Heat recovery


Next-generation chemical refining with



Yüklə 116,32 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə4/7
tarix18.04.2022
ölçüsü116,32 Kb.
#85567
1   2   3   4   5   6   7
14-amaliy, курсовая муратовой Ситоры ту25 (Unicode Encoding Conflict 1)
5.2

Next-generation chemical refining with

nanoneutralisation

Edible oils can be refined by either a chemical or a physical refining process.

Chemical refining is still the most widely applied process for soft oils with

low free fatty acid (FFA) content (soybean oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil

etc.). The main byproduct of chemical refining is the so-called soapstock,

which is a mixture of fatty acid soaps, salts, phospholipids, impurities and

entrained neutral oil. Soapstock is usually split with sulfuric acid, resulting in

a low value, difficult-to-valorise ‘acid oil’ and a difficult-to-treat wastewater

stream. The high neutral oil losses in the soapstock (especially when crude

oils with higher FFA and phospholipid contents are chemically refined), the

low value of the resulting acid oil and the stricter environmental legislation

(making wastewater treatment more expensive) are the main reasons for oil

processors to consider physical refining. On the other hand, chemical refining

is quite forgiving towards crude oil quality and it usually gives a good refined

oil quality. For these reasons, it is still the preferred refining process for many

processors, and it is not expected that chemical refining will disappear. Hence,

there will remain a serious interest in new developments that make chemical

refining more attractive.

At the end of the 1990s, several new neutralisation processes, such as

soluble silicate refining (Hernandez & Rathbone, 2002), dry refining with

CaO (Meyers, 2000) and chemical refining with KOH, were developed. All

these developments aimed at the (partial) elimination of the washing step

and a better valorisation of the soapstock. Unfortunately, none of them were



5.2

NEXT-GENERATION CHEMICAL REFINING WITH NANONEUTRALISATION



129

finally implemented in industrial practice as the valorisation potential of

Ca/K soaps was lower than expected, and soapstock-related problems thus

remained unsolved.

In the last decade, process improvements in chemical neutralisation focused

on increasing process automation and the use of better, more powerful mixing

systems. This resulted in an overall better process control and the need for less

(excess) chemicals. However, these developments did not have a significant

positive impact on neutralised oil yield, and the need for acid pretreatment

and excess caustic still remains.

In the search for a new neutralisation process that could further reduce

the use of (excess) chemicals and oil losses in soapstock, the potential

of so-called Nano Reactor

®

technology was investigated. Nano Reactors



®

are hydrodynamic cavitation reactors. Their working principle and possible

applications in the chemical industry (for process intensification), biotech-

nology (cell disruption) and drinking water treatment (microbial disinfection

and degradation of contaminants) are well described in recent literature

(Cogate, 2010).

The use of ultrasound cavitation (created by a cavitational effect) for edible

oil degumming was studied by Moulton & Mounts (1990). Although the

results were promising, this process was never industrially applied due to

some inherent drawbacks: (1) no uniform cavitational effect; (2) very high

energy requirement; and (3) applicability only as a batch process.

Hydrodynamic Nano Reactors

®

are inherently more suitable for use in



large scale oil processing as these can be used in continuous operation

and require less energy. As a first industrial application, nanoneutralisation

was recently developed and successfully introduced in edible oil processing

(Svenson & Willits, 2012). A typical process flow diagram is given in Figure 5.1.

Crude or water degummed oil is blended with the caustic solution and then

transferred by a high-pressure feed pump through the Nano Reactors

®

at

a typical pressure of 40–80 bar. The combination of this high pressure and



the unique internal design of the Nano Reactors

®

creates a high turbulence



and strong shear forces, resulting in a very good mixing of the crude oil and

the caustic solution in the Nano Reactor

®

. Discharge pressure is 3–4 bar,



which allows direct feeding of the nanotreated oil to the centrifugal separator.

Afterwards, the nanoneutralised oil can flow on to the water washing or silica

treatment process.

The proven industrial advantages of the nanoneutralisation process are a

significant reduction (up to 90%) in phosphoric/citric acid consumption and

a corresponding significant reduction (over 30%) of caustic soda use. The

latter is due to the lower acid consumption and the very good mixing effect

in the Nano Reactors

®

, which render nonhydratable phospholipids more




130

CH 5


EDIBLE OIL REFINING: CURRENT AND FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES

Steam


Deodorized Oil

Acid


Caustic

Deodorized Oil

Acid Reaction

Tank


NANO

REACTOR


High Pressure

Feed Pump

Soap

Centrifuge



Soapstock

Wash


water

Washing


Centrifuge

Water


Optional

Neutralized

Oil

Steam


Steam

Simplified Nano Neutralization flowsheet

To storage

CRUDE OIL




Yüklə 116,32 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə