Governance and Democracy katarsis survey Paper



Yüklə 0,72 Mb.

səhifə4/35
tarix20.09.2017
ölçüsü0,72 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   35

 

ix

 



 

 

 



 

B

B

O

O

X

X

 

 

a

a

n

n

d

d

 

 

T

T

A

A

B

B

L

L

E

E

S

S

 

 

 

BOX 1  



Main Exclusionary Dynamics ............................................................. 15

 

BOX 2  



Socially Creative Strategies "out" of Exclusion .................................. 16

 

TABLE 1   Modalities of Democracy .................................................................... 19



 

TABLE 2   Modalities of Governance ................................................................... 23

 

TABLE 3   Types of Multi-level Governance and Politics of Scale ...................... 70



 

 




GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY 

 KATARIS PROJECT



 

 

 



 

 

 



xi

A

A

B

B

S

S

T

T

R

R

A

A

C

C

T

T

 

 

Although the welfare state is currently being transformed, it continues to exist in new forms. 

These vary in different cities and regions. They have in common to involve citizenry in micro-

participation, while managing macro-participation by the elite. Especially community-based 

management and participatory democracy turn out to be concepts for socially innovative 

strategies which are fundamentally Janus-faced, as they tend to be strategically selective – 

including some actors, while excluding others. Critical social movements may be co-opted into 

the state and lose their potential to contest political decision. But bottom-up participation can 

also be a step towards the proposed utopia of democratic governance. 

Bernhard Leubolt 

Andreas Novy 

Barbara Beinstein 

 



GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY 

 KATARIS PROJECT



 

13

 



 

 

 



 

I

I

N

N

T

T

R

R

O

O

D

D

U

U

C

C

T

T

I

I

O

O

N

N

 

 

This paper contains some findings of the project “KATARSIS – Growing Inequality and 

Social Innovation: Alternative Knowledge and Practice in Overcoming Social Exclusion in 

Europe” (



http://katarsis.ncl.ac.uk

http://katarsis.ncl.ac.uk

) which was financed by the European Commission within 

the Sixth Framework Programme on “Citizens and Governance in a Knowledge-based 

Society”. 

KATARSIS worked as an interdisciplinary platform on which research teams 

specialised in the study of the consequences of growing inequality and social exclusion 

exchanged their knowledge and work towards a better integration of their research 

programmes and methodologies among each other. Additionally, practitioners from local 

governments, social movements, NGOs and so forth collaborated with their ground based 

knowledge. Within the resulting transdisciplinary framework, the thematic focus has been on a 

unique type of response to growing exclusion, namely the creative and socially innovative 

strategies by which people react to conditions of exclusion. This paper was part of a literature 

survey, covering five existential fields: (1) Labour Market and Social Economy, (2) Education 

and Training, (3) Housing and Neighbourhood, (4) Health and Environment, and (5) the field 

of this paper: Governance and Democracy. Besides the survey of the relevant academic 

literature to governance and democracy, the first steps towards linking theories to actor’s 

strategies were taken by introducing case studies, which were taken as contradictory examples 

where socially innovative strategies have taken place. 

“Governance and democracy” (WP 1.5) is an existential field of KATARSIS that differs from 

the other four in an important respect. While these focus on specific loci of socioeconomic 

inequality the issues covered in WP 1.5 have a double role – they are examined as specific loci 

of social exclusion and as processes leading to social inclusion or exclusion in other fields. 

This approach is based on the understanding that social exclusion (and therefore social 

inclusion as well) has two dimensions – a content and a process dimension. This 

differentiation is reflected in the discussion about “exclusion from” or “exclusion through” in 

the other existential fields and can be traced back to two different underlying ideals of social 

justice. When targeting “exclusion through” the focus is on equality of opportunity, while 

fighting “exclusion from” needs to rest on some notion of equality of outcome. Interestingly 

enough, Labonte (2004: 119) argues that these different conceptions of social justice are also 

what differentiates the concepts of social inclusion (focus on equality of opportunity) and 

social exclusion (focus on (in)equality of outcome). However, discourses on social exclusion 

tend to be mainly concerned with the content dimension of social inequality whilst those 

concerned with social inclusion focus on creating equal opportunities (process dimension).  





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   35


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə