Ieee 802 lan/man standards Committee Plenary Meeting



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IEEE 802 LAN/MAN Standards Committee Plenary Session

July 2011 Tutorials

Monday July 18, 2011





Tutorial #1

Date: Monday, July 18, 2011

Time: 6:00 – 7:30 pm

Location: Grand Ballroom A – Street Level – Hyatt Regency San Francisco

Title: ALOHA to the Web

Sponsored by: WG 802.15 Chair, Robert Heile


Presenter(s) Name:

Affiliation:

Email Address:

Norman Abramson

University of Hawaii

norm@hawaii.edu

In June 1971 the first two way wireless transmission of data packets within a computer network was put into operation in the ALOHA Network at the Manoa campus of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. The ALOHA protocol developed in that project has since formed the basis of almost all wireless and many wired random access MAC protocols. Ethernet, WiFi, a wide variety of CSMA based protocols, DOCSIS and four generations of cellular standards trace the origins of their MAC protocols back to the ALOHA Network.



In this talk we outline and illustrate the history of the development of ALOHA channels at the University of Hawaii and the worldwide application of ALOHA. Various open questions dealing with the efficient and effective use of ALOHA in the networks of tomorrow will be discussed.





Tutorial #2

Date: Monday, July 18, 2011

Time: 7:30 – 9:00 pm

Location: Grand Ballroom A – Street Level – Hyatt Regency San Francisco

Title: Geolocation Technologies Suitable to Meet Regulatory Requirements in TV Whitespaces

Sponsored by: WG 802.22 Chair, Apurva Mody


Presenter(s) Name:

Affiliation:

Email Address:

Gerald Chouinard

CRC Canada

gerald.chouinard@crc.ca

Ivan Reede

Amerisys Inc.

I_reede@amerisys.com

Upkar Dhaliwal

InvisiTrack, Inc.

upkar@invisitrack.com

Russ Markhovsky

InvisiTrack, Inc.

rmark@invisitrack.com

Since geolocation of the terminals used by wireless communication systems is becoming important, and even mandatory in the case of TVWS operation, techniques are being considered to include this functionality in the various IEEE 802 standards. Besides the known satellite-based geolocation approaches (e.g., GPS), the TVWS operating frequencies and operating bandwidths lend themselves to efficient terrestrially-based geolocation techniques that can provide for improved geolocation accuracy as well as operation in obstructed and indoor environments. This tutorial will present terrestrial geolocation techniques for portable (nomadic) and fixed terminals.
The first technique is based on the use of OFDM modulation as implemented in a number of IEEE 802 standards where OFDM/OFDMA is taken advantage of to allow fine ranging down to a 1 meter accuracy using signals inherent in the system transmission. The technique can operate in a multipath environment where line-of-sight may be obstructed. Using the known latitude and longitude of a few reference terminals, other terminals can then be geolocated. A version of this technique has already been incorporated in the 802.22 Standard with minimal impact on complexity.
The second technique is complementary to the first one and consists in post-processing of the results acquired by the first technique to resolve multipath echo delay ambiguity. It is designed for a heavy multipath environment, for example inside buildings, with obstructed direct line-of-sight and includes multipath mitigation algorithms. These algorithms are light-weight and can be executed in software at the base station and/ or at the terminal, including portable (nomadic) terminal. In addition, this technique allows simultaneous tracking-locating of large number of terminals. The proposed techniques leverage the existing IEEE 802 Standard protocols/ infrastructure with a minimal impact (little or no change required). Alternative methods of ranging will also be discussed.




Tutorial #3

Date: Monday, July 18, 2011

Time: 9:00 – 10:30 pm

Location: Grand Ballroom A – Street Level – Hyatt Regency San Francisco

Title: NetFPGA - Rapid Prototyping of 802 Technologies

Sponsored by: 802.3 WG Chair, David Law


Presenter(s) Name:

Affiliation:

Email Address:

Sachi Sambandan

Stanford University

ssamband@stanford.edu

The NetFPGA platform (http://NetFPGA.org) was created to give our students and researchers hands-on experience building networking hardware that processes packets at line-rate. NetFPGA is a teaching tool used by undergraduate and graduate students to learn about networking hardware; and it is a development platform used by researchers to build working prototypes of high-speed, hardware-accelerated networking systems operating at line-rate.


Over two thousand NetFPGA systems are in use by 150 groups in 15 countries. The NetFPGA has been used by teachers at Stanford, Rice, Washington and Cambridge Universities in the classroom to help students learn how to build Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) switches and Internet Protocol (IP) routers. It has also been used by researchers to prototype new modules that use hardware rather than software to forward packets.
The NetFPGA platform was originally built at Stanford University with funds from NSF to support teaching of a networking class (CS344: "Build an Internet Router"). The first version of the hardware was designed in 2001 based on 10Mb/s Ethernet. Prototypes were used to teach a graduate course in 2003 and courseware for the class was made available on the web. Subsequently, we have built a 1 Gb/s version of the NetFPGA that is currently in production and just released a 10 Gb/s version.




7/11/2018



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