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MODULE OUTLINE

Modern Liberal Arts

University of Winchester

Semester 1 2015

LA 2001 Freedom is to Learn

Thursdays 15.30-17.30 MB2

Tubbs


Module Learning Outcomes

Show engagement with primary sources

Show a knowledge of theoretical perspectives and/or works

Show an understanding of abstract concepts and ideas within theoretical perspectives

Show an ability to work with theorists and their concepts in various forms of assessment as appropriate

Show evidence of engagement with texts and ideas concerned with issues surrounding freedom in the world

Weekly seminars (full list of references at the end)

how can light and darkness be in agreement?’ (Erasmus, 1964, Enchiridion, p. 30).



Week 1 Aristotle on masters and slaves

Readings: Aristotle, The Politics, pp. 63-9, 94-97, 451-471.

Plato, The Laws, 713-14

Seneca, The Letters, letter XLVII, pp. 90-6.

St Augustine, City of God, pp. 874-6, 893.

St Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, Q21, art. 1 (vol. 1); Q96, art 4 (vol. 4)

Epictetus, Discourses, book IV, chapter 1

Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, IV, 17.

Newman, The Idea of a University, p. 178.

Proctor, Defining the Humanities, pp. 200-1.


Wider reading: Life of Diogenes the Cynic, in Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, Book VI, chapter 2.

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Lives_of_the_Eminent_Philosophers/Book_VI#Diogenes

St Augustine, City of God, Book XIX

St Thomas Aquinas, Q105, art. 4 (vol. 8)

Universal Declaration of Human Rights



http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/

Aquinas, Commentary on Aristotle’s Politics,

Plato, (1971) Gorgias, 483-5.

Smith, A. (1986) Wealth of Nations, pp. 488-9.

Ward, ‘Ethnos in the Politics: Aristotle and Race,’ in Ward and Lott (2002).

Neill, R. (2011) ‘Slavery in the Writings of Thomas Aquinas,’ http://www.sju.ca/sites/default/files/Library/Headley%20essays/Headley%20Ralph%20Neill.pdf

Clarence-Smith, Islam and the Abolition of Slavery

(Library)



Week 2 Hegel on master and slave
Reading: Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, §178-196

du Bois, The Education of Black People, 106-8, 128.

McLaurin, Celia, a Slave, pp. 113-119.

Maya Angelou ’Still I rise’ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqOqo50LSZ0

Maya Angelou ‘The Mask’ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UT9y9HFHpU0&feature=youtu.be
Wider reading: Sartre, Being and Nothingness, pp. 235-245.

Adler, The Idea of Freedom, Book 2, Part I, chapter 1.

Rousseau, Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, part 2.

Taylor, Hegel, pp. 148-57.

Lacan, The Other Side of Psychoanalysis pp. 20-36, 148-9, 169-72.

Browning, Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit: A Reappraisal, chapter 12.

Harris, H.S. (1995) Hegel: Phenomenology and System, pp. 35-40.

Rose, Mourning Becomes the Law, chapter 3.

Norman, Hegel's Phenomenology

Rockmore, Before and After Hegel, pp. 103-107.

Tubbs Philosophy’s Higher Education, pp. 28-39.

Week 3 Kant and Dostoevsky
Readings: Kant, ‘What is Enlightenment’.

Kant, (2012) On the feeling of the beautiful and the sublime, p. 33-4

Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov, ‘The Grand Inquisitor’, pp. 283-304. http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/dostoyevsky/d72b/chapter36.html

and pp. 360-6, chapter 41



http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/dostoyevsky/d72b/chapter41.html
Wider reading: Kant, Political Writings, pp. 64 & 69.

Kant, (2007) ‘Conjectural beginning of human history’

Williams, Dostoevsky: Language, Faith and Fiction, pp. 27-34.


Week 4 of the slave
Readings: Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks, Intro 171-3

Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, conclusion

Ansbro, J.J. (1982/4) Martin Luther King, The Making of a Mind, 119-128, 214-15, 298.

ML King Jnr, Stride Toward Freedom, 88-9.

Tutu, No Future Without Forgiveness, 34-6, 40, 154-5, 212-19.

du Bois, The Souls of Black Folks, chapter 1.


Wider reading: du Bois The Souls of Black Folks, chapter 11

du Bois, ‘du Bois Speaks to Africa,’



http://www.nathanielturner.com/duboisspeakstoafrica1958.htm

du Bois, The Education of Black People



The Correspondence of W.E.B. Du Bois, Vol. 1: Selections, 1877-1934

Tutu, No Future Without Forgiveness

Diop, C.A, (1991) Civilization or Barbarism, chapter 17.

Krog, Country of my Skull,

White, D.G. (1999) Ar’n’t I a Woman? New York, Norton.

ML King Jnr, (1956) ‘Facing the Challenge of a new age’



http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/primarydocuments/Vol3/3-Dec-1956_FacingtheChallenge.pdf

ML King Jnr, ‘Introduction’ to The Papers of ML King Jnr, vol. II Rediscovering Precious Values, Berkley, University of California Press http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/primarydocuments/Vol2Intro.pdf

ML King Jnr, The Papers of ML King Jnr, vol. II Rediscovering Precious Values, Berkley, University of California Press, (on Maritain, pp. 119-24; on Hegel, pp. 154, 196-201).

ML King Jnr, Stride Toward Freedom

Bernasconi, R, (2009) ‘Our Duty to Conserve: W. E. B. Du Bois's Philosophy of History in Context’ South Atlantic Quarterly Summer2009, Vol. 108 Issue 3, p. 519-540.

Bernasconi, R. (2011) ‘The Impossible Logic of Assimilation,’ Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy, vol. 19. No. 2 http://jffp.pitt.edu/ojs/index.php/jffp/article/view/490

Ellison, R. (1952/2001) Invisible Man.

Genet, J. (1960) The Blacks: a clown show.

Morrison, T. (2005) Song of Solomon.

James Meredith http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-19734976

Slave ‘stories’

McLaurin, M.A. (1991) Celia, a Slave, New York, Avon Books.

Douglass, F. (2009) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Northup, S, (2014) 12 Years a Slave, London, HarperCollins.

Jacobs, H. (2001) Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, New York, Dover.

Equiano, O. (1789/2005) The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African Written By Himself, London.

Dickens, C. (1883 ) American Notes, New York, John Lovell Company, chapter 17.

Week 5 Commodity fetishism

Reading: Tucker, R.C. (1978) The Marx-Engels Reader, London, Norton, pp. 302-323




Week 6 Magritte – messing with identity

‘There are names and there are things. A name is a spoken sound which designates a thing and acts as a sign for it. The name is not part of that thing nor part of its substance’ (Montaigne, The Complete Essays, p. 702).


Readings: Gablik, (1985) magritte, chapter 7, pp. 124-135, 168-172.

Torczyner (1979) Magritte: The True Art of Painting, pp. 28, 71, & 118-25.




Week 7 Weber – Capitalism, Protestantism and Reason
Readings: Weber, M. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, pp. 91, 60-3, 80-1, 108-9, 117-121, 152-8, 162, 169-75.

Weber, Economy and Society, pp. 223-4.

Weber, M. From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, pp. 214-6.

Weber, M. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, pp 180-3.

Handout
Wider reading Pascal, Pensees, on diversion VIII, pp. 66-72.

Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class,

Bataille, (1997) ‘Letter to X’


Week 8 Vincent van Gogh
Reading: letters from De Leeuw, The Letters of Van Gogh

http://www.webexhibits.org/vangogh/

http://vangoghletters.org/vg/letters.html

Wider reading: Wyschogrod, ‘Disrupting Reason: Art and Madness in Hegel and van Gogh’, in Zizek et al. Hegel and the Infinite.

Augustine, On The Trinity, XI.8.13

Bataille, Visions of Excess, pp. 61-72.

Heidegger, ‘The Origin of the Work of Art’ in Basic Writings, pp. 158-162.

McQuillan, Van Gogh.

Walther, Van Gogh.

Uhde, Van Gogh.

Bruce, Van Gogh.

Bonafoux, Van Gogh: the passionate eye

‘Philosophers Rumble Over Van Gogh’s Shoes’

http://harpers.org/archive/2009/10/hbc-90005828

Montaigne, (2003) ‘How we weep and laugh at the same thing’

Film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvWHOj79vrw

Film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMzh-s8qeSo&feature=youtu.be


Week 9 Nietzsche’s Zarathustra
Reading: Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra, in The Portable Nietzsche, pp. 121-39, 225-8, 249-53, 267-71, 342-3.
Wider reading: Tolstoy, My Religion: What I Believe, chapter 1.

Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy

Allison (ed.) The New Nietzsche.

Rosen, The Mask of Enlightenment.

Ansell-Pearson, An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker.

Agamben, The Man Without Content, pp. 85-93.

Tubbs, Contradiction of Enlightenment, chapter 8.

Tubbs, ‘The Return of the Teacher’, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 35: 1.

Tubbs, Philosophy of the Teacher, chapter 7.

Tubbs, Philosophy’s Higher Education, chapter 5.

We will decide the content of weeks 10-12 in discussion in the module, from a list of possibilities.

Assessment

Assessment 1: (50%) Using texts from weeks 1-3 describe different perspectives on the master/slave relationship (2000-2250 words; deadline: Week 4 Thursday 15 Oct given to Catherine in the Office by 3.30pm).


Assessment 2: (50%) from a list that grows week by week… (2000-2250 words; deadline Week 12 Thursday 8th December given to Catherine in the Office by 3.30pm).

Use Harvard Referencing

We attempt always to return work within 3 working weeks (15 days working days).

References

Adams St. Pierre, E. (2004) ‘Deleuzian Concepts for Education: the subject undone’, Educational Philosophy and Theory, vol. 36, no. 3.

Adler, M. (1958) The Idea of Freedom, New York, Doubleday and Co.

Adorno, TW. (1983) Prisms, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.

Adorno, T.W. (2005) Beethoven, Cambridge, Polity Press.

Agamben, G. (1999) The Man Without Conent, Stanford, Stanford University Press.

Allison, D.B. (1985) The New Nietzsche, Cambridge Massachusetts, The MIT Press.

Ansbro, J.J. (1982) Martin Luther King, The Making of a Mind, New York, Orbis Books.

Ansell-Pearson, K. (1994) An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Aquinas, T. (1920) The “Summa Theologica of St Thomas Aquinas, in 22 volumes, trans. By Fathers of the English Dominican Province, 2nd ed., London, Burns Oates & Washbourne Ltd.

Aristotle, (1981) The Politics, London, Penguin.

Armstrong, A.H. (1953) Plotinus, London: George Allen & Unwin.

Auerbach, E. (1961) Dante Poet of the Secular World, New York, New York Review of Books.

Augustine, (1972) City of God, London, Penguin

Augustine, (1998) Confessions, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Augustine, (2002) On The Trinity, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Bataille, G. (1985) Visions of Excess, Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.

Bataille, G. (1997) The Bataille Reader, Oxford, Blackwell.

Boccaccio, G. (2011) Life of Dante, Richmond, One World Classics.

Bonafoux, P. (1992) Van Gogh: The Passionate Eye, London, Thames & Hudson.

Botting, F. and Wilson, S. (1997) The Bataille Reader, Oxford, Blackwell.

Brod, M. (1972) The Diaries of Franz Kafka, London, Penguin.

Browning, G. (1997) Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit: a re-appraisal, Dordrecht, Kluwer.

Bruce, B. (1992) Van Gogh, London, Dorling Kindersley.

Buck-Morss, S. (1979) The Origin of Negative Dialectics, New York, The Free Press.

Bürger, P. (2002) The Thinking of the Master, Evanston, Northwestern University Press.

Canetti, E. (2012) Kafka’s Other Trial, London, Penguin.

Cicero, (2001) Letters to his Friends, Loeb Classical Library.

Clarence-Smith, W.G. (2005) Islam and the Abolition of Slavery, London, C Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd.

Claussen, D. (2008) Adorno, one last genius, Harvard University Press

Critchley, S. and Schroeder, W. (eds.) (1999) A Companion to Continental Philosophy, Oxford, Blackwell, chapter 51.

Dante, (1984) The Divine Comedy vol. 1: Inferno, trans. M Musa, London: Penguin.

Dante, (1996) Monarchy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dante, (2002) The New Life (Vita Nuova) New York, New Review Books.

De Leeuw, R. (1996) The Letters of Van Gogh, Harmondsworth, Penguin.

Descartes, R. (1985) Discourse on Method in The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, vol 1, trans. Cottingham, Stoothoof & Murdoch, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Dickens, C. (1883 ) American Notes, New York, John Lovell Company, chapter 17.

Dostoevsky, F. (1993) The Brothers Karamazov, London: Penguin.

Du Bois, W.E.B. (2001) The Education of Black People, New York, Monthly Review Press.

Douglass, F. (2009) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Eagleton, T. (2005) Figures of Dissent, London, Verso.

Eliot, TS. (1929) Dante, London, Faber and Faber

Eliot, TS, Dante (from The Sacred Wood) at

http://www.bartleby.com/200/sw14.html

Epictetus, (1877) The Discourses of Epictetus; with the Encheiridion and fragments, London, George Bell and sons.

Equiano, O. (1789/2005) The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African Written By Himself, London.

Erasmus, D. (1964) The Essential Erasmus, New York, Meridian.

Fanon, F. (1986) Black Skin White Masks, London, Pluto Press.

Fanon, F. (2001) The Wretched of the Earth, London, Penguin.

Gablik, S. (1985) magritte, London: Thames and Hudson.

Gilson, E. (1963) Dante and Philosophy, New York, Harper Torchbook.

Harris, H.S. (1995) Hegel: Phenomenology and System, Indianapolis, Hackett Publishing Co.

Hegel, G.W.F. (1967) Philosophy of Right, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Hegel, G.W.F. (1975) ‘Love’ in Early Theological Writings, Philadelphia, University of Philadelphia Press.

Hegel, G.W.F. (1975) Hegel’s Aesthetics, Clarendon Press, Oxford.

Hegel, G.W.F. (1977) Phenomenology of Spirit, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Hegel, G.W.F. (1984) Hegel: The Letters, Bloomington, Indiana University Press.

Hegel, G.W.F. (1990) Philosophy of Mind, Oxford, Clarendon Press.

Heidegger, M. (1996) Basic Writings, ed. David Farrell Krell, London, Routledge.

Hyppolite, J. (1974) Genesis and Structure of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, Evanston, Northwestern University Press.

Innocent III, (1969) On The Misery of the Human Condition (De miseria humane conditionis), Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill.

Jay, M. (1996) The Dialectical Imagination, University of California Press.

Jacobs, H. (2001) Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, New York, Dover.

Jacoff, E. (ed) 1993) The Cambridge Companion to Dante, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Kafka, (1992) Kafka’s Letters to Felice, London, Minerva.

Kafka, F. (1993) Collected Stories, ed. Gabriel Josipovici, London, Everyman.

Kafka, F. (1994) The Trial, London, Penguin.

Kant, I. (1992) Political Writings, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Kant, I. (1996) Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Carbondale & Edwardsville, Southern Illinois University Press.

Kant, I. (2012) Anthropology, History and Education, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Kierkegaard, S. (1985) Philosophical Fragments/Johannes Climacus, Princeton, Princeton University Press.

Kierkegaard, S. (1987) Either/Or Parts I and II, Princeton, Princeton University Press.

Kierkegaard, S. (1988) Stages on Life’s Way, Princeton, Princeton University Press.

Kierkegaard, S. (1996) Papers and Journals, A Selection, London, Penguin.

King, ML Jnr, (1958/2011) Stride Toward Freedom, London, Souvenir Press.

Kojeve, A. (1969) Introduction to the Reading of Hegel, Ithaca and London, Cornell University Press

Lacan, J. (2007) The Other Side of Psychoanalysis, New York, Norton.

Lewis, RWB. (2001) Dante a life, London, Penguin.

Lowrie, W. (1944) A Short Life of Kierkegaard, London, Oxford University Press.

Maimonides, M. (1975) The Ethical Writings of Maimonides, New York, Dover Publications.

Montaigne, M. (2003) The Complete Essays, London, Penguin.

Marshall, J.D. (2004) Poststructuralism, Philosophy, Pedagogy, Dordrecht, Kluwer, chapter 5.

McDonald, W. (2003) ‘Love in Kierkegaard’s Symposia’ Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 7: 60–93.

McLaren, P. and Leonard, P. (1993) Paulo Freire; a critical encounter, London, Routledge.

McLaurin, M.A. (1991) Celia, a Slave, New York, Avon Books.

McQuillian, M. (1989) Van Gogh, London: Thames and Hudson.

Montaigne, M. (2003)The Complete Essays, London, Penguin.

Morss, J.R. (2000) ‘The Passional Pedagogy of Gilles Deleuze’, Educational Philosophy and Theory, vol. 32, no. 2.

Müller-Doohm, S. (2005) Adorno, a biography, Cambridge, Polity.

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. (1987) "Henry Corbin: The Life and Works of the Occidental Exile in Quest of the Orient of Light," Ch. 17, in Traditional Islam in the Modern World, Kegan Paul International, London.

Nietzsche, F. (1982) The Portable Nietzsche, London, Penguin.

Northup, S, (2014) 12 Years a Slave, London, HarperCollins.

Noys, B. (2000) George Bataille A Critical Introduction, London, Pluto Press.

Pascal, B. (1966) Pensées, London, Penguin.

Peters, M. (ed.) (1998) Naming the Multiple, Westport, Bergin and Harvey, Introduction and chapter 6.

Phelps, N. (2007) Longest Struggle: Animal Advocacy from Pythagoras to PETA, Lantern Books.

Plato, (1970) The Laws, London, Penguin.

Plato, (1971) Gorgias, London, Penguin.

Plotinus, (1991) The Enneads, London: Penguin.

Regan, T. (2004) The Case for Animal Rights, Berkeley, University of California.

Rockmore, (2003) Before and After Hegel, Indianapolis, Hackett Books

Rose, G. (1995) Love’s Work, London, Chatto and Windus.

Rose, G. (1996) Mourning Becomes the Law, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press

Rousseau, J.J. (1973) The Social Contract and Discourses, London, Everyman.

Rousseau, J.J. (2000) Emile, London, Everyman.

Roy, K. (2004) ‘Overcoming Nihilism: From communication to Deleuzian expression’, Educational Philosophy and Theory, vol. 36, no. 3.

Ryan, C. (2013) Dante and Aquinas, London, Ubiquity Press.

Sartre, J.P. (1969) Being and Nothingness, London, Routledge.

Sartre, J.P. (2007) Existentialism and Humanism, London, Methuen.

Sayers, D.L. (1954) Introductory Papers on Dante, Eugene, Oregon, Wipf and Stock.

Schopenhauer, A. (2000) On The Basis of Morality, Indianapolis, Hackett.

Scruton, R. (2000) ‘Animal Rights, City, summer.

Seneca, (2004) Letters from a Stoic, London, Penguin.

Singer, P. (1995) Animal Liberation, London, Pimlico

Smith, A. (1986) Wealth of Nations, London, Penguin.

Taylor, C. (1975) Hegel, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Taylor, T. (1792), A Vindication of the Rights of Brutes, London, Gainesville, Florida

Tolstoy, L. (2009) My Religion, What I Believe, Guildford, White Crow Books.

Torczyner (1979) Magritte: The True Art of Painting, London: Thames and Hudson.

Tubbs, N. (1997) Contradiction of Enlightenment, Aldershot, Ashgate.

Tubbs, N. (2004) Philosophy’s Higher Education, Dordrecht, Kluwer.

Tutu, D. (1999) No Future Without Forgiveness, London, Rider.

Uhde, W. (1991) Van Gogh, London: Phaidon Press Ltd.

Violin, Mary Ann. "Pythagoras—The First Animal Rights Philosopher," Between the Species 6:122–127.

Veblen, T. (2010) The Theory of the Leisre Class, Readaclassic.

Walther, I. F. (1993) Vincent Van Gogh 1853-1890, Vision and Reality, Köln: Benedikt Taschen.

Ward, J. and Lott, T.L. (2002) Philosophers on Race: critical essays, Oxford, Blackwell.

Weber, M. (1930/1989) The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, London, Unwin Hyman.

Weber, (1978) Economy and Society, Berkeley, University of California Press.

Weber, M. (1985) From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, London, RKP.

Wiggershaus, R. (1995) The Frankfurt School, Cambridge, Polity.

Williams. R. (2008) Dostoevsky: Language, Faith and Fiction, London: Continuum

Zizek, S. et al. (2011) (eds.) Hegel and the Infinite, New York, Columbia University Press.




MODERN LIBERAL ARTS MARK SCHEME


We want you to be very clear about how we will mark your work and that means you must know with each assessment what you are expected to do. We hope that this does not mean you will feel that you have to write to a formula. We are trying to build in considerable freedom to your assessments; but as the term ‘liberal arts’ conveys, in every freedom there is a discipline, and in every discipline there is a freedom; together, we hope, they constitute the struggle of learning.
There are (often but not always) two types of essays in MLA: the first assessment title in a module will most often be set by the tutor and will be restricted to texts explored in the first weeks. The second assessment title can be tutor-led, or chosen from a list of titles, or can be negotiated individually; this varies according to the tutor and the module. This assignment can explore wider issues, employ wider reading, or explore a single issue in depth. Students will bear some responsibility for the references consulted in the second essay, increasing through years 1, 2 and 3.


Tutor-set assessments (disciplina)

Student/tutor-set assessments (libertas)

1st module essay

Marks for



  • depth of understanding specialist terminology

  • depth of understanding of set texts

  • depth of understanding of ideas/concepts

  • evidence by quotation

  • answering the question

  • correct referencing

  • word limit




2nd module essay

Marks for

  • depth of understanding of texts

  • depth of understanding and application of ideas/concepts

  • evidence-based critical arguments

  • depth/breadth of reading (depending on the question)

  • answering your own question

  • correct referencing

  • word limit









Note the difference between essays 1 and 2: the first one is marked only on your understanding of texts; the second one is marked on understanding, on your own reading, and your emerging critical voice. Be careful here; being critical does not mean just giving your opinions. It means making a case based on evidence from your reading, using ideas and concepts from texts. It does not mean you have to fight for one side of an argument or another… ambivalence will be treated with great respect. But for every essay, remember this: if we (and you) get the title right, then by answering the question you will be doing exactly what is required. Over years 1, 2 and 3 the levels of your work are raised by using increasingly challenging texts, ideas, concepts and writers, and by the way you are able to employ ideas, concepts and writers from other modules across the degree in increasingly sophisticated ways.



For all essays, then

Depending on the question you will need to

  • Demonstrate reflection on module material and the wider contexts from across the degree which might impact upon it

  • Communicate experiences of texts and ideas as appropriate

  • Show knowledge and understanding of specialist terminology

  • Demonstrate requisite research skills in gathering, summarizing and presenting evidence including proficiency in referencing and academic conventions.

For essay 1

Depending on the question you will need to

  • Show careful reading of primary sources

  • Show a knowledge of theoretical perspectives and/or works

  • Show an understanding of abstract concepts and ideas within theoretical perspectives

  • Show an ability to work with theorists and their concepts in various forms of assessment as appropriate

  • Show evidence of engagement with texts and ideas concerned with issues raised in the module.

For essay 2

Depending on the question you will need to

  • Show an ability to employ theorists critically in relation to issues

  • Show an ability to use concepts as critical tools in discussing issues and questions as appropriate

  • Show an ability to employ theoretical perspectives as critical tools

  • Therein, to develop a critical voice informed and deepened by appropriate use of theory as critique.

  • Sustain a critical relationship to ideas related to the module

It is often hard to explain in generic terms how any particular essay could have been improved. But, cautiously, we can say the following:

In general,

a 3rd (40-49%) may have ignored the question, may have not given much evidence of reading, may have clumsy sentence structure, but will still have made a bona fide attempt at the work.

a 2.2 (50-59%) will have provided evidence of reading, quotations where appropriate, clear sentence structure, attended to the question or title, but not related the material in ways which synthesise more developed and complex thinking.

a 2.1 (60-69%) will have evidence of reading through effective selection of quotation, being able to make specific points, and to relate material together to make broader and/or deeper and more complex observations. At the higher end, it may have been able to relate material from across modules, or across the degree as a whole, to synthesise separate ideas and issues into more holistic comments, ideas and problems. The questions addressed will be getting ever more difficult and important, including those that are asked without being answered.

a 1st (70-100%) will make a little go a long way. Quotations may carry implications beyond their precise content; sentences will be clear but able to refine complex ideas succinctly; most importantly, it will be able to combine the microcosm of its subject matter with the macrocosm of its place in the wider context, and these contexts will be drawn form the overall, experience of the degree, growing obviously from years 1 to 3. No inaccuracies of grammar or sentence construction, and no referencing mistakes are expected here. The voice of the essay will be in control of difficult material throughout. Above all the questions asked and addressed will be compelling in their difficulty and import.

Module Evaluations (previous year)

Module evaluations commented on a well-designed module, with good teaching, good support, and challenging but enjoyable material. One response commented that some students tended to dominate discussions. This is an issue that we have taken up as a team of tutors, commented on in our Self-Evaluation Document for the revalidation next year, and we have set in place some strategies by which to address this. This is a module where change and flexibility are built-in, able to respond in the second half of the module to student interests, meaning that some material is chosen by the students over that from previous years. This is again proved an interesting and motivating strategy, and is one we intend to continue in the following year.

Catalogue summary



This is the first of two compulsory modules in Modern Liberal Arts at level 5. This module allows students considerable scope in the direction of their work. Each week introduces a new set of issues within which to discuss ideas surrounding freedom. Indicative content here includes assessing freedom within the perspectives of cosmopolitanism, feminism, colonialism, Islamic philosophy, Orientalism, slavery, Holocaust, and existentialism. It is intended that Hegel’s analysis of the master/slave relationship in the Phenomenology of Spirit will form the starting point for discussions.


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