Sir walter scott (1771-1832)



Yüklə 0,51 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə6/26
tarix05.04.2022
ölçüsü0,51 Mb.
#85078
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   26
119-2014-03-05-2. Walter Scott

Otherness and Identity. 

 

Of  the  many  paradigms  which  oppose  the  unionist  or  universal  model  of  cultural 



conformity  within  the  British  isles,  the  most  influential  is  the  Caledonian antisyzygy,  which  was 

most eloquently formulated by G Gregory Smith in 1919

7



 



...the literature [of Scotland] is the literature of a small country...it runs a shorter course 

than others...in this shortness and cohesion the most favourable conditions seem to be 

offered  for  a  making  of  a  general  estimate.  But  on  the  other  hand,  we  find  at  closer 

scanning that the cohesion at least in formal expression and in choice of material is only 

apparent, that the literature is remarkably varied, and that it becomes, under the stress of 

foreign  influence,  almost  a  zigzag  of  contradictions.  The  antithesis  need  not,  however, 

disconcert  us.  Perhaps  in  the  very  combination  of  opposites  -  what  either  of  the  two 

                                                

7

  Smith,  Gregory.  Scottish  Literature:  Character  and  Influence.  London:  Macmillan,  1919.  See 



also  Simpson,  Kenneth.  The  Protean  Scot:  Multiple  Voice  in  Eighteenth  Century  Scottish 

Literature. Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 1988 

 



 

Thomases,  of  Norwich  and  Cromarty,  might  have  been  willing  to  call  'the  Caledonian 



antisyzygy' - we have a reflection of the contrasts which the Scot shows at every turn, in 

his  political  and  ecclesiastical  history,  in  his  polemical  restlessness,  in  his  adaptability, 

which  is another way  of  saying  that  he  has  made  allowance  for  new conditions,  in  his 

practical  judgement,  which  is  the  admission  that  two  sides  of  the  matter  have  been 

considered.  If  therefore,  Scottish  history  and  life  are,  as  an  old  northern  writer  said  of 

something else, 'varied with a clean contrair spirit,' we need not be surprised to find that 

in his literature the Scot presents two aspects which appear contradictory. Oxymoron was 

ever  the  bravest  figure,  and  we  must  not  forget  that  disorderly  order  is  order  after  all 

(Smith 5) 

 

Rather  than a  small  country  having  a compact  culture,  Smith  argues  that  diversity  has 



become  the  rule.  Rather  than  be  perplexed  by  this  situation,  Smith  presumably  favours  an 

eclectic,  multi-cultural  community.  Particularly  striking  is  his  reference  to  Thomas  of  Cromarty, 

who translated Rabelais into an idiomatic Anglo-Scottish literary form. There are no grounds for 

pessimism,  seems  to  be  message,  in  fact,  Scots  (both  the  people  and  language)  can  make 

mainstream European culture their reference point without the filter of England and the English. 

 

Equally striking is his belief that the legacy of disputation, inherited from the Reformation, 



can be put to good use, leading not to the forming of two sides but to an understanding of both 

sides. However, I think there are serious objections to be made to Smith's proposal. 

 

Smith's  paradigm  initially  seems  to  answer  the  eternal  questions  about  divisions  and 



splits which are essential features of modern Scottish literature, and which can be traced back to 

Waverley,  whose  very  name,  as  it  has  been  so  often  pointed  out,  illustrates  how  his 

consciousness  wavers  between  opposing  ideologies:  the  Stuart  and  the  Hanoverian.  The  split 

takes its most radical form in Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. So the 

paradigm appears almost as a Scottish literary model (or theory). However, Smith believes is that 

however varied the literary model is, it is 'varied with a clear contrair spirit'; the Scot 'presents two 

aspects  which  appear  contradictory'.  The  keyword  is  'appears',  for  what  Smith  believes  that 

Scottish diversity can be contained and can never be so radical as to explode, or fragment (to use 

his  own  terms,  to  go  beyond  order).  What  is  not  clear  is  whether  the  order  corresponds  to 

Scotland or to Britain. Where does the 'northern writer' belong? Smith's model, I would argue, is 

unionist, and the 'disorderly order' is the United Kingdom. 

 

Smith's ideal model literary text is complex. This can be deduced from this extract, with 



its  emphasis  on  oxymoron,  textual  ambiguities  and  contradictory  tropes,  truly  the  language  of 

New Criticism, where the complex is championed as the ultimate poetic expression, whether the 

poet concerned is John Donne or T.S. Eliot. Therefore, what Smith is arguing is that the basis for 

literary  excellence  (for  his  contemporaries)  has  always  been  present  in  Scottish  literature:  its 

literary  has  always  been  modern.  However,  even  though  this  looks  like  another  claim  of  the 

'wha's like us' species, New Criticism - and by extension Smith's - centre of attention is the text 

and  not  the  context.  In  other  words,  apart  from  rather  loose  identifications  with  a  European 

tradition,  the  nationalist,  or  ideological  weight  of  any  text  is  abandoned.  Thus  Smith,  whilst 

apparently defending a Scottish tradition might actually be doing the opposite: through insisting 

that its modernity results from its abandonment of ideological concerns and its embrace with the 

complexity of verbal icons. 

 

What exactly are the functions of the Tartanry representations, beyond presenting some 



mythological past? 


 

10 


Edward Said has argued that:  

One  ought  never  to  assume  that  the  structure  of  Orientalism  is  nothing  more  than  a 

structure  of  lies  or  of  myths which,  were  the  truth  about  them  to  be  told,  would  simply 

blow  away.  I  myself  believe  Orientalism  is  more  particularly  valuable  as  a  sign  of 

European-Atlantic  power  over  the  Orient  that  is  a  veridic  discourse  about  the  Orient 

(which is what, in its academic or scholarly form, it claims to be.) (Said 6)

8

 

 



If  we  replace  the  structure  of  Orientalism  with  representations  of  Scotland,  we  can 

appreciate what these representations have signified. Thus a national symbol is very much a sign 

of national identity, but it is more likely to demonstrate that the identity only exists on a symbolic 

level, as real power resides elsewhere. 

A  result  of  the  perfection  of  the  symbiosis  between  coloniser  and  colonised  is  well 

illustrated in the following citation from a standard text on post-colonialism: 

 

A model such as Dorsinville's also makes less problematical the situation of Irish, Welsh, 



and  Scottish  literatures  in  relation  to  the  English  'mainstream'.  While  it  is  possible  to 

argue that these societies were the first victims of English expansion, their subsequent 

complicity in the British imperial enterprise makes it difficult for colonised people outside 

Britain to accept their identity as post-colonial (Ashcroft 33)

9

 

 



To what extent this complicity actually existed and at what levels is a highly controversial 

subject.  But  the  appearance  of  complicity  stems  directly  from  Said's  affirmation  that 

representations, in this case of Scotland, are not always perceived as signs of power - not in this 

case European-Atlantic, - but England's power over Scotland itself. 

 

 

 




Yüklə 0,51 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   26




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə