Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə102/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   ...   114

chapter 20
239
Where it is shown that in a free state everyone is
allowed to think what they wish and to say
what they think
1
[
1] Were it as easy to control people’s minds as to restrain their tongues,
every sovereign would rule securely and there would be no oppressive
governments. For all men would live according to the minds of those who
govern them and would judge what is true or false, or good or bad, in
accordance with their decree alone. But as we noted at the beginning of
chapter
17
, it is impossible for one person’s mind to be absolutely under
another’s control. For no one can transfer to another person his natural
right, or ability, to think freely and make his own judgments about any matter
whatsoever, and cannot be compelled to do so. This is why a government
which seeks to control people’s minds is considered oppressive, and any
sovereign power appears to harm its subjects and usurp their rights when it
tries to tell them what they must accept as true and reject as false and what
beliefs should inspire their devotion to God. For these things are within each
person’s own right, which he cannot give up even were he to wish to do so.
[
2] A person’s judgment, admittedly, may be subjected to another’s in
many di¡erent and sometimes almost unbelievable ways to such an extent
that, even though he may not be directly under the other person’s com-
mand, he may be so dependent on him that he may properly be said to be
under his authority to that extent. Yet however much skilful methods may
accomplish in this respect, these have never succeeded in altogether
1
Tacitus, Histories,
1.1.
250


suppressing men’s awareness that they have a good deal of sense of their
own and that their minds di¡er no less than do their palates. Moses very
much subjected his people’s judgment to himself, not by trickery but
rather by his divine virtue, as he was believed to be a man of God and to
speak and do all things by divine inspiration. But even he could not prevent
malicious rumours and innuendoes. Much less can other rulers. In so far as
such subjugation of judgment were to be considered possible, it would be
most likely under a monarchical government and least probable under a
democratic one where all the people, or a large part of them, hold power col-
lectively.The reason for this di¡erence, I think, will be evident to everybody.
[
3] However much therefore sovereign
240
authorities are believed to have a
right to all things and to be the interpreters of right and piety, they will never
be able to ensure that people will not use their own minds to judge about any
matter whatever and that, to that extent, they will not be a¡ected by one
passion or another. It is indeed true that they can by natural right regard as
enemies everyone who does not think absolutely as they do in all things, but
we have moved on from arguing about right, and are now discussing what is
bene¢cial. So while conceding that they may by natural right employ a high
degree of violence in governing, and arrest citizens or liquidate them for
the most trivial reasons, nevertheless everyone will agree that this is not
consistent with the criteria of sound reason. Indeed, rulers cannot do such
things without great risk to their whole government, and hence we can also
deny that they have absolute power to do these and similar things and con-
sequently that they possess any complete right to do them. For as we have
proved, the right of sovereign authorities is limited by their power.
[
4] No one, therefore, can surrender their freedom to judge and to think
as they wish and everyone, by the supreme right of nature, remains master
of their own thoughts. It follows that a state can never succeed very far in
attempting to force people to speak as the sovereign power commands,
since people’s opinions are so various and so contradictory. For not even the
most consummate statesmen, let alone the common people, possess the
gift of silence. It is a universal failing in people that they communicate
their thoughts to others, however much they should [sometimes] keep
quiet. Hence, a government which denies each person freedom to speak and
to communicate what they think, will be a very violent government whereas
a state where everyone is conceded this freedom will be moderate.
A free state
251


[
5] However, we cannot altogether deny that treason may be committed
as much by words as by deeds. Consequently, if it is impossible altogether
to deny subjects this freedom, it is, on the other hand, likewise very dan-
gerous to concede it without any restriction. For this reason we must now
ask how far this freedom can and ought to be granted to each person, so as
to be consistent with the stability of the state and protecting the sovereign’s
authority. This, as I explained at the beginning of chapter
16
, has been my
principal goal.
[
6] It very clearly follows from the fundamental principles of the state
which I explained above that its ultimate purpose is not to dominate or
control people by fear or subject them to the authority of another. On the
contrary, its aim is to free everyone from fear so that they may live in
security so far as possible, that is,
241
so that they may retain, to the highest
possible degree, their natural right to live and to act without harm to
themselves or to others. It is not, I contend, the purpose of the state to turn
people from rational beings into beasts or automata, but rather to allow
their minds and bodies to develop in their own ways in security and enjoy
the free use of reason, and not to participate in con£icts based on hatred,
anger or deceit or in malicious disputes with each other. Therefore, the
true purpose of the state is in fact freedom.
[
7] Furthermore, when constituting a state one thing which we noted
was indispensable was that the entire power of decision-making should be
lodged in all the people, or else in some, or else just one. But people’s free
judgments are very diverse and everyone thinks they know everything
themselves, and it can never happen that everyone will think exactly alike
and speak with one voice. It would have been impossible therefore for
people to live in peace, unless each one gave up his right to act according to
his own decision alone. Each one therefore surrendered his right to act
according to his own resolution, but not his right to think and judge for
himself. Thus no one can act against the sovereign’s decisions without
prejudicing his authority, but they can think and judge and consequently
also speak without any restriction, provided they merely speak or teach by
way of reason alone, not by trickery or in anger or from hatred or with the
intention of introducing some alteration in the state on their own initia-
tive. For example, suppose someone shows a law to be contrary to sound
reason and voices the opinion that it should be repealed. If at the same
Theological-Political Treatise
252




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə