Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə54/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   114

[
19] It remains now to examine the views of those who disagree with us.
First, I shall consider the opinion of those who hold that the natural light
of reason does not have the power to interpret Scripture and that for this a
supernatural light is absolutely essential.
14
What this light is which is
beyond nature, I leave to them to explain. I, for my part, can only surmise
that they have been trying to admit, in very obscure terms, that they are
generally in doubt about the true sense of Scripture; for if we examine
their interpretations, we shall ¢nd that they contain nothing supernatural,
indeed nothing more than mere conjectures. Compare them if you will
with the interpretations of those who frankly admit that they have no light
beyond the natural light ^ they will be found to be entirely comparable to
them; that is, they are just human conceptions, the result of hard work and
much thought.
As for their claim that the natural light of reason is not adequate for this
task, it is evident that this is false. We have already proved that none of the
di⁄culties in the interpretation of Scripture arises from the inadequacy of
the natural light, but only from human carelessness (not to mention mal-
ice) in neglecting to construct the history of the Bible when it would have
been possible to do so. It is also due (as everyone, I think, would admit) to
this supernatural light being a divine gift bestowed only on the faithful.
But the prophets and Apostles used to preach not only to the faithful but,
primarily, to unbelievers and impious persons, who were thus enabled to
understand the meaning of the prophets and Apostles. Otherwise the
prophets and Apostles would have
113
appeared to be preaching to little chil-
dren and infants, not to people endowed with reason; it would have been
pointless for Moses to make laws if they could be understood only by the
faithful who need no law. Hence those who postulate the need for a super-
natural light to interpret the minds of the prophets and Apostles truly
seem to be lacking in natural light themselves; so I am very far from
believing that such men have a divine supernatural gift.
[
20] Maimonides’ view, though, was very di¡erent. He thought that
every passage of Scripture yields various, even contradictory, senses and
that we cannot be certain of the truth of any of them unless we know that
14
Presumably, Spinoza is chie£y thinking here of such Dutch Collegiant Bible critics as Petrus
Serrarius (
1600^9), Jan Pietersz. Beelthower (c. 1603^c. 1669), and his close friend Jarig Jelles
(c.
1620^83), all of whom he knew well since his early years in Amsterdam and with whom he had
doubtless often debated.
Theological-Political Treatise
112


that passage which we are interpreting, contains nothing that is contrary
to or that does not accord with reason. If its literal sense is found to
con£ict with reason, no matter how evident that may seem to be in itself,
he insists it should then be construed di¡erently. He makes this abso-
lutely plain in his More Nebuchim
15
Part II, Chapter
25, where he says:
‘Know that we do not refrain from saying that the world has existed from
eternity on account of texts in Scripture about the creation of the world.
For the passages teaching that the world was created are no more
numerous than those which teach that God is corporeal. None of the
ways by which we might explain the texts on the creation of the world are
barred to us or even obstructed; indeed, we could have used the same
method to interpret these as we used to reject the corporality of God. It
might even have been much easier. We might have been able to explain
these texts more naturally and ¢nd more support [in Scripture] for the
eternity of the world than we found for the view that the blessed God is
corporeal, which, on our interpretation, Scripture excludes. But two
reasons persuade me not to do this and not to believe this’ (namely, that
the world is eternal).‘Firstly, because there is clear proof that God is not
corporeal, and it is necessary to explain all the passages whose literal
sense is in con£ict with this proof, for it is certain that they will have an
explanation’ (other than the literal one). ‘But there is no proof of the
eternity of the world; and therefore
114
it is not necessary, in quest of such a
conception, to do violence to Scripture for the sake of an apparent opi-
nion since we would accept its contrary if we found a convincing argu-
ment for it. The second reason is that to believe that God is incorporeal
is not in con£ict with the fundamentals of the Law, etc. But to believe in
the eternity of the world in the manner in which Aristotle held destroys
the Law from its foundations, etc.’
These are the words of Maimonides, from which what we have just said
plainly follows. For if it was clear to him on the basis of reason that the
world was eternal, he would not hesitate to bend Scripture to devise an
interpretation that would ultimately render it saying apparently the same
thing. In fact, he would be immediately convinced that Scripture intended
to teach the eternity of the world, despite the fact that it everywhere says
the opposite. Hence, it is impossible for him to be certain of the Bible’s
true meaning, however plain it may be, as long as he can doubt the truth of
15
Maimonides, Guide of the Perplexed ii.
25.
On the interpretation of Scripture
113


what is stated there, or as long as its truth is not fully evident to him. For
while the truth of a thing is not evident we will not know whether it
agrees with reason or contradicts it and, consequently, will also not know
whether the literal sense is true or false. Were this approach indeed the
correct one, I absolutely agree that we would then need something
beyond the natural light for interpreting Scripture. For there is almost
nothing in the Bible that can be deduced from principles known by the
natural light of reason (as we have already shown), and therefore we
simply cannot be certain about their truth by means of the natural light.
Hence, we could not be certain about the true meaning and sense of
Scripture either, and we would necessarily need another light.
Again, were this conception [of Maimonides] correct, it would follow
that the common people, who for the most part do not understand proofs
or do not have time to examine them, will only be able to reach any con-
clusion at all about Scripture on the sole authority and testimony of phi-
losophers, and consequently would have to suppose that philosophers
cannot err in interpreting Scripture. This would surely produce a new
ecclesiastical authority and a novel species of priest or ponti¡, which
would more likely be mocked than venerated by the common people.
While our method requires a knowledge of Hebrew and the common
people likewise have no time to study that, no such objection weakens
our position. For the Jewish and gentile common people for whom in
their day the prophets and
115
Apostles preached and wrote, understood
their language so that they also grasped the prophets’ meaning. Yet they
did not understand the reasons for what the prophets preached, though,
according to Maimonides, they needed to know them if they were going
to grasp their meaning. Under our methodological scheme, hence, it
need not follow that the common people must accept the testimony of
interpreters. I can point to the common people who understood very
well the language of the prophets and Apostles, but Maimonides will not
be able to point to any common people who understand the causes of
things and grasp their meaning on that basis. As far as the common
people of today, are concerned, we have already shown that they can
readily grasp in any language everything necessary for salvation as this is
all entirely normal and familiar, even if they are ignorant about the rea-
sons for what is required; and the common people rely on this under-
standing, and certainly not on the testimony of interpreters. As for
everything else, there they are in the same position as the learned.
Theological-Political Treatise
114




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə