Oliver Joseph Lodge, 1851 1940



Yüklə 219,38 Kb.

səhifə7/7
tarix24.12.2017
ölçüsü219,38 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

must  be  subject  to  critical  examination  by  competent  authorities; 

and he always welcomed any such aids to the fractional distillation 

o f the  spirit  o f truth  from  material  which  he  believed  contained 

the  essence  o f it.  After  many  years  o f study  and  experiment,  he 

deemed  that  he  had  ascertained  evidence  o f the  reality  o f a  realm 

beyond  physics  and  endeavoured  to  understand  its  human  mean­

ing.  In his  psychical research work,  he followed  the  same  method 

o f critical enquiry  and  cautious  conclusion  as  that  upon  which  all 

scientific  investigation  must  be  based.

It  follows  that  the  records  obtained  by  him  in  the  psychical 

field  must  be  given  the  same  consideration  as  those  o f observed 

results  o f other  experiments.  This  is  the  attitude  taken  by  every 

scientific  society  towards  the  account  o f  any  original  research 

presented  to  it  by  a  responsible  investigator.  W ithout  this 

confidence  in  faithful  testimony,  it  would  be  impossible  to  build 

up  a  structure  o f  scientific  knowledge.  W hether  experiments 

are well-designed  and  crucial,  or  whether interpretations  o f them 

are  convincing,  is,  however,  a  legitimate  subject  for  criticism.

Many  psychical  researchers  are  content  to  collect  evidence  o f 

unusual  ultra-physical  experiences  o f all  kinds  with  the  view  of 

sifting  from  it  a  few  grains  o f gold  which  will  lead  them  to  the 

lode they are seeking.  Others are prospectors looking  for promis­

ing  sites  upon  which  to  sink  their  shafts.  In  each  o f these  groups 

the  value  o f the  ore  is  assayed  by  the  discoverers  themselves  and 

is  given  sterling  significance  as  a  medium  o f  exchange.  A 

scientific  explorer  is,  however,  not  satisfied  in  obtaining  such 

rewards  o f  sustained  effort:  he  wishes  also  to  know  the  true 

nature  o f the  mineral  and  its  relation  to  the  earth’s  structure.  He 

has,  therefore,  to  construct  in  his  own  mind  an  explanation  or 

hypothesis  which  will  account for  the  existence  and  origin  o f the 

noble  metal  recovered  by  him.

Lodge,  like  all  men  o f science,  clearly  distinguished  between 

ascertained  evidence  and  hypothesis  to  interpret  its  meaning. 

The  accurate  observations  o f  celestial  bodies  made  in  ancient 

Egypt  and  Mesopotamia  have  survived  many  hypotheses  con­

ceived  then  and  later  to  explain  them.  Such  hypotheses  change



OLIVER  JOSEPH  LODGE 

5 6 9


570

OBITUARY  NOTICES

w ith  the  advance  o f  scientific  knowledge:  they  are  verified  or 

discarded  according  to  their  capacity  to  account  for  facts  o f 

observation.  The  Ptolemaic  and  other  astronomical  systems  thus 

gave  place  to  the  Copernican  theory  o f  celestial  movements. 

Hypotheses  which  relate  to  causes  o f  phenomena  belong  to  a 

different  category.  It  is  impossible,  for  example,  to  establish  by 

observation how the solar system came into existence or what was 

the  origin  o f life.  A  hypothesis  may,  however,  be  serviceable  to 

science,  even  though  it  is  not  directly  verifiable,  because  it 

correlates  phenomena  and  suggests  directions  o f further enquiry. 

The whole o f ultra-microscopic physics is based upon hypothetical 

considerations  which  are  unverifiable  because  the  ultimate  units 

and  events  cannot  be  directly  observed,  but  only  their  effects  or 

sense-impressions.

Lodge  was  convinced  that  the  phenomena  he  had  observed 

in  the  meta-atomic field  were  sufficient  to justify  a  hypothesis  to 

correlate,  if not  to  explain,  them.  He  knew  very  well  that  other 

psychical  researchers  explained  the  same  type  o f  observation 

in a  different way,  and  realized  that his  hypothesis  was not  o f the 

nature o f an  unchangeable  creed  but an explanation which m ight 

have  to  be  revised  or  discarded  in  the  light  o f fuller  knowledge. 

His  view  was  that  the  evidence  he  had  obtained  justified  the 

conception  o f  the  hypothesis  o f  survival  o f  human  personality 

after  physical  death  and  the  reality  o f  communication  w ith 

discarnate  minds  through  sensitive  living  receivers.  Another 

group  o f psychical  investigators  would  explain  the  revelations  as 

having  their  origin  in  telepathy.  W hich  o f  these  hypotheses 

represents  the  nearer  approach  to  truth  must  depend  at  present 

upon  personal  knowledge  and judgm ent.  All  that  can  be  said  is 

that  if mind  exists  apart  from  matter,  the  inevitable  conclusion 

must  be  that  reached  by  Lodge  and  now   accepted  by  most 

authorities  in  the  field  o f psychical  research.

The  spiritistic  hypothesis  was  accepted  by  Lodge  to  account 

for a large number of,  as it seemed to him,  otherwise inexplicable 

facts  o f observation  and  experiment.  According  to  it,  the  human 

body  is  the  transient  centre  o f  activity  o f  an  influence  which



existed  before,  and  continues  after,  organic  life.  W e  are  allr 

therefore,  spirits  operating  on  material  bodies  for  a  time,  but  our 

real  existence  does  not  depend  upon  our  association  w ith  matter. 

The potential permanent part o f us is spirit,  and it always operates 

upon  the  material  through  the  ether.  All  our  actions  on  matter 

are  conducted  through  this  entity  and  may  be  continued  in  the 

same  sort  o f way  through  etheric  mechanism  when  the  body  has 

disappeared.  In  other  words,  human  beings  are  immortal  spirits 

in  temporary  association  with  matter.

It  was  F.  W .  H.  Myers  who  convinced  Lodge  that  obscure 

psychical  phenomena  could  be  legitimately  investigated  by 

observation  and  experiment,  and  be  regarded  as  part  o f a  suffici­

ently  comprehensive  scheme  o f  natural  knowledge.  In  his 

psychical  researches,  Myers  followed  truly  scientific  methods  in 

his  ascertainment  o f such  knowledge  by  patient,  systematic  and 

dispassionate  enquiry  and  cautious  conclusion.  Evidence  o f  this 

is afforded in  his  great work,  Human  Personality  and  its  Survival oj 

bodily Death,  published  in  1903.  Lodge was  greatly  impressed  by 

Myers’  researches  and  became  gradually  convinced  o f the  truth 

o f the  hypothesis  o f survival  o f personality.

After  Myers’  death,  Lodge  firmly  believed  his  friend  com­

municated w ith  him  through  psychical  mediums.  After Lodge’s 

youngest  son,  Raym ond,  had  been  killed  by  shrapnel  near 

Ypres,  in  September  1915,  he learned  through  these channels  that 

Myers  had  continued  the  friendship  by  practically  adopting 

Raym ond.  The  evidence  o f  the  survival  o f  their  spirits  and  o f 

sensory  reactions  in  the  world  beyond  the  grave,  was  described 

by  Lodge  in  his  book  entitled  Raymond:  or  Life  and Death.  With 

Examples  of the  Evidence for  Survival  of Memory  and Affection  after 

Death.  This  w ork  and  that  o f  Myers  on  human  personality  are 

the  two  most  important  contributions  to  the  subject.

In  the  field  o f psychical  research,  Lodge  did  not  expect  to  be 

able  to  construct  ‘models’  o f the  machinery  o f the  kind  familiar 

to  fellow  physicists  o f his  generation.  He  testified  to  the  reality 

o f  certain  super-material  phenomena  but  held  theories  and 

hypotheses  lightly,  open  to  emendation,  but  holding  always

OLIVER  JOSEPH  LODGE 

5 7 1



572

OBITUARY  NOTICES

loyally  to  facts  so  far  as  they had  been ascertained.  He  regarded 

much  o f  modern  thought  in  physics  as  belonging  to  the  same 

category.  ‘The abstract method  o f treatment at present in vogue’, 

he  said,  ‘probably  represents  a  phase  through  which  science  has 

to  go.  It  is  being  conducted  through  the  temporary  haze  with 

great  ability;  but  in  time,  I  believe,  it  will  emerge  on  the  other 

side and become intelligible once more, with an added perception 

o f  reality  and  a  clearer  conception  o f  the  working.  To  that 

conception  the  ether  belongs,  and  we  shall  then  be  better  able  to 

understand  its  nature  and  its  relation  w ith  matter.  The  laws  o f 

dynamics,  however  modified  and  extended,  will  still  be  true; 

the  labour  o f our  scientific  ancestors  will  not  have  been  in  vain. 

By  that  time  it  is  probable  that  the  scheme  o f  physics  will  be 

enlarged  so  as  to  embrace  the  behaviour  o f  living  organisms, 

under  the  influence  o f life  and  m ind.’

Full  references  to  all  Lodge’s  writings  and  scientific  papers 

from  1875  to  1935  are  given in A   Bibliography  of Sir Oliver Lodge, 

by M r Theodore Besterman,  published by the  Oxford  University 

Press  in  the  latter  year.  The  total  number  is  1156.  The  first  was 

read  before  the Physical  Society in  1875,  and  his  last contribution 

to  physics  was  on  the  Larmor-Lorentz  transformation  in  the 



Philosophical  Magazine  in  1933,  in  collaboration  with  his  brother, 

Professor  Alfred  Lodge.  Lodge’s  original  communications  to 

scientific  societies  are  relatively  few  in  the  total  number  o f his 

writings,  which  represented  his  influence  as  a  scientific  educator 

rather  than  a  creator  o f  new  knowledge.  Taking  his  published 

writings  as  a whole,  and  including  papers,  books  and  articles in a 

single group, nearly 600 are on electricity and radio, the ether, and 

other physical subjects.  About  170 deal with philosophy,  religion, 

and  related  subjects,  118  are  biographical,  prefaces  and  reviews, 

145  on psychical research  and spiritual survival, 64  are  educational 

and  academic,  and  71  are  miscellaneous  writings.

Lodge  was  elected  a  Fellow  o f the  Royal  Society  in  1887.  He 

served  on  the  Council  o f  the  Society  in  1893-94,  and  was 

awarded  the  R um ford  Medal  in  1898.  He  received  the  Albert 

Medal o f the Royal Society o f Arts in  1919 as a pioneer o f wireless



telegraphy,  and  the  Faraday Medal  o f the Institution o f Electrical 

Engineers  in  1932.  He  was  President  o f  the  Mathematical  and 

Physical  Section  o f the  British  Association  in  1891,  President  o f 

the  Physical  Society  in  1899-1900,  President  o f the  Society  for 

Psychical  Research,  1901-4  and  1932, and President o f the British 

Association  1913-14.  He  was  created  a  Knight  Bachelor  in  1902, 

and  received  the  honorary  degree  o f D.Sc.  o f the  Universities  o f 

Oxford,  Cambridge,  Manchester,  Liverpool,  Sheffield,  Leeds, 

Adelaide  and  Toronto,  o f  LL.D.  o f  St  Andrews,  Glasgow, 

Aberdeen  and  Edinburgh,  and  M.A.  o f Birmingham.

Lodge  and  Mary  F.  A.  Marshall,  who  became  his  wife,  met 

when  they  were  children.  They  were  born  in  the  same  year  and, 

strangely  enough,  Mary  Marshall’s  mother,  as  well  as  Lodge’s 

father  and  mother,  were  all  born  in  another  same  year.  Mary 

had  remarkable  artistic  gifts  and  became  a  student  at  the  Slade 

School  o f Fine  Art,  University  College,  in  1876.  By  undertaking 

much  additional  w ork  in  examining  and  teaching,  he  was  able 

to  earn  a  sufficient income  to  obtain  her  parents’  consent  to  their 

marriage,  which  took  place  in  the  following  year.  They  had 

twelve  children—six  sons  and  six  daughters—and  celebrated  their 

golden  wedding  in  1927.  Two  years  later,  Lady  Lodge  died  at 

N orm anton  House,  Lake,  near  Salisbury,  which  she  and  Sir 

Oliver himself firmly  believed  was  the home  to  which  they were 

led  by  the  spirit  o f  their  son  Raymond,  to  pass  the  remaining 

years  o f their  lives.  It  was  there  that he  passed  peacefully  into  the 

silence  o f  death  on  22  August  1940—the  anniversary  o f  their 

wedding-day—in  the  sure  and  certain  hope  o f meeting  her  spirit 

again  in  the  ethereal  world  to  the  exploration  o f  which  he 

devoted  the  main  part  o f his  life.

As  scientist,  administrator  and  author,  Lodge  influenced 

profoundly  the  life  o f his  day,  but  it  was  impossible  to  know 

him  without  realizing  that  the  man  was  greater  than  his  work, 

great  though  that  work  has  been.  His  innate  kindliness;  his 

immense  capacity  for  friendship;  his  eager  youthfulness  o f out­

look,  preserved  to  extreme  old  age;  his  freedom  from  all  those 

smallnesses  which  afflict  so  many  o f  the  sons  o f  men;  his



OLIVER  JOSEPH  LODGE 

573


574

OBITUARY  NOTICES

devotion  to  the  pursuit o f knowledge  and  courage  in  maintain­

ing  truth  as  revealed  to  him;  these  are  qualities  which  those 

who  have  know n  and  loved  him  will  not  readily  forget. 

Those  o f us  whose  privilege  it  was  to  be  present  on  that  bright 

afternoon  o f  autumn  when  his  remains  were  committed  to 

earth  felt  that  there  was  nothing  for  tears  in  the  passing  o f  a 

figure  so  venerable  and  so  venerated,  nothing  but  a  deep 

thankfulness  that  Oliver  Lodge  had  been  granted  so  long  and 

so  full  a  life  o f unselfish  service.

W hen  we  undertook  to  prepare  this  notice,  we  wrote  to  Miss 

N orah  Lodge,  who  was  her  father’s  devoted  companion,  and 

she  put us in communication with  Miss  Helen Alvey,  Sir  Oliver’s 

secretary for eighteen years, who was left in charge o f all his books 

and  papers  after  his  death.  Miss  Alvey  has  been  o f the  greatest 

help  in  providing  us  with  copies  o f most  o f these  publications; 

and  we  gratefully  acknowledge  our  indebtedness  to  her  for  this 

material. Professor F.  G.  Baily, who was associated w ith Sir Oliver 

in  the pioneer w ork on wireless telegraphy at University College, 

Liverpool,  was  good  enough  to  send  us  several  very  im portant 

documents  dealing  with  the  early  history  o f the  subject,  particu­

larly  in  presenting  the  patent  and  legal  aspects  o f  practical 

applications  o f scientific  investigation.

Reference  has  already  been  made  to  the  valuable  bibliography 

o f  Sir  Oliver’s  publications,  prepared  by  M r  T.  Besterman, 

who  was  investigation  officer  o f  the  Society  for  Psychical 

Research,  1927-35.  Another  friend  in  this  field  o f  enquiry, 

who  was  for  many  years  a  voluntary  private  secretary  for 

Sir  Oliver,  was  Mr J.  Arthur  Hill,  o f Bradford.  More  than  two 

thousand  letters  passed  between  Sir  Oliver  and  his  friend,  and 

an  annotated  selection  from  them,  by  M r  Hill,  was  published 

in  1932.  This  collection  served  as  an  appendix  to  Sir  Oliver’s 

autobiography,  published  in  the  previous  year  under  the  title 

Past Years.

R .  A. 


G

regory

A

llan

  F

erguson



Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə