Sir walter scott (1771-1832)



Yüklə 0,51 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə8/26
tarix05.04.2022
ölçüsü0,51 Mb.
#85078
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   26
119-2014-03-05-2. Walter Scott

Explanation 2 

 

The  term  (from  German  literally  a  growing-up  novel)  applies  to  a  narrative  in  which  we 

encounter encounters a description of how the hero/heroine whose personality develops by 

means  of  experience.  The  Bildungsroman  shows  the  consolidation  of  a  set  of  values  by 

which a man/woman lives. This "Bildung" is not so much an educational matter but rather a 

more internal and psychological process. Some examples of this genre would be Fielding’s 



Tom Jones, Dickens's David Copperfield (1849-50) and Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a 

Young Man (1916)  

 

Kenneth M. Sroka 



11

 defends that Edward Waverley undergoes an internal chang. He asserts 

that  education  is  a  central  theme  in  Waverley  and    considers  that  the  evolution  of  the  main 

character  throughout  the  novel  follows  the  directories  of  the  Bildungsroman  genre.  Sroka 

advocates  for  the  balance  between  the  usefulness  and  uselessness  of  studies,  both  practical 

ones and those that are merely for amusement. This balance is extended to the two narrators, the 

fictional  and  the  historical  voices,  and  the  minor  characters,  as  well.  Both  narrators  are 

differentiated  by  their  educational  backgrounds,  the  former  being  predominantly  from  literary 

sources, the latter being from historical roots. 

Sroka points out that Walter Scott depicts his characters through their education, since it is 

influential on their response to real life experiences. Therefore, he develops the topic of education 

as a tangle of useful and useless knowledge, which is distributed between the characters. Major 

and minor characters are defined by the proportion of 'useful' and 'useless' knowledge they have. 

Two  of  the  major  characters,  namely  Flora  MacIvor  and  Rose  Bradwardine  clash  in  their 

education,  since  the  former  possesses  a  more  literary  knowledge  used  in  a  practical  way, 

whereas  the  latter  relies  more  on  experience  than  on  books,  which  she  considers  to  be  a 

complement of her general education. Waverley's interrelation with both characters results in a 

combination of attitudes towards the experiences he undergoes. On the one hand, his romantic 

education  is  turned  into  a  more  "practical  wisdom",  as  Sroka  poses.  On  the  other  hand,  he 

confides  his  literary  knowledge  to  fully  understanding  those  experiences.  For  Kenneth  Sroka, 

Waverley's education in love is consequently "a miniature on his overall education". 

 

Harry  Shaw



12

,  however,  disagrees  in  considering  Waverley  a  character  who  fulfils  the 

properties of a Bildingsroman hero. According to Shaw, one cannot be totally certain whether the 

hero in Waverley is the tool to explore a historical process or the object of an evolution towards 

maturity.  The  historical  process,  rather  than  character  psychology  is  the  main  concern  of  the 

novel.  All  decisions  Waverley  undertakes  arise  out  of  either  external  influences  such  as  his 

acquaintances and his readings or the historical process itself. 

The  approach  to  Waverley's  personality  is  far  too  superficial  to  include  the  novel  in 

'Bildungsroman' genre. Literary education is presented as vital in the first chapters. However, the 

fact that it spends so many pages on narrating Waverley's childhood experiences through reading 

                                                

11

 Sroka, Kenneth. “Education in Walter Scott's Waverley” in Studies in Scottish Literature, vol. 



XIV, Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1980, 139-164 

12

 Shaw, Harry E. 'The Hero as Instrument' in The Form of Historical Fiction, New York: Cornell 



University Press, 1985, 178-189 

 



 

12 


romances  and  enjoying  himself  at  Waverley-Honour, merely reflects  how  the  childhood  idea  of 

living in another timeless world can indeed expand in the adult mind. 

Waverley's evolution is like everybody else's. Gradually he realises that some values (i.e. 

Jacobite  ones)  are  no  longer  his  and  gains  in  self-confidence  and  pragmatism,  just  like  most 

people do. In this sense, it is a normal part of evolution to marry a girl like Rose for pragmatic 

reasons. On the other hand, Waverley learns to take decisions and make moral judgements. The 

only problem is that Waverley does so when he is not really asked to, such as the passage where 

he saves Talbot from the Jacobite troops. 

Scott  seems  to  be  interested  in  building  up  an  account  of  a  historical  process  by 

suggesting  how utterly  it  depends on personal  experience.  At  the same  time,  he  demonstrates 

how difficult it is to disengage one's decisions from one's historical context. 

 


Yüklə 0,51 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   26




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə