Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə26/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   114

Hananiah who prophesied, contrary to all the other prophets, a swift
restoration of the city, necessarily required a sign; otherwise he would have
to be in doubt about his own prophecy, until the outcome of his prediction
con¢rmed it: see Jeremiah
28.9.
[
6] As therefore the certainty the prophets derived from signs was not
mathematical certainty (that is, a certainty which follows from the neces-
sity of the perception of the thing that is perceived or seen) but only moral
certainty, and the signs were given for nothing other than to convince the
prophet, it follows that the signs were given according to the prophet’s
beliefs and understanding. Hence a sign that reassured one prophet as to
his prophecy might not convince another imbued with di¡erent beliefs;
and hence these signs varied from prophet to prophet.
[
7] The revelation itself also varied from one prophet to another, as we
have already said: it depended upon the disposition of his bodily tem-
perament, his imagination and the beliefs he had previously adopted. As
regards temperament, it di¡ered in this way: if the prophet was cheerful,
his revelations were of victories and peace and other things that conduce to
happiness, for such men are apt to imagine such things quite often; if on
the other hand he was gloomy, his revelations concerned wars, torments
and everything bad. The prophet would be more inclined towards one or
the other kind of revelation depending on whether he was merciful and
kindly or wrathful and harsh, and so on. Revelation also varied according
to the cast of his imagination: if the prophet was a discerning man, he
perceived God’s mind with clarity, but if he was muddled, he did so in a
confused manner. So too with revelations made through visions: if the
prophet was a country fellow, it was oxen and cows and so on that were
what was represented to him; if he was a soldier, generals and armies; and if
he was a courtier, a royal throne and such like. Finally, the prophecy varied
according to the di¡erent beliefs of the prophets: for example, the nativity
of Christ was revealed to the Magi (see Matthew
2), who believed in the
nonsense of astrology, through their
33
imagining a star risen in the east; the
destruction of Jerusalem was revealed to the augurs of Nebuchadnezzar
in entrails (see Ezekiel
21.26), and the king also divined it through oracles
and from the direction of the arrows which he shot into the air. Then
again, those prophets who supposed that men act of their own free choice
and power, received revelations representing God as indi¡erent to and
Theological-Political Treatise
30


ignorant of future human actions. We will now demonstrate each of
these points one by one from Scripture itself.
[
8] The ¢rst point is evident from the case of Elisha (see 2 Kings 3.15),
who, in order to prophesy to Jehoram, requested a musical instrument.
Nor could he perceive God’s mind other than when charmed by its
music. Only then did he predict joyful things to Jehoram and those
around him. This he could not do before, because he was angry with the
king, and those who are angry with someone are inclined to imagine bad
and not good things about them. As for those who insist that God is not
revealed to those who are angry and gloomy, they are wide of the mark.
God revealed to Moses, who was angry with Pharaoh at the time, the
terrible massacre of the ¢rst-born (see Exodus
11.8), and without using
any musical instrument. God was also revealed to Cain when he was fur-
iously angry.The future misery and disobedience of the Jews was revealed
to Ezekiel when he was seething with fury (see Ezekiel
3.14). Jeremiah
prophesied the calamities of the Jews when he was thoroughly morbid
and experiencing great disgust for life, so much so that Josiah was
unwilling to consult him, and consulted a female colleague of Jeremiah’s,
supposing that with her woman’s mind she would be more likely to
receive a revelation of God’s mercy (see
2 Chronicles 34).
4
Micaiah also
never prophesied anything good to Ahab, though other true prophets
did (as is clear from
1 Kings 20); throughout his life he prophesied bad
things to him (see
1 Kings 22.8, and more clearly 2 Chronicles 18.7).Thus
the prophets were more inclined toward one or another kind of revelation
depending upon their di¡ering bodily temperaments.
[
9] The style of prophecy also varied according to the eloquence of the
individual prophet. The prophecies of Ezekiel and of Amos are not ele-
gantly expressed like those of Isaiah and Nahum but written in a rougher
style. If anyone with a good knowledge of Hebrew cares to study this
question more carefully, he may compare certain chapters of the prophets
with each other and will ¢nd a great deal of stylistic di¡erence. Let him
compare for instance chapter
1
of the courtier Isaiah, verses
11^20, with
chapter
5
of the rustic Amos, verses
21^24.
34
Then let him compare the order
and arguments of the prophecy that Jeremiah wrote to Edom (chapter
49)
4
2 Chronicles 34.19^28. The name of the prophetess was Huldah.
On the prophets
31


with the order and arguments of Obadiah. Let him also compare Isaiah
40.19^20 and 44.8 ¡. with Hosea 8.6 and 13.2. And so for the rest; and if all
these passages are duly examined, they will readily show that God has no
particular speaking style, but that he is elegant, concise, severe, rough,
prolix or obscure according to the learning and capability of the prophet.
[
10] Prophetic visions and images, even when referring to the same
thing, varied markedly: the glory of God departing the Temple was
made apparent to Isaiah di¡erently from how it was represented to Ezekiel.
The Rabbis insist that both revelations are exactly the same except that
Ezekiel, as a country fellow, was completely overwhelmed by it and there-
fore narrated it fully in all its circumstantial detail, but they are obviously
making this up ^ unless they had a reliable tradition for it, which I do not
believe. For Isaiah saw seraphim with seven wings each, while Ezekiel saw
beasts with four wings each; Isaiah saw God clothed and seated on a royal
throne, while Ezekiel saw him as a ¢re. Each undoubtedly saw God as he
was accustomed to imagine him.
[
11] Revelations di¡ered, moreover, not only in form but also in clarity.
What was revealed to Zechariah was too obscure for him to be able to
understand it himself without explanation, as is clear from his account of
it, and what was revealed to Daniel could not be understood by the prophet
himself even when it was explained to him. This was not because of the
di⁄culty of what had to be revealed (for these were only human matters,
not beyond the limits of human understanding except in being in the
future), but merely because Daniel’s imagination was not as able to pro-
phesy when he was awake as when he was asleep. This emerges from the
fact that when his visions began, he was so terri¢ed that he almost des-
paired of his capacities. Owing to the debility of his imagination and his
incapacity, things were revealed to him which seemed very obscure to him,
and he could not grasp them even when they were explained to him. Here
we should note that the words that
35
Daniel heard (as we showed above) were
only imaginary; hence it is not surprising that, in his disturbed state at that
time, he imagined all these words in such a confused and obscure manner
that he could make nothing of them afterwards. Those who say that God
did not want to give Daniel a clear revelation seem not to have read the
words of the angel, who explicitly said (see
10.14) that ‘he had come to make
Daniel understand what would happen to his people in the latter days’. It
Theological-Political Treatise
32




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə