Kenichi Fukui Nobel Lecture



Yüklə 271,11 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix28.07.2018
ölçüsü271,11 Kb.
#59465
  1   2   3   4   5   6


THE  ROLE  OF  FRONTIER  ORBITALS

IN CHEMICAL REACTIONS

Nobel  lecture,  8  December,  1981

by

KENICHI  FUKUI



Department  of  Hydrocarbon  Chemistry,  Kyoto  University,  Sakyo-ku,

Kyoto  606,  Japan

Since  the  3rd  century  for  more  than  a  thousand  years  chemistry  has  been

thought  of  as  a  complicated,  hard-to-predict  science.  Efforts  to  improve  even  a

part  of  its  unpredictable  character  are  said  to  have  born  fruit  first  of  all  in  the

success  of  the  “electronic  theory”. This  was  founded  mainly  by  organic  chem-

ists,  such  as  Fry,  Stieglitz,  Lucas,  Lapworth  and  Sidgwick,  brought  to  a

completed  form  by  Robinson  and  Ingold,  and  developed  later  by  many  other

chemists.

1

  In  the  electronic  theory,  the  mode  of  migration  of  electrons  in



molecules  is  noted  and  is  considered  under  various  judgements.  For  that

purpose,  a  criterion  is  necessary  with  respect  to  the  number  of  electrons  which

should  originally  exist  in  an  atom  or  a  bond  in  a  molecule.  Therefore,  it  can  be

said  to  be  the  concept  by  Lewis  of  the  sharing  of  electrons  that  has  given  a  firm

basis  to  the  electronic  theory.

2

In  the  organic  electronic  theory,  the  chemical  concepts  such  as  acid  and



base,  oxidation  and  reduction  and  so  on,  have  been  conveniently  utilized  from

a  long  time  ago.  Furthermore,  there  are  terms  centring  closer  around  the

electron  concept,  such  as  electrophilicity  and  nucleophilicity,  and  electron

donor  and  acceptor  both  being  pairs  of  relative  concepts.

One  may  be  aware  that  these  concepts  can  be  connected  qualitatively  to  the

scale  of  electron  density  or  electric  charge.  In  the  electronic  theory,  the  static

and  dynamic  behaviours  of  molecules  are  explained  by  the  electronic  effects

which  are  based  on  nothing  but  the  distribution  of  electrons  in  a  molecule.

The  mode  of  charge  distribution  in  a  molecule  can  be  sketched  to  some

extent  by  the  use  of  the  electronegativity  concept  of  atoms  through  organic

chemical  experience.  At  the  same  time,  it  is  given  foundation,  made  quantita-

tive,  and  supported  by  physical  measurements  of  electron  distribution  and

theoretical  calculations  based  on  quantum  theory.

The  distribution  of  electrons  or  electric  charge  -  with  either  use  the  result  is

unchanged  -  in  a  molecule  is  usually  represented  by  the  total  numbers  (gener-

ally  not  integer)  of  electrons  in  each  atom  and  each  bond,  and  it  was  a  concept

easily  acceptable  even  to  empirical  chemists  as  having  a  tolerably  realistic

meaning.  Therefore,  chemists  employed  the  electron  density  as  a  fundamental

concept  to  explain  or  to  comprehend  various  phenomena.  In  particular,  for  the

purpose  of  promoting  chemical  investigations,  researchers  usually  rely  upon

the  analogy  through  experience,  and  the  electron  density  was  very  effectively

and  widely  used  as  the  basic  concept  in  that  analogy.




10

Chemistry  1981

When  the  magnitude  of  electron  density  is  adopted  as  the  criterion  the

electrostatic  attraction  and  repulsion  caused  by  the  electron  density  are  taken

into  account.  Therefore,  it  is  reasonable  to  infer  that  an  electrophilic  reagent

will  attack  the  position  of  large  electron  density  in  a  molecule  while  a  nucleo-

philic  reaction  will  occur  at  the  site  of  small  electron  density.  In  fact,  Wheland

and  Pauling

3

  explained  the  orientation  of  aromatic  substitutions  in  substituted



benzenes  along  these  lines,  and  theoretical  interpretations  of  the  mode  of  many

other  chemical  reactions  followed  in  the  same  fashion.

However,  the  question  why  one  of  the  simple  reactions  known  from  long

before,  the  electrophilic  substitution  in  naphthalene,  for  instance,  such  as

nitration,  yields 

α-substituted  derivatives  predominantly  was  not  so  easy  to

answer.  That  was  because,  in  many  of  such  unsubstituted  aromatic  hydrocar-

bons,  both  the  electrophile  and  the  nucleophile  react  at  the  same  location.  This

point  threw  some  doubt  on  the  theory  of  organic  reactivity,  where  the  electron

density  was  thought  to  do  everything.

THE  CONCEPT  OF  FRONTIER  ORBITAIL  INTERACTIONS

The  interpretation  of  this  problem  was  attempted  by  many  people  from  various

different  angles.  Above  all,  Coulson  and  Longuet-Higgins

took  up  the



change  of  electron  density  distribution  under  the  influence  of  approaching

reagent.  The  explanation  by  Wheland

5

  was  based  on  the  calculation  of  the



energy  required  to  localize  electrons  forcibly  to  the  site  of  reaction.  But  I  myself

tried  to  attack  this  problem  in  a  way  which  was  at  that  time  slightly  unusual,

Taking  notice  of  the  principal  role  played  by  the  valence  electrons  in  the  case  of

the  molecule  formation  from  atoms,  only  the  distribution  of  the  electrons

occupying  the  highest  energy 

π orbital  of  aromatic  hydrocarbons  was  calculat-

ed.  The  attempt  resulted  in  a  better  success  than  expected,  obtaining  an  almost

perfect  agreement  between  the  actual  position  of  electrophilic  attack  and  the

site  of  large  density  of  these  specified  electrons  as  exemplified  in  Fig.  1.

6

Fig.  1.  Nitration  of  naphthalene.





Yüklə 271,11 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə