Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə18/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   114

servitude, as well as our assumptions about the authority of sovereigns. For
there are many men who take the outrageous liberty of trying to appro-
priate the greater part of this authority and utilize religion to win the alle-
giance of the common people, who are still in thrall to pagan superstition
with the aim of bringing us all back into servitude again. I plan to give a
brief outline of the order in which I shall demonstrate these things, but
¢rst I want to explain why I was impelled to write.
[
9] I have often been amazed to ¢nd that
8
people who are proud to profess
the Christian religion, that is [a religion of ] love, joy, peace, moderation
and good will to all men, opposing each other with extraordinary animos-
ity and giving daily expression to the bitterest mutual hatred. So much so
that it has become easier to recognize an individual’s faith by the latter
features than the former. It has been the case for a long time that one can
hardly know whether anyone is a Christian, Turk, Jew or gentile, other
than that he has a certain appearance and dresses in a certain way or
attends one or another church and upholds a certain belief or pays alle-
giance to one magistrate rather than another. Otherwise their lives are
identical in each case.
In searching out the reason for this deplorable situation, I never doub-
ted that it arose because, in the religion of the common people, serving the
church has been regarded as a worldly career, what should be its unpre-
tentious o⁄ces being seen as lucrative positions and its pastors considered
great dignitaries. As soon as this abuse began in the church, the worst kind
of people came forward to ¢ll the sacred o⁄ces and the impulse to spread
God’s religion degenerated into sordid greed and ambition. Churches
became theatres where people went to hear ecclesiastical orators rather
than to learn from teachers. Pastors no longer sought to teach, but strove to
win a reputation for themselves while denigrating those who disagreed
with them, by teaching new and controversial doctrines designed to
seize the attention of the common people. This was bound to generate a
great deal of con£ict, rivalry and resentment, which no passage of time
could heal.
Unsurprisingly, then, nothing remains of the religion of the early
church except its external ritual (by which the common people seem to
adulate rather than venerate God), and faith amounts to nothing more
than credulity and prejudices. And what prejudices they are! They turn
rational men into brutes since they completely prevent each person from
Preface
7


using his own free judgment and distinguishing truth from falsehood.
They seem purposely designed altogether to extinguish the light of the
intellect. Dear God! Piety and religion are reduced to ridiculous mysteries
and those who totally condemn reason and reject and revile the under-
standing as corrupt by nature, are believed without question to possess
the divine light, which is the most iniquitous aspect of all. Clearly, if these
men had even a spark of divine light, they would not rave so arrogantly.
They would learn to revere God with more good sense, and surpass other
men in love as they now surpass them in hatred. Nor would they persecute
so ¢ercely those who disagree with them, but would have compassion for
them (if they really do fear for those people’s salvation more than for their
own advancement).
Furthermore, if they had any
9
godly insight, that at least would emerge
clearly from their teaching. But while I admit that they could not express
greater veneration for the deepest mysteries of Scripture, what I see
in their actual teaching is nothing more than the speculations of the
Aristotelians or Platonists. Since they did not wish to appear to be follow-
ing pagans, they adapted the scriptures to them. It was insu⁄cient for
them to be mouthing nonsense themselves, they also desired, together
with the Greeks, to render the prophets equally nonsensical. This proves
clearly that they cannot even imagine what is really divine in Scripture.The
more vehemently such men express admiration for its mysteries, the more
they show they do not really believe Scripture but merely assent to it. This
is also clear from the fact that most of them take it as a fundamental
principle (for the purpose of understanding Scripture and bringing out its
true meaning) that Scripture is true and divine throughout. But of course
this is the very thing that should emerge from a critical examination and
understanding of Scripture. It would be much better to derive it from
Scripture itself, which has no need of human fabrications, but they assume
it at the very beginning as a rule of interpretation.
[
10] As I re£ected on all this ^ that the natural light of reason is not only
despised but condemned by many as a source of impiety, that human
fabrications are taken as divine teaching, that credulity is deemed to be
faith, and that doctrinal con£icts are fought out in Church and Court with
intense passion and generate the most bitter antipathies and struggles,
which quickly bring men to sedition, as well as a whole host of other things
that it would take too long to explain here ^ I resolved in all seriousness to
Theological-Political Treatise
8


make a fresh examinati on of Scr iptu re with a fre e and u nprejudice d mind,
and to a s s e r t nothing ab out it , and to acce pt nothing a s its te aching, which
I did not quite cle arly der ive fro m it. With this provis o in mind, I devis e d a
me tho d for in te r pre t ing the s acre d volu me s.
In acc ordance with this me tho d, I b e gan by inquir ing ¢rst of all: W hat is
prophe cy ? In what mann e r did Go d reve al hi ms elf to the prophe ts ?
10 
Why
we re they acce pt able to Go d ? Wa s it b e c aus e they had elevate d c once ptions
of Go d and natu re, or wa s it s i mply due to the ir p i e ty ? Once I kn ew this ,
I wa s e a s ily able to c onclude that the author ity of the prophe ts c ar r i e s
we igh t only in m oral que st ions and with re gard to tr ue virtue , and that for
the re st the ir op inions matte r ve r y little to us.
11
Once I had u nde rsto o d this , I s ough t to know why it wa s that the
Heb rews we re c alle d the cho s e n of Go d. W he n I s aw that this wa s s i mply
b e c aus e Go d had cho s e n a ce r t ain par t of the e ar th for the m whe re they
c ould dwell in s afe ty and pro sp e r ity, I 
10
reali z e d that the Laws reve ale d by
Go d to Mo s e s we re nothing but the decre e s of the histor ic al Heb rew st ate
alon e , and acc ordingly that no on e n e e de d to adopt the m but the Heb rews ,
and eve n they we re only b ou nd by the m s o long a s the ir st ate su r vive d.
12
Next I s e t mys elf to dis c ove r whe the r we should re ally c onclude fro m
Scr iptu re that hu man u nderst anding is c or r upt by nature. To ¢nd this out ,
I b e gan to c ons ide r ¢rst whe the r u nive rs al relig ion, or the divin e law
reve ale d to the whole human race through the prophe ts and Ap o stle s , wa s
re ally anything othe r than the law which the natu ral ligh t of re a s on als o
te aches.
13 
Se c ondly, I inquire d whe the r miracle s have o ccu r red c on trar y to
the order of natu re and whe the r they show the existe nce and provide nce of
Go d m ore su rely and cle arly than thing s which we u nde rst and cle arly and
dist inctly through the ir ow n ¢rst c aus e s.
14
I found nothing in what Scripture expressly teaches that does not con-
cur with our understanding and nothing that is in con£ict with it. I also
perceived that the prophets taught only very simple things which could be
easily understood by everyone, and had elaborated them with the kind of
style, and supported them with the sort of reasons that might most e¡ec-
tively sway the people’s mind towards God. In this way, I became com-
pletely convinced that Scripture leaves reason absolutely free and has
nothing at all in common with philosophy, but that each of them stands on
its own separate footing. In order to demonstrate these things conclusively
10
Ch. 
1
 .
11
Ch. 
2
 .
12
Ch. 
3
 .
13
Ch. 
4
 .
14
Ch. 
6
.
Preface
9




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə