Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə98/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   ...   114

chapter 19
Where it is shown that authority in sacred matters
belongs wholly to the sovereign powers and that
the external cult of religion must be consistent
with the stability of the state if we wish to obey
God rightly
[
1] When I said above that only those who hold sovereign power
have jurisdiction over everything, and that all authority depends on their
decree alone, I had in mind not just civil jurisdiction but also that over
sacred matters. For they must be both the interpreters and guardians of
things sacred. I want to put a particular emphasis on this point con-
centrating on it in this chapter, because very many people vigorously
deny that this right (i.e. jurisdiction over sacred matters) belongs to the
sovereign authorities, and refuse to recognize them as interpreters of
divine law. From this they also arrogate to themselves licence to accuse
and condemn sovereigns and even to excommunicate them from the
church (as Ambrose long ago excommunicated the emperor Theodosius).
We shall see below in this present chapter that what they are in e¡ect
doing is dividing the sovereign power and attempting to devise a path to
power for themselves.
[
2] I intend ¢rst to show that religion has the power of law only by decree
of those who exercise the right of government and that God has no special
kingdom among men except through those who exercise sovereignty. I also
wish to demonstrate that religious worship and pious conduct must be
accommodated to the peace
229
and interests of the state and consequently
must be determined by the sovereign authorities alone.
238


[
3 ] I sp e ak expre s sly of p ious c onduct and for mal relig ious worship and
not p i e ty its elf or pr ivate worship of Go d or the me ans by which the
mind is in te r nally directe d wholehe ar te dly to reve re Go d. For inte r nal
ve n e rat ion of Go d, and p i e ty, a s such are u nde r eve r yon e’s individual
ju r is diction (a s we showe d at the e nd of ch. 
7
), and c annot b e transfe r red
to anothe r. Fu r the r m ore , what I me an by ‘kingdom of Go d’ he re is plain
e nough, I supp o s e , fro m chapte r 
14
. We showe d the re that a p e rs on ful ¢ls
the law of Go d by pract is ing just ice and char ity at Go d’s c o mma nd, fro m
which it follows that a kingdom of Go d is a kingdom in which just ice and
char ity have the force of law and c o mma nd. I c annot s e e that it make s
any di¡e re nce he re whe the r Go d te ache s and c o m mands the tr ue prac -
t ice of just ice and char ity by the natural ligh t of re a s on or by revelat ion.
It make s no di¡e rence how such pract ice is reve aled

to me n, provide d
that it p o s s e s s e s supre me author ity and s e r ve s me n a s the ir highe st law.
Just ice and char ity I must the refore now show c an only rece ive the
force of law and c o mma nd via the author ity of the st ate , and the n I will
e a s ily b e able to c onclude (s ince the r igh t of gove r n me n t b elong s only to
the s ove re ig n author it i e s) that religion ha s the force of law exclus ively by
de cre e of tho s e who p o s s e s s the r igh t to exe rc is e gove r n me n t. It follows
that Go d ha s no sp e c ial king ship ove r me n except through tho s e who
exe rc is e gove r n me n t.
[
4 ] That the pract ice of just ice and char ity ha s the force of law only via
the author ity of the st ate is cle ar fro m what wa s s aid ab ove. We have
prove d in chapte r 
16 
that , in the natu ral st ate , re a s on ha s no m ore r igh t
than ha s app e t ite ; b oth tho s e who live by the laws of app e t ite and tho s e
who live by the laws of reason there possess the right to do everything
they can. This is why, in the state of nature, men were not able to con-
ceive of wrong nor of God as a judge punishing men for wrongdoing, but
rather recognized that all things happen according to the common laws
of universal nature and that the same chance (to use Solomon’s words)
2
a¡ects the just and the unjust, the pure and the impure, and so on, and
there is no room for justice or charity. And if the teachings of true rea-
s on, which are the divin e te achings the ms elve s (a s we showe d in ch. 
4
 on
1
Spinoza means here that it makes no di¡erence whether men base their conduct on justice and
charity because they think religion teaches this, or whether they grasp that this is the highest mor-
ality through use of their reason.
2
Ecclesiastes
9.2.
Sovereign powers and religion
239


the divine law), are to have the full force of law, it is necessary that each
person should give up his own
230
natural right and that all should transfer
their right to all men, or else some men, or else one man; and it was then
and only then that we ¢rst learned what justice and injustice, equity and
inequity are.
[
5] Justice therefore and all the doctrines of true reason without
exception, including charity towards our neighbour, receive the force of law
and command from the authority of the state alone, that is (as we showed
in the same chapter) solely from the decree of those who have the right to
rule. Now because, as I have already shown, the kingdom of God consists
solely in the law of justice, charity and true religion, it follows that God has
no kingdom over men except through those who hold power. This is what
we have been seeking to demonstrate. It makes no di¡erence, I say, whether
we conceive of religion as revealed by the natural light of reason or by the
light of prophecy. The demonstration is universal, since religion is the
same and equally revealed by God, whichever way men are supposed to
have learned it.
[
6] Therefore, in order that even prophetically revealed religion should
have the force of law among the Hebrews, each of them had ¢rst to give
up his natural right, and all had to decide by common consent to obey
solely what was prophetically revealed to them by God. This is exactly
the same thing as we have shown occurs in a democratic state, where all
decide by common consent to live by the dictate of reason alone.
Although the Hebrews also transferred their right to God, they could
only do this in intention rather than reality, for in fact (as we saw above)
they retained the absolute right of government until they transferred this
to Moses. Thereafter, Moses remained absolute ruler, and it was through
him alone that God ruled over the Hebrews. For the same reason also,
namely because religion receives the force of law by the authority of the
state alone, Moses could not punish those who violated the sabbath
before the covenant since they then, in consequence, still possessed their
own right (see Exodus
16.27). After the covenant, on the other hand (see
Numbers
15.36), i.e., after each one gave up their natural right, the
sabbath received the force of command by virtue of the right of the state.
On the same grounds, revealed religion no longer possessed the force of
law after the destruction of the Hebrew state. For there can be no doubt
Theological-Political Treatise
240




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə