International refereed journal of design and architecture print issn



Yüklə 32 Kb.

səhifə65/147
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü32 Kb.
1   ...   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   ...   147

MTD
www.mtddergisi.com
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ TASARIM VE MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
Ocak  /  Şubat / Mart  / Nisan  2017 Sayı: 10 Kış - İlkbahar 
INTERNATIONALREFEREEDJOURNAL OF DESIGNANDARCHITECTURE
January / February / March / April 2017 Issue: 10 Winter – Spring
ID:119 K:197
ISSN Print: 2148-8142 Online: 2148-4880
 (ISO 18001-OH-0090-13001706 / ISO 14001-EM-0090-13001706 / ISO 9001-QM-0090-13001706 / ISO 10002-CM-0090-13001706)
(Marka Patent No / Trademark)
(2015/04018 – 2015/GE/17595)
138
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ
TASARIM MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
INTERNATIONAL REFEREED
JOURNAL OF DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
PRINT ISSN: 2148-8142 - ONLINE ISSN: 2148-4880
putting new concepts in the place of the old 
ones (Koçyiğit, 2012: 98-113). This might be 
interpreted  as  liberation  and  in  this  respect 
Capitalism can be considered to be the most 
opened and the most closed period to deterri-
torialization. Because Capitalism seems to be 
promoting the increase of the new, but this is 
always a “new” rising on the base of exchan-
ge principle (Colebrook, 2009: 82-99).
Another interpretation about deterritorializa-
tion is that it is the loss of the natural ties bet-
ween the every-day life culture and the geog-
raphical & social ground (Tomlinson, 2004: 
147-204). In other words,
 
deterritorialization 
is not the end of local, but the transformation 
of the local into a complicated cultural space. 
Depending on all of these ideas, the concept 
of “deterritorialization” might be explained as 
not belonging to anywhere, but everywhere.
Digital Age
Another notion related with non-place is the 
digital age which has been shown as the cau-
se disappearance of the borders, making any 
place  or  any  event  accessible.  But  beyond 
these  characteristics,  it  brought  new  expan-
sions  of  space.  Kaçmaz  (2004:  8)  specifies 
these digitally supported spaces as cyberspa-
ce, hyperspace and exospace and signifies all 
of them as “the other of architecture”. They 
all have spatial qualities but cannot be con-
sidered to be architectural spaces as nobody 
really lives in them. Cyberspace is the intan-
gible world of digital information that can be 
accessed through the Internet. Hyperspace is 
created where the user observes reactions to 
his movements in real-time as a result of his 
physical connection to the computer by some 
tools. Exospace is a digitally supported ext-
raterrestrial space. Kaçmaz (2004: 42) argues 
that industrial revolution has given architects 
the concept of space whereas digital revolu-
tion  its  opposite.  These  non-architecturally 
spatial entities cause decentralization and so 
that the power is non-localized. Hence this si-
tuation brings mobility.
Coyne (2007: 26-38) compares virtual reality 
and non-places and emphasises some simila-
rities between them. He argues that whereas 
rich, meaningful or just everyday places are 
cognitively  enabling  and  facilitate  thinking; 
non-places and spaces of virtual reality do not 
evoke the individual to think. In both of them 
the person is instructed by some commands, 
therefore  they  become  cognitively  deficient 
spaces. There is no need for personal thought 
in them. Even though virtual reality has the 
potential of being cognitively very rich, it ge-
nerally serves like a container of cognition. 
Cognition does not attend to its material fab-
ric. Virtual reality is generally criticized by 
missing out on the subtleties of spatiality that 
enable thought to take place. Non-place and 
virtual  reality  resemble  in  this  aspect,  they 


MTD
www.mtddergisi.com
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ TASARIM VE MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
Ocak  /  Şubat / Mart  / Nisan  2017 Sayı: 10 Kış - İlkbahar 
INTERNATIONALREFEREEDJOURNAL OF DESIGNANDARCHITECTURE
January / February / March / April 2017 Issue: 10 Winter – Spring
ID:119 K:197
ISSN Print: 2148-8142 Online: 2148-4880
 (ISO 18001-OH-0090-13001706 / ISO 14001-EM-0090-13001706 / ISO 9001-QM-0090-13001706 / ISO 10002-CM-0090-13001706)
(Marka Patent No / Trademark)
(2015/04018 – 2015/GE/17595)
139
ULUSLARARASI HAKEMLİ
TASARIM MİMARLIK DERGİSİ
INTERNATIONAL REFEREED
JOURNAL OF DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
PRINT ISSN: 2148-8142 - ONLINE ISSN: 2148-4880
both cannot use the potentials of becoming a 
place. Another resemblance is the feeling of 
detachment, social dislocation and placeless-
ness they nourish. 
THE CONTROL MECHANISMS in 
NON-PLACE
Throughout  Modernity  the  power  mecha-
nisms tried to find an effective way of kee-
ping the masses under pressure. The aim of 
this  discipline  mechanism  is  to  achieve  the 
normalization of the members of the commu-
nity. After the Industrial Revolution, in order 
to keep the system going, the ruling classes 
tried to keep other classes that are inclined to 
revolt under control by social discipline and 
alignment. In this system the object lost his 
individual importance and became a harmo-
nious member which is necessary for the sur-
vival of the system. According to Foucault, 
the power is everywhere and nowhere in mo-
dern  liberal  communities  (Touraine,  2010: 
210-220). There are micro-centers which are 
the reflections of power and when they come 
together they form the system. These discipli-
nary societies are depending on watching and 
punishment. The ideal form of this concep-
tual basis is Bentham’s panopticon according 
to  Foucault  (Gutting,  2010:  117-137).  This 
form,  which  is  simply  a  watching  tower  in 
the center surrounded by cells housing indivi-
duals, was first used for prison design. Later 
this principal became popular in many cont-
rol spaces such as military schools, hospitals, 
mental institutions, university campuses, and 
so on briefly in every space where the control 
over a group is in question. The main issue 
about  the  panopticon  is  not  literally  being 
watched, but the potential of being watched 
and punished.
Non-places  can  be  assumed  as  panopticons 
as being spaces of control. The entrance to a 
non-place is under a contract. The user needs 
to have a ticket to enter an airport or high-
way, there has to be a reservation to stay in 
a hotel or holiday village, s/he has to be de-
tected first in order to enter a shopping-mall. 
The control mechanism keeps on going also 
inside the non-place by digital technologies. 
There are many cameras watching whatever 
is  done.  Nobody  might  know  if  s/he  is  si-
multaneously being watched from a control 
room, but the potential of being watched ke-
eps her/him away from doing anything oppo-
sing to the contract. S/he can exactly be sure 
that s/he will be punished in case of breaking 
the speed-limit in a high-way, stealing or do-
ing anything inconvenient in a shopping mall 
or carrying any forbidden stuff at an airport. 
What is expected from an individual in a non-
place is to obey according to her/his “role”, 
just as being a regretful prisoner, obedient pa-
tient, good student, loyal soldier in a panop-
ticon. S/he would be dismissed or punished 
if s/he dares to go beyond these expectations. 



Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   ...   147


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə