Oliver Joseph Lodge, 1851 1940



Yüklə 219,38 Kb.

səhifə1/7
tarix24.12.2017
ölçüsü219,38 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7



OLIVER  JOSEPH  LODGE

1851-1940



F

r o m

 

the point o f view o f the advancement o f natural knowledge, 

the chief standards o f attainment are those o f original thought and 

productive  discovery  based  upon  it.  The  results  o f activities  to 

which these standards are supplied are recorded in the publications 

o f  scientific  societies  and  make  up  the  material  o f  specialized 

history. Clear interpretation o f any part o f this rich store o f know ­

ledge  not  only  directs  and  stimulates  further  enquiries,  but  also 

extends  interest  in  scientific  endeavour  and  achievement.  As  a 

pioneer  explorer  who  added  new  territories  to  the  realm  o f 

science,  Sir Oliver Lodge will always occupy a high and honoured 

place  among  original  investigators.  His  contributions  to  the 

transactions  o f scientific  societies,  distinguished  as  they  were  and 

informed  by  his  highly  original  and  distinctive  cast  o f  mind, 

afford,  however,  no  adequate  measure  o f his  inspiring  influence 

on  the  scientific  w ork  and  thought  o f his  age.  It  is  by  the  fruits 

o f his  spirit,  as  much  as  by  his  additions  to  knowledge,  that  he 

w ould  wish  the  memory  o f his  life  to  be  cherished.

Oliver Joseph  Lodge  was  born  at  Penkhull,  near  Stoke-upon- 

Trent,  on  12 June  1851.  Both  his  grandfathers  were  clergymen 

and  schoolmasters,  and  Lodge’s  life  and  interests  showed  that  he 

inherited their characteristics.  O n the maternal side,  the daughters 

o f his  grandfather,  the  Rev. Joseph  Heath,  possessed  remarkable 

natural  ability  and  educational  acquirements.  A  son  o f  one, 

Percy  Heawood,  became  professor  o f  mathematics  in  the 

University  o f  Durham,  and  another  son,  Edward  Heawood, 

was  for  many years  librarian  to  the  Royal  Geographical  Society, 

where  he  became  an  authority  on  cartography.  Lodge’s  mother 

was  the  youngest  daughter,  and  she,  with  his  aunt,  Charlotte 

Anne  Heath,  were  the  formative  influences  which  shaped  his 

early  intellectual  life.



552

OBITUARY  NOTICES

His  paternal  grandfather,  the  Rev.  Oliver  Lodge,  was  bom   in 

Ireland  and  became  vicar  o f Barking,  in  Essex,  as  well  as  head­

master  o f Barking  School.  He  had  twenty-five  children,  Lodge’s 

father,  Oliver,  being  the  twenty-third.  O f the  sons  o f the  Rev. 

Oliver  Lodge,  the  eldest  became  a  clergyman,  another  was 

mathematical  master  at Lucton  School,  in  Hertfordshire,  and  the 

youngest was for many years headmaster o f Horncastle Grammar 

School  in  Lincolnshire  and  later  Canon  o f Lincoln  and  R ector 

o f Scrivelsby.

Lodge’s  father,  after  a  short  period  as  an  ‘apprentice’  to  an 

uncle who was a medical practitioner in London, entered a railway 

office  and  later  established  a  successful  business  as  agent  for  clays 

and  other  materials  used  in  the  Potteries  and  the  Five  Towns. 

He  was  anxious  that  Lodge  should  succeed  him  in  this  business 

and  kept his eldest son in it for several years.  During  this  period, 

however,  Lodge  managed  to  find  time  to  educate  himself  in 

scientific  and  other  subjects,  and  when  he  was  twenty-two  years 

o f age  he  decided  to  leave  business  life,  much  against  his  father’s 

wish.  It  was  then  that  he  entered  University  College,  London, 

to  devote  his  life  to  science.

Lodge  and  his  brother  Alfred  matriculated  at  the  University 

o f  London  in  1871,  when  they  were  respectively  twenty  and 

seventeen  years  o f  age.  Tw o  years  later,  Alfred  obtained  an 

exhibition  at  Magdalen  College,  Oxford,  and  another  brother, 

Richard,  was  awarded  an  exhibition  at  Balliol  College.  Lodge 

just  missed  obtaining  an  exhibition  at  St  John’s  College, 

Cambridge,  the  award  being  made  to  Milnes  Marshall,  the 

biological  candidate.  Alfred  Lodge  was  elected  to  a  Fereday 

fellowship  at  St  John’s  College,  Oxford,  in  1876,  and  was  for 

many  years  professor  o f pure  mathematics  at  the  Royal  Indian 

Engineering  College,  Coopers  Hill.  Sir  Richard  Lodge,  the 

distinguished  historian,  became  professor  o f  history  in  the 

University  o f  Edinburgh.  The  three  brothers  thus  made  good 

use  o f  the  intellectual  heritage  w ith  which  their  ancestors  had 

endowed  them.

W hen  he  was  eight  years  o f  age,  Lodge  entered  N ew port



Gram m ar  School,  in  Shropshire.  An  uncle  by  marriage  was 

second  master  at  the  school,  and  Lodge  became  a  boarder  in  his 

house.  The  school  was  then  o f  a  very  old-fashioned  type  and 

the  system  o f  education  was  wholly  classical,  w ith  conditions 

o f life and learning which would be regarded to-day as unsuitable 

for  children  o f any  social  class.  It  is  no  wonder,  therefore,  that 

Lodge says in his autobiography, ‘M y schooldays were undoubtedly 

the  most  miserable  part  o f my  life’.  He  was  only  four  years  at 

N ew port,  and  then  became  one  o f three  private  pupils  w ith  the 

same  relative,  who  had  been  appointed  rector  o f  Combs,  in 

Suffolk.  Two  years  later,  at  fourteen  years  o f age,  he  was  taken 

away  from   this  tutorial  instruction  at  Combs  Rectory,  and 

entered  his  father’s  business  o f potters’  merchant.  For  the  next 

seven years o f his life, Lodge’s daily occupation was  that o f book­

keeper  and  travelling  representative  in  this  business.

All w ork in  the school was  o f the nature o f linguistic exercises 

and  grammatical  values,  good  as  foundations  for  intelligent 

reading  o f  classical  authors  but  uninspiring  when  merely 

drudgery  w ithout  a  meaning.  Latin  and  Greek,  geometry, 

geography  and  history  were  used  to  exercise  the  memory,  but 

little  more.  Classical  authors  were  never  treated  as  literature  but 

as  models  o f composition  to  be  learned  by  heart  with  rules  o f 

accidence  and  syntax  to  be  applied  mechanically  in  language 

structure.  At  school  Lodge  absorbed  nothing  o f  the  spirit  and 

human  interest  o f  Virgil  and  Homer,  and  his  introduction  to 

poetry  o f  any  kind  was  when  a  sister  o f  the  rector  at  Combs 

read  to him and another pupil  ‘The Lay o f the Last Minstrel’  and 

‘The  Lady  o f the  Lake’  which  enthralled  them  both.  W hen  he 

was  twelve  years  old  his  aunt  Anne  first  introduced  him  to 

science  through  astronomy.  By  means  o f  a  celestial  globe  he 

learned  to  identify  the  chief constellations  and  the  stars  in  them, 

using  a  dark  lantern  to  consult  the  globe  at  night  when  the  sky 

was clear. He was given Mitchell’s 

of Heaven to read; and the 

account o f the work o f pioneer astronomers in this  book led him 

in  later  years  to  write  the  amplified  description  contained  in  his 

Pioneers  of Science.

OLIVER  JOSEPH  LODGE 

5 5 3





Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə