Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə96/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   ...   114

men of Israel were slaughtered by those of Judah. In another, the Israelites
killed many of the men of Judah, captured their king, virtually demolished the
walls of Jerusalem and (to let everyone know that there was no limit to their
fury) totally devastated the Temple itself. Then, laden with great quantities of
spoil taken from their brothers and sated with their blood, they took hostages
and left the king his almost utterly ruined kingdom. Finally, they laid down
their arms, having built their security not on the edi¢ce of good faith but the
drastic weakening of the men of Judah. Some years later, when Judah’s strength
had revived, they engaged again in battle, and again the Israelites emerged
victorious, annihilating
120,000 men of Judah, taking as many as 200,000
women and children captive, and once again seizing immense booty. But when
their resources were consumed in these and other con£icts mentioned in
passing in the histories, they themselves ¢nally likewise fell prey to their
enemies.
[
5] If we try to calculate the periods in which the Israelites were allowed
to enjoy complete peace, we shall ¢nd a signi¢cantly vast di¡erence
[between the periods without and with kings]. In the time before the
kings, they often passed forty and even, on one occasion (you may hardly
believe this), eighty years, in concord, without foreign or internal wars. But
as soon as the kings took control, the reason for going to war was no longer,
as before, peace and liberty but rather glory, and we read that all the kings
fought wars except only Solomon whose virtue, i.e. wisdom, £ourished
better in peace than in war. Deadly lust for power took over, rendering the
path to the throne very bloody for many of them. Finally, the laws remained
uncorrupted as long as the rule of the people continued, and were more
faithfully observed: for prior to rule by kings, there were very few prophets
to counsel the people. But once monarchy was opted for, there was always a
large number of prophets: Obadiah saved a hundred of them from death
by hiding them so that they would not be liquidated with the rest of the
prophets. Nor do we ¢nd the people being deceived by any false prophets
until after power passed to kings many of whom they strove to £atter.
Besides, the people whose resolve is generally high or low according to
their situation, readily disciplined themselves in disasters, prior to kings,
and turned to God and restored the laws, and in this manner extricated
themselves from every danger. By contrast, afterwards, their kings, since
monarchical minds are always proud, and cannot back down without feel-
ings of humiliation clung obstinately to their faults, until the ¢nal
destruction of the city.
The Hebrew state and its history
233


[
6] We see very clearly from this:
(
1) How pernicious it is both for religion and the state to allow ministers
of things sacred to acquire the right to make decrees or handle the business
of government. Rather everything proceeds with much more stability, we see,
if they are so tightly restricted that they may not give responses on any subject
on which questions have not been put to them, and in the meantime are
allowed to teach and practise only what is generally received and usual.
(
2) How dangerous it is to refer purely philosophical questions to divine
law, and to make laws about opinions which men can or do dispute. Govern-
ment is bound to become extremely oppressive where [dissident] opinions
which are within the domain of each individual, a right which no one can
give up, are treated as a crime. Where this happens, the anger of the common
people tends to prevail. Pilate knew that Christ was innocent but ordered him
to be cruci¢ed so as to appease the fury of the Pharisees. In order to strip
those who were richer than themselves of their o⁄ces, the Pharisees aimed
to stir up controversies about religion and accuse the Sadducees of impiety.
Following the example of the Pharisees, all the worst hypocrites everywhere
have been driven by the same frenzy (which they call zeal for God’s law), to
persecute men of outstanding probity and known virtue, resented by the com-
mon people for precisely these qualities, by publicly reviling their opinions,
and in£aming the anger of the barbarous majority against them. This aggres-
sive licence cannot easily be checked because it hides itself under the cloak of
religion, especially when the sovereign authorities have introduced a cult of
which they themselves are not the heads. Where that occurs, the authorities
are not regarded as the interpreters of divine law but as members of the
church, that is, as people who accept the doctors of the sect as the interpreters
of divine law. In this situation, the authority
226
of the magistrates usually has
very little in£uence with the common people; rather the authority of the
theologians (to whose interpretations they think that even kings must sub -
mit), acquires overwhelming weight. In order to avoid these di⁄culties, the
safest policy is to regard piety and the practice of religion as a question of
works alone, that is, as simply the practice of charity and justice, and to leave
everyone to his own free judgment about everything else; but we will speak
about this more fully presently.
4
(
3) We see how necessary it is both for the state, and for religion, to assign
the authority to decide what is religiously right or not to the sovereign power
alone. For if authority to make this distinction in practice cannot without great
harm to both state and religion be left to God’s prophets themselves, much
4
See pp.
238¡. and 250¡.
Theological-Political Treatise
234




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə