

- Provisional (ritual)

- Adaptive (pass-time)

- Operative (games)

- Secondary (intimacy)



Activity

Process (Survival)

           External

           Internal

   Participation

   Involvement

   Engagement

   Belonging

The  concepts of Environment  and Activity

1

, around which the polarisation  Planned  / Emerg-



ing  is made  are  present  in  Berne's Organisational  Theory and in Fox's diagram. In  the  Group 

Authority column  (Leadership and Canon)  and  in the  columns of Group Members  and  Group 

Work,  the  Planned and  Emerging arrows can  be placed and ideally they meet in  a social  dia-

logue at the level of the Public Structure box. 

As  the  Group  Authority  Column  is  covering  the  Leadership  and  Canon,  it  can  be  deducted 

that  leaders  are  in charge  – amongst other  responsibilities  – of  the  Vision  Contract  (develop-

ing  objectives and  a  Constitution)  and  of  the  Mission  Contract  (put  a structure  in  place  and 

rules of conduct).

As  the  Group  Members  column,  together  with  the  Group  Work,  are  covering  the  notions  of 

Individual  and  Private  Structures,  one  can  suppose  that  people's  experience  in  sharing  the 

Activity,  is  the  group  member's  responsibility,  and  can  be  analysed  and  structured.  Conse-

quently the Cooperation contract can be placed in these columns.



 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  9

1

 Ibid., p. 243. Environment : "The universe outside the group space.".



  Ibid., p. 237. Activity : "Purposeful work done by a group on its material.".

Environment

Public Structure

Organisational 

Individual

Structure 

Structure

(Efficiency) 

(Physical existence)



Rules

Autotelic

Provisions

A

P

C

Dialogue

Fig. 7 – Fox's Diagram




6. Scripts and dysfunctions

My research  revealed  two common types of dysfunctions,  which  I  call losing script 1  and  los-



ing  script  2.  Both  dysfunctions  result  from  an  imbalance  in  the  dialogue  between  emerging 

change  and  planned  change.  An  imbalance  generates  a  form  of  contamination,  which  be-

comes visible in the contracts analysis (Passivity

1

).

6.1. Losing script 1



In  losing  script  1,  there  may  be  problems in  the  vision  contract:  decisions  and  strategies  are 

made  without  taking  into  account  the  demands,  opportunities  and  constraints  in  the  Envi-

ronment – and / or  in the mission contract (A) : planned change's authority and responsibilities 

are  overlooked.  Agitation

2

 endangers the  leader's performance.  The  survival  of  the  structure 



is threatened.

Case  1  :  In an  industrial private  research  centre,  scien-

tists focus their  research  on  what enriches their science 

seldom connecting  their  work  to  the  improvement  of  a 

product.  They  represent  an  important  cost  and  rarely 

do  they  provide  a  proportional  return  of  investment. 

Therefore the system's survival may be threatened. 

Case 2  : In  a crisis, some  foremen refuse  to  collaborate 

with  a  manager  who  has  been  imposed  on  them  after 

restructuring. They criticise  the  management in front of 

their  clients  and  their  subordinates.  This  leads  to  a 

chaotic  task  execution.  The  organisation  looses  credit 

in the customer’s eyes. 

Case 3 : Two conflicting managers have  started building their  own structure  independently so 

as not to have  to  interact anymore. Several  activities are  duplicated,others have  disappeared 

and  this  leads  to  tensions  between  the  collaborators  and  with  customers  at  several  activity 

levels.  The group  energy  is wasted managing  the  conflict.  The  top management is penalised 

in their  decision  making process because  the  strategic  information comes up  in a partial and 

thus manipulatory way.

Fig. 8 – Losing script 1

Planned Change

Emerging Change



 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  10

1

 Stewart, Ian & Joines, Van (1991) : TA Today. Russel Press, p. 173. Passivity : "How people do not do things or do not do them effectively.".



2

 Ibid., p. 238. Agitation : "The collective strength of active individual proclivities.".




6.2. Losing script 2

In  losing script  2,  there  may be  problems  in  the  cooperation  contract:  decisions and  strategies 

are  made  without  taking into  account  the  demands,  opportunities and constraints  in  the  Ac-

tivity – and / or in the mission contract (B) the manager discounts the need to consult with the 

team or the team is not ready to contribute consensually to the  development of  the organisa-

tional chart.

The  manager  still needs to  plan  and so decides instead  of them what is relevant  for the  suc-

cess of the  Activity

1

. Unfortunately he may not have  knowledge  of some  the elements of Ac-



tivity  and his  plan  decisions may be  flawed.  The survival  of  the  structure  is threatened when 

this type of imbalance occurs.

The  two  loosing  scripts  can  be  brought  together  as  for  example  when  script  2  can  be  ob-

served,  at social level,  one can be confronted  to  a fantasy of script 1  at  psychological  level in 

the  leader's mind,  i.e.  he  leads  with  the  fear  to  be  overwhelmed by the  group.  Conversely, in 

script  No1, the  actors  may believe  that  their  leader is threatening their  survival  in the  system 

or the survival of the system itself.

Case  1  :  In  an  IT  company,  a  European  Training  Man-

ager  demands to  have  300  student  manuals made  im-

mediately  for  his  manager’s  visit  in  one  of  the  local 

training  centres.  On  the  day  he  gives  the  order  two  of 

the  local  people  are  sick  and  three  photocopiers  are 

broken.  Since  there  was no way to negotiate  the  dead-

line  and  with  these  two  elements  of  the  task  missing, 

the  extraordinary  pressure  was  demotivating  for  the 

team.


Case  2  :  The  manager  of  a  new  food  factory  making 

innovative  products hired me  because  of  on going con-

flicts  between  the  foremen.  Few  employees  mastered 

the  new technology so the  factory manager had posted experts to report about problems and 

issues on  the  production  lines.  The  emerging  energy  was short circuited because  the  experts 

were  reporting  directly to  the  factory  Manager  instead  of the  employees to  the  foremen, the 

foremen  to  the Production  Manager  and the  Production Manager to the Factory Management 

team. The  foremen had  lost their  privilege of collecting,  prioritising and reporting the  strategic 



elements  of Activity.  And thus, the  cooperation contract  became  meaningless  and the  mission 

contract  (B)  lost  its credibility  in  a losing script 2.  The  stroke  economy  went  into scarcity and 

people were fighting.

Presented  with  the  emerging  change  concept,  the  teams  were  able  to  situate  the  problem  at 

the  mission contract level and  how this affected  their cooperation contract. It  was negotiated in 

the  mission  contract  that  the  experts  would  talk  to  the  foremen  first  and  that  the  foremen 

would  collect  and prioritise  the  information  for  the  Head  of  Production  who  would  attend the 

Management  meetings with the  experts. The  information circuit went  back to normal.  So  did 

the stroke economy and the conflicts ceased.

Fig. 9 – Losing script 2

Planned Change

Emerging Change

 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  11

1

 Gilles Pellerin, TSTA-O calls "Sous-fonction" literally "below the function" the situation in which the leader inappropriately invests his energy



  thinking and organising the activity strategy while his role should be in the proprietary management of his Environment...


7. Intervention Strategy

Installing Emerging Change in a research centre.

Roughly  400  scientists  belonging  to  several  disciplines,  and  in  different  departments  of  the 

same  organisation  (immunologists,  nutritionists,  microbiologists  and  gastro-enterologists), 

were grouped into several “platforms”  (Gut, Skin, Brain, Bones). The idea of introducing plat-

forms was to encourage cooperation and  to  work  more effectively and thus to produce  more 

innovations.

Upon  her  appointment,  the  Gut  platform  manager  asked  us  to  help  stimulate  the  Gut  plat-

form  which  had  been  stagnant  for  two  years  in  an  example  of  losing  scenario  2  where 

Planned  Change is dominant.  We  taught her  how to use  our  Psycho Dynamic  Theory and to 

identify how the  Emerging  change  was not  playing its  part. We  clarified what was her  role  as 

the  planned change  manager  to enable a balanced situation and to give emerging change  an 

equal role.

The  platform  idea  gathered  scientists  in  a  space  free  from  hierarchical  reporting.  Its  correct 

operation  requires  changes  in  the  current  system  of  evaluation,  which  is  presently  made 

mainly  on  scientific  results and  the  number  of  individual  publications.  The  contracts are  set 

up via a person in  the  Human Resources Department, who also manages the  interventions of 

consultants.

My  work  consisted  of supporting  scientists  from two  departments:  Nutrition  and  Bioscience, 

and the  establishment  of  cooperation  contracts  at  several  levels.  This  work  allowed  the  GUT 

organisational  platform  to  achieve  the  goals  with  consensual  contribution  and  allowed  the 

culture to evolve from individualism to cooperation. Emergent Change was enabled.

Head of

Department



Heads of

Platf


orms

Employees

Gut Platform

Bones Platform

Other Platform

Fig. 10 – Innovation of emerging change methodology in a research centre

Vision contracts

Mission contracts

Cooperation contracts

Mrs I


 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  12


I coached the emerging human process by working on the three contracts : 

‣ Vision  Contract:  How are  the  objectives and  rules  understood  and  perceived  by the  scien-

tists  ?  In  this  context,  where  the  vision  was  expressed  in  a  very  «  planned  »  language, 

coaching  the  Vision  Contract  consisted  in  looking  for  blocs  in  the  integration  of  the  mes-

sage  et  ended  up  leading  to  renewed  presentations of  short,  middle  and  long  term  objec-

tives at different levels of the organisation.

‣ Cooperation  Contracts :  The  were  installed in  each  of  the relevant departments at  each  hi-

erarchical  levels : technicians with each  other, scientists of different disciplines gathered in 

the  same  platform,  and  Mrs  I  with  her  peers,  the  other  platform  managers.  the  work  con-

sisted in identifying working values to ensure the success of this new process.

‣ Mission  Contracts  :  Part  A was  developed  in  the  individual  coaching  sessions  with  Mrs  I.: 

This  consisted in  helping  her  clarify  and  express her  needs in  her  interaction  with  her  sub-

ordinates, i.e how she  wanted  the  strategic  elements of the Activity and the  related sugges-

tions and recommendations to be communicated to her.

Part  B  :  with  the  different  teams  after  the  cooperation  contract  was operational.  This  was 

about  helping them  to  agree on  expectations in  their  interactions with their  manager.  Mrs  I 

lead  the  Mission  contract  negotiations  (between  A  and  B)  alone  with  her  team.  The  im-

provement  of  results was visible and  soon after this,  Mrs I was promoted  as Manager of her 

Department. 

This  consulting  work  reassured  people  and  helped  change  the  culture  from  a  strongly  indi-

vidualistic  to  a  more  cooperative  environment:  after  the  intervention  some  scientists started 

sharing  their vision  for  common  potential  research. According to the  scientific  relevance  and 

the  possible  outcomes of  each of  their projects,  they  were  able  to formulate  consensual  rec-

ommendations concerning the choice of projects and the platform strategy.

Because  the  platform gathers scientists in  a space  free  of  hierarchical  reporting,  this new or-

ganisation  may demand  that a  change  be  negotiated  in the  performance  evaluation system, 

which  is presently based on scientific  results and the  number of publications, to modalities of 

evaluation discussed and agreed between the scientists and their management.

8. Conclusion

The psychodynamic  Theory of  Emerging Change  gives a global vision  of  the  human process 

of each structure  within  the  organisation. It is  accessible  to  all  categories  of  actors,  and ad-

dresses  them  in  a  challenging  manner.  It  gives  them  a  representation  of  the  organisational 

dynamics and stimulates the installation of contracts resulting in an empowered organisation. 

Therefore,  it  quickly  allows  for  the  development of  the  managers,  actors and  teams to  have 

autonomy. 

The  work  presented  here  on  the  Emerging  Change  Methodology  allows  for  a  concrete  visual 

representation  of  the  group  dynamics  based  on  an  OK  /  OK  difference  in  values,  strategies 

and  feelings  between  the  planned  and  emerging  energies.  Inserted  in  Fox's  diagram,  it  com-

plements  it  in  emphasising  the  two  organisational  flows and  their  interaction  resulting  in the 

on-going development of the Public Structure.

It  gives  the  actors  access  to  tools  from  Berne's  Organisational  Theory  and  Transactional 

Analysis in general.



 

Madeleine Laugeri – Emerging Change  13

: system -> files
files -> Dövlət qeydiyyatına alınmışdır
files -> Şirkət hüquqşunasının fəaliyyətinin psixoloji xüsusiyyətləri
files -> Qəsdən adam öldürmə işləri üzrə məhkəmə təcrübəsi haqqında
files -> Kadrlar şöbəsının mütəxəssısının vəzifə təlimatı Ümumi MÜDDƏalar
files -> Azərbaycan Respublikası Nazirlər Kabinetinin 2013-cü IL 13 avqust tarixli 207 nömrəli qərarı ilə
files -> Sosial müavinətlərin məbləğinin artırılması haqqında
files -> Valideynlərin və digər qohumların uşaqla ünsiyyətdə olmaq hüquqları ilə əlaqədar qanunvericiliyin məhkəmələr tərəfindən tətbiqi təcrübəsi haqqında” Azərbaycan Respublikası Ali Məhkəməsi Plenumunun q ə r a r I
files -> Azərbaycan Respublikasında daimi yaşayan vətəndaşlığı olmayan şəxslərin xüsusi sənədləri haqqında
files -> Ceyhun Əzizov


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə