Microsoft Word Ksi\271\277ka abstrakt\363w doc



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə113/173
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü20,03 Mb.
#80416
1   ...   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   ...   173

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
236
T2: P–21 
Alkali metal salts of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid): 
spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and biological studies 
 
Monika Kalinowska
1
, Ewelina Bajko
2
, and Włodzimierz Lewandowski
1
 
 

Division of Chemistry, Bialystok University of Technology, Wiejska 45E Street,  15-351 Bialystok, 
Poland, m.kalinowska@pb.edu.pl 

Faculty of Forestry, Bialystok University of Technology, Pilsudskiego 1A Street,, 17-200 Hajnówka, 
Poland 
  
 
Chlorogenic  acids  are  mono-,  di-,  tri-  or  tetra  esters  of  one  or  more  cinnamic  acids  and 
quinic  acid,  sometimes  with  an  aliphatic  acid  replacing  a  cinnamic  acid  residue.  5-O-
Caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA, common name: chlorogenic acid) is one of the major chlorogenic 
acids  present  in  plant  extracts  with  high  biological  importance.  The  synthesis  of  alkali  metal 
salts of chlorogenic acid is intended to obtain new compounds with increased solubility in water 
medium,  lipophilicity,  and  different  biological  activity  compared  to  ligand.  The  molecular 
structure of alkali metal chlorogenates was described by means of FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV/VIS, 
1H  and 
13
C  NMR  spectroscopy.  The  elemental  and  thermogravimetric  analysis  were  used  in 
order to establish the composition of chlorogenates.. The DPPH∙ and FRAP assays were used to 
preliminary estimation of the antioxidant properties of synthesized compounds and ligand. The 
antioxidant  capacity  was  express  by  EC
50
  parameters  (concentration  required  to  obtain  a  50% 
antioxidant effect). 
 
Keywords: chlorogenic acid; phenolic compounds; antioxidant, spectroscopy 
 
Acknowledgment 
This  work  was  funded  by  the  National  Science  Centre  (Poland)  on  the  basis  of  the  decision  number 
DEC2013/11/D/NZ9/02774 
 
References  
[1] 
E. Bajko, M.  Kalinowska,  P.  Borowski,  L  Siergiejczyk,  W.  Lewandowski,  LWT  -  Food  Sci.  T.  65 
(2016) 471.
 
[2]  M.  Kalinowska,  A.  Witkowska,  H.  Lewandowska-Siwkiewicz,  W.  Lewandowski,  Plant  Physiol. 
Bioch. 84 (2014) 169.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XIV
h
 International Conference on Molecular Spectroscopy, Białka Tatrzańska 2017
 
 
237
T2: P–22 
Raman spectroscopy investigation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease 
at single cell level 
 
Ewelina Szafraniec
1
, Bożena Kukla
1
, Edyta Kuś
2

Stefan Chlopicki
3
, and Malgorzata Baranska
1,2
 
 

Faculty of Chemistry,Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, Krakow, Poland, 
e-mail: baranska@chemia.uj.edu.pl 

Jagiellonian Centre for Experimental Therapeutics (JCET), Jagiellonian University, Bobrzynskiego 
14, Krakow, Poland 

Chair
 
of
 
Pharmacology,
 
Jagiellonian
 
University
 
Medical
 
College,
 
Grzegorzecka
 
16,
 
Krakow,
 
Poland.
 
 
 
 
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the manifestations of metabolic syndrome, 
and  its  worldwide  prevalence  is  continually  increasing.  NAFLD  is  manifested  primarily  by  an 
increased  accumulation  of  lipids  within  hepatic  tissue  and  is  known  to  be  strongly  associated  with 
insulin  resistance,  obesity,  hypertension  and  atherosclerosis.1,2  NAFLD  pathogenesis  involves  an 
alteration of a cross-talk between various cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), 
hepatic stellate cells (HSC)) in liver tissue and involves changes in their phenotype. In a healthy liver, 
fenestrated  LSECs  without  a  basement  membrane  facilitate  transport  of  macromolecules  between 
blood  and  hepatocytes,  and  maintains  liver  homeostasis  by  balanced  production  of  mediators. 
Hepatocytes  possess  microvilli  while  quiescent  HSC  stores  vitamin  A  .  Paracrine  action  of 
hepatocytes  and  HSC  maintains  fenestrated  phenotype  of  LSECs  by  vascular  endothelial  growth 
factor (VEGF) production.  In NAFLD  liver,  LSECs porosity is reduced  with  presence of basement 
membrane.  An  activated  HSC  loses  vitamin  A  and  changed  and  changes  phenotype  towards 
myofibroblasts.  Fat-loaded  hepatocytes  lose  the  hepatocytes  microvilli.  In  addition,  the  cellular 
signaling is shifted towards proinflamatory and profibrogenic pathway.3 Those alteration in cellular 
cross-talk, however do not explain entirely the pathogenetic mechanism of NAFLD, which is still not 
fully understood yet. NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), 
which  is  a  more  severe  form,  and  can  lead  to  fibrosis,  cirrhosis,  and  eventually  to  hepatocellular 
carcinoma.  Therefore,  better  understanding  of  NAFLD  pathogenesis,  early  diagnosis  and 
management of NAFLD are crucial for improving the patient prognosis. 
 
Raman  imaging  possesses  a  number  of  advantages,  including  minimal  sample  preparation, 
nondestructivity  together  with  the  possibility  to  obtain  information  of  overall  biochemical 
composition of the sample. Raman spectroscopy provides information on the structure of vibrational 
levels  related  to  the  bonds  in  the  molecules,  as  it  is  based  on  the  study  of  transitions  between 
vibrational  levels  of  molecules  by  their  interaction  with  the  incident  radiation.  Analysis  of  Raman 
spectrum  enables  an  identification  of  single  components  of  the  sample,  and  together  with  digital 
imaging it is possible to obtain information of spatial distribution of chosen components. High spatial 
resolution attainable by Raman imaging enables investigations of single cells at the subcellular level4. 
In  addition,  combining  Raman  spectroscopic  imaging  with  chemometric  methods  (k-means  cluster 
analysis, principal component analysis) allows for analysis of different cellular compartments. 
 
Here  we  present  a  unique  approach  based  on  a  protocol  of  cell  isolation  from  murine  liver 
followed by Raman imaging of single cell at subcellular level. Such approach was implemented to the 
study changes in biochemical content of freshly isolated primary LSECs and hepatocytes in a murine 
model of NAFLD at different stages of disease progression. 
 
Keywords: Raman imaging; LSEC; hepatocytes; NAFLD 
 
Acknowledgment 
This work was supported by National Science Centre, grant Symfonia No. No DEC-2015/16/W/NZ4/00070. 
 
References  
[1]  M. Miyao, et. al., Laboratory Investigation 00 (2015) 1. 
[2]  C. Michiels, J. Cell. Physiol., 196 (2003) 430. 
[3]  E. Maslak, A. Gregorius, S. Chlopicki, Pharmacological Reports 67 (2015) 689. 
[4]  K. Galler. Integr. Biol. 6 (2014) 946. 



Yüklə 20,03 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   ...   173




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə