Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə63/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   ...   114

Jehoram the son of Ahab reportedly began to reign in the second year
of the reign of Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat (see
2 Kings 1.17). But
the ‘Chronicles of the Kings of Judah’ stated that Jehoram, son of
Jehoshaphat began to reign in the ¢fth year of the reign of Jehoram, son
of Ahab (ibid.,
8.16). Again, anyone who undertakes to compare the
accounts in the book of Chronicles with those of the books of Kings will
¢nd many other similar discrepancies, which I do not need to survey
here, and I certainly do not need to review the manoeuvres of those
writers who try to reconcile them. The rabbis talk evident nonsense. The
commentators I have read fantasize, fabricate and completely distort the
language. For example, where
2 Chronicles
15
says,‘Ahaziah was forty-two
years old when he began to reign,’ some forge a ¢ction whereby these
years have their beginning from the reign of Omri and not from the
birth of Ahaziah. If they could show that this was the intent of the author
of Chronicles, I would not hesitate to say that the latter did not know
how to express himself. They make up a good many other such things. If
they were true, I would state categorically that the ancient Hebrews were
totally ignorant both of their own language and of the art of constructing
an orderly narrative, and I would not accept that there is any method or rule
for interpreting Scripture, but anyone could make up anything he liked.
[
12] If anyone thinks that I am
135
speaking here too generally and without
adequate grounds for what I say, I challenge him to try the thing himself
and show us a genuine order in these histories which historians could
emulate in writing chronological narratives without going astray. In inter-
preting the stories and attempting to reconcile them, I ask him to pay close
attention to the speci¢c language and to the ways in which things are
expressed and the topics arranged and connected, explaining them in such
a way that we too could emulate them in our own writing, following his
explanation.
16
Should he succeed, I will without hesitation concede defeat,
and for me he ‘will be the great Apollo’.
17
I confess that I have not been able
to ¢nd anything like this, despite a long search. I say nothing here that
I have not long been pondering deeply, and despite being steeped in the
common beliefs about the Bible from childhood on, I have not been able to
resist my conclusion. But there is no reason to detain the reader longer on
15
2 Chronicles 22.2.
16
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
18.
17
Virgil, Eclogues
3.104: ‘eris mihi magnus Apollo’.
Theological-Political Treatise
136


this topic and challenge him to undertake an enterprise bound to fail. All
I needed was to propose the thing, so as to set out my meaning more
clearly. I now move on to the other issues I undertook to discuss, con-
cerning the fate of these books.
[
13] For besides what we have just proved, we must also take account of
the fact that these books have not been preserved by later ages with such
care that no errors have crept in. Ancient scribes noticed several dubious
readings and some mutilated passages, though not all of them. I am not
here discussing whether the errors are serious enough to cause major dif-
¢culty for the reader though I do believe that they are of little signi¢cance
at any rate for those who peruse the Scriptures with a more open mind. I
can certainly say that I have not noticed any error or variant reading con-
cerning moral doctrine which would render it obscure or ambiguous. But
there are many people who do not allow that any fault has entered in even
on other questions, adopting the stance that by a certain special provi-
dence God has preserved the entire Bible uncorrupted. They assert that
variant readings are indications of the most profound mysteries, and
maintain the same about the twenty-eight asterisks, all of which occur in
the middle of a paragraph, and even insist that fabulous secrets are con-
tained in the accents on the letters. I do not know whether they a⁄rm this
from foolishness and doddering devotion or from pride and malice, so that
people would believe that they alone know God’s secrets, but this I do
know: I have read nothing in them that sounds like a deep secret, rather it
is all very childish. I have also read, and
136
personally know, some people who
dabble in Cabbalism; the stupidity of whom is beyond belief.
[
14] As for the fact that errors have crept in, as we said, I think no
sensible person can doubt it if he has read the passage about Saul (which
I cited above from
1 Samuel 13.1) and also 2 Samuel 6.2,‘And David and
the whole people that were with him arose and went from Judah, so that
they might take the ark of God from there’. Anyone can see in this pas-
sage that the place they went to, Kirjat Jeharim,
18
from which they were
to take the ark, has dropped out. We cannot deny that
2 Samuel 13.37
has also been scrambled and mutilated: ‘And Absalom £ed and went to
Talmai, the son of Ammihud, king of Geshur, and mourned for his son
18
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
19.
Further queries
137


every day, and Absalom £ed and went to Geshur and stayed there for
three years’.
19
I remember noticing other such passages which will not
come back to me at the moment.
[
15] That the marginal notes which occur throughout the Hebrew MSS
were doubtful readings, cannot be questioned by anyone who sees that
most of them have arisen owing to the great similarity of Hebrew letters
with each other. I refer, for example, to the similarity of kaf and bet, yad and
vav, dalet and resh, and so on.When
2 Samuel 5.24 gives,‘and at that’ (time)
‘at which you will hear’, there is a note in the margin,‘when you will hear’.
At Judges
21.22,‘and when their fathers or their brothers come to us in
multitude’ (i.e.‘often’)’ etc., there is a marginal note,‘in order to complain’.
Many such errors have also arisen from the use of the letters which they
call silent letters , i.e., letters whose pronunciation is often not felt and are
confused with one another. For example, at Leviticus
25.30 the text is,‘and
the house that is in the city which has no wall will be guaranteed’, but in the
margin we ¢nd,‘which has a wall’, and so on.
[
16] But although these things are clear enough in themselves, we would
like to answer the claims of certain Pharisees who try to persuade us that
the marginal notes were added or indicated by the biblical writers them-
selves to signify some mystery. They take the ¢rst of these arguments
(which I do not ¢nd very persuasive) from the custom of reading the
Scriptures aloud. If, they say, these notes were put beside the text because
there was a variety of readings and later generations were unable to delete
either of them, why did it become the custom always to retain the marginal
sense? Why, they say, did they
137
write the sense that they wanted to retain in
the margin? On the contrary, they should have written the scrolls them-
selves as they wanted them to be read instead of writing in the margin the
sense and reading of which they most approved.
The second argument appears to have some plausibility, being taken
from the actual nature of the phenomenon: namely, that errors creep into
codices not by design but by chance and whatever happens in that way
happens randomly. But in the Five Books of Moses the word ‘girl’ is
invariably (with one exception) written defectively, contrary to the rules of
grammar, without the letter he while, on the contrary, in the margin it
19
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
20.
Theological-Political Treatise
138




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə