The nadir experience: crisis, transition



Yüklə 126,81 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/9
tarix05.10.2018
ölçüsü126,81 Kb.
#72228
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9

difficulties’’ (p. 460). Tedeschi and Calhoun found that the trauma sample

experienced greater growth than the non-trauma sample at a 99.9%

significance level. In addition, the trauma sample experienced greater growth

in every category except Spiritual Change (which I will discuss in a later

section). In a subsequent work, Tedeschi et al. (2007) concluded that growth

only followed an event that confronted a person’s core beliefs.

Janoff-Bulman (2004), responding to the work of Tedeschi and Calhoun

(1996), hypothesized that posttraumatic growth is a result of three factors. The

first, strength through suffering, refers to trauma survivors discovering new

strengths and developing new coping skills and resources. The second,

psychological preparedness, deals with trauma survivors being better prepared

for subsequent events, and being less traumatized by them. The final one,

existential reevaluation, concerns the survivor’s renewed appreciation for life in

the aftermath of catastrophe. These proposed mechanisms for posttraumatic

growth are plausible, but they require further investigation.

Reflection Rather than Rumination

As I will discuss in a later section, meaning-making is an important part of

posttraumatic growth. However, searching for meaning and finding meaning

are two different things. Boyraz, Horne, and Sayger (2010) used three

assessments with 380 bereaved individuals to test the hypothesis that reflection

may be an important part of meaning-making. The first assessment, the

Positive and Negative Affect Schedule of Watson, Clark, and Tellegen (1988)

contains 20 feelings such as ‘‘upset’’ or ‘‘strong,’’ which respondents rank

according to their experienced over various time intervals from ‘‘this moment’’

to ‘‘over the past year’’ to ‘‘in general’’ (p. 1070). The second assessment, the

Rumination-Reflection Questionnaire of Trapnell and Campbell (1999)

includes 12 ranking questions on rumination such as ‘‘I often find myself

reevaluating something I have done,’’ and 12 on reflection such as ‘‘I love to

meditate on the nature and meaning of things’’(p. 293). The final assessment,

an adaptation of the Positive Meaning Scale of Tugade and Fredrickson

(2004), consists of four questions:

N

‘‘Did anything good come out of dealing with this loss?’’



N

‘‘Do you think you might find benefit from this situation in the long

term?’’

N

‘‘Do you think it is likely that there is something to learn from this



experience?’’

N

‘‘Do you think it is likely that this experience could change your life in a



positive way?’’ (Boyraz et al., 2010).

The authors found a positive correlation between positive affect and reflection,

a positive correlation between reflection and positive meaning-finding, and a

negative correlation between negative affect and reflection. They concluded

that positive affect promotes reflection (and vice versa), and that reflection

promotes positive meaning-finding. They cautioned that ‘‘a search for meaning

78

The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, 2014, Vol. 46, No. 1




that is accompanied by negative affect may prevent bereaved individuals from

receiving positive benefits from their loss’’ (p. 246). To deal with the fact that

bereaved individuals often suffer from negative affect, the authors suggested

using therapy as a tool to aid in reflection following a loss.

While reflection is beneficial in thinking about an event, rumination is its

opposite, as Williams, Teasdale, Segal, and Kabat-Zinn (2007) explained.

‘‘When we ruminate,’’ they wrote, ‘‘we become fruitlessly preoccupied with the

fact that we are unhappy and with the causes, meanings, and consequences of

our unhappiness’’ (p. 43). Reflection is a creative process that often involves

the critical examination of thoughts. As a client explained to me, reflection can

defeat the toxic effects of rumination:

It used to be that a negative thought would get hold of me and go round and

round in my head, and I would spiral down into suicidal depression. Now

when I get a negative thought, I write it down in my journal. I look at it and

reflect on it, and I realize how wrong it is.

Rumination involves preoccupation with the nadir event, a loss orientation. Its

antidote, reflection, involves a focus on life after the nadir event, a restoration

orientation. Such reflection leads to a discovery of meaning, which may be as

simple as learning to enjoy life again (Kumar, 2005). As Joseph et al. (1993)

discovered, the discovery of at least some meaning in their lives seems to be a

characteristic of disaster survivors. In a later section, I discuss therapeutic tools

to encourage reflection and meaning-making.

R

EINCORPORATION



: W

ELL


-B

EING


, M

EANING


, S

PIRITUALITY

,

W

ISDOM



,

AND


C

OMPASSION

Many survivors of the Herald of Free Enterprise and Jupiter disasters made

positive changes in their lives following these nadir experiences. They were able

to focus on life after the event (a restoration orientation) rather than the event

itself (a loss orientation). They somehow reincorporated themselves into lives

forever changed by their brush with death. Such changes did not take place

immediately of course, but disaster survivors who do not suffer psychological

trauma may actually be experiencing psychological growth (Joseph et al.,

1993). The immediate aftermath of a disaster may well be a desert or a sterile

void, but as Perls (1959/1969) pointed out, sometimes the sterile void turns into

a fertile void and ‘‘the desert starts to bloom’’ (p. 61). What characterizes this

changed landscape of the reincorporation stage?

Personal Well-Being

Tedeschi and Calhoun (1996) found that those suffering severe trauma

experienced an increase in personal well-being, especially in the areas of

appreciation of life and personal strength. They found positive change in the

areas of new possibilities and relating to others. They also found positive

Nadir Experience

79



Yüklə 126,81 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə