Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə29/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   114

command of the law. For this reason the right way of living or the true life
and worship and love of God was more servitude to them than true liberty
and the grace and gift of God. For Moses commanded them to love God and
observe his Law in order to show their gratitude for God’s past blessings
(liberation from Egyptian servitude, etc.); he also thoroughly frightens them
with menaces should they would transgress these laws while at the same
time promising many rewards if they would observe them. Thus he taught
them in the same way as parents teach their children prior to the age of
reason. That is why it is certain that they were ignorant of the excellence of
virtue and true happiness. Jonah considered £eeing from the sight of God,
which seems to show that he too believed that God had given the care of other
lands, beyond Judea, to other powers which he had however established
himself.
[
16] No one in the Old Testament is regarded as speaking about God
more rationally than Solomon, who surpassed all the men of his age in nat-
ural light [i.e. intellectual capacity], and for that reason he also thought
himself to be above the Law (for the Law was delivered only to those who
lack reason and the lessons of natural understanding). He therefore paid
little regard to any of the laws concerning the king which consist principally
of three (see Deut.
17.16^17), and openly violated them. In this, however, he
did wrong and behaved unworthily of a philosopher (that is, by indulging in
luxury). He taught that all the goods of fortune are vain for mortals (see
Ecclesiastes), that men possess nothing which is superior to their intellect,
and can su¡er no greater punishment than stupidity (see Proverbs
16.22).
[
17] But let us return to the prophets, whose di¡ering opinions we have
also undertaken to examine. The rabbis who handed down to us the
books of the prophets (the only ones now extant) found the opinions of
Ezekiel to be so much in con£ict with those of Moses (as we are told in
the treatise Shabbat chapter
1
, folio
13, page 2)
14
that they almost decided
not to admit that book among the canonical books, and would have
completely suppressed it if a certain Hananiah had not taken it upon
himself to explain it. They say he did this with great industry and zeal (as
our source tells us), but how he
42
proceeded is not altogether clear. Did he
write a commentary which happens to have perished, or had he the
14
In the Babylonian Talmud.
On the prophets
39


audacity to change the actual words and statements of Ezekiel and
embellish them at his own discretion? Whatever the case, chapter
16
does not seem to agree with Exodus
34.7 or Jeremiah 32.18, etc.
[
18] Samuel believed that God never repented of any decree he had
once made (see
1 Samuel 15.29), for even when Saul regretted his o¡ence
and was willing to adore God and seek forgiveness from him, Samuel
said that God would not change his decree against him. The opposite
was revealed to Jeremiah (see
18. 8^10), that God does repent of his
decree, whether he has decreed something good or something bad for a
people, if, after giving his sentence, they also change for better or for
worse. Joel however taught that God repents only of something bad (see
2.13.). Finally, from Genesis 4.7 it plainly emerges that a man can over-
come temptations to do wrong and can behave well; for Cain is told so,
though it is evident, from Scripture itself and from Josephus, that Cain
himself never overcame them. The same thing is also clearly indicated by
the chapter of Jeremiah just cited; for he said that God repents of any
decree he has made for men’s good or ill, if they are willing to change
their behaviour and way of life. Paul on the other hand teaches nothing
more plainly than that men have no power over the temptations of the
£esh except by the calling and grace of God alone. See the Epistle to the
Romans
9.10¡., and note that in 3.5 and 6.19, where he attributes justice
to God, he corrects himself by saying that he is speaking there in human
fashion and through the weakness of the £esh.
[
19] Thus what we set out to prove is more than adequately established,
namely that God adapted his revelations to the understanding and
opinions of the prophets, and that the prophets could be ignorant of
matters of purely philosophical reasoning that are not concerned with
charity and how to live; and indeed they really were ignorant in this
respect and held contradictory views. Hence knowledge about natural
and spiritual matters is by no means to be sought from them. We there-
fore conclude that we are not required to believe the prophets in anything
beyond what constitutes the end and substance of revelation; for the
rest, everyone is free to believe as he pleases. For example, the revelation
of Cain only teaches us that God admonished Cain to lead a true life;
that is the only aim and substance
43
of the revelation; it is not intended to
teach freedom of the will or other philosophical matters. Hence,
Theological-Political Treatise
40


although the words and reasonings of that admonition very clearly entail
freedom of the will, we are nevertheless permitted to adopt a contrary
opinion, since those words and reasons were merely adapted to Cain’s
understanding. Similarly, the revelation of Micaiah merely teaches that
God revealed to Micaiah the true outcome of the struggle between Ahab
and Aram, and therefore this is all we are obliged to believe; whatever else
is contained in this revelation we need take no notice of ^ whether con-
cerning the true and false spirit of God and the army of heaven standing
on either side of God, or the other details of the revelation; and thus
everyone is free to make his own judgment of them as seems most
acceptable to his own reason. The same should be said about the rea-
soning by which God reveals to Job his power over all things (if indeed it
is true that they were revealed to Job, and that the author is intending to
narrate a history, and not, as some think, to elaborate his own ideas).
Being accommodated to Job’s understanding and meant merely to con-
vince him, these reasons are not universal ones intended to convince
everybody.
Nor should we think any di¡erently about the reasons with which
Christ convicts the Pharisees of obstinacy and ignorance and exhorts his
disciples to the true life: for clearly, he adapted his arguments to the
beliefs and principles of those individuals. For instance, when he said to
the Pharisees (see Matthew
12.26), ‘and if Satan casts out Satan, he is
divided against himself; how then will his kingdom stand’, he meant only
to sway the Pharisees on the basis of their own notions and not to teach
men that demons exist or that there is some sort of realm of demons.
Equally, when he said to his disciples (Matthew
18.10),‘See that you do
not despise one of these little ones, for I say to you that their angels in
heaven’, etc., the only thing he intends to teach is that they should not be
proud and should not despise anyone, but not the other things con-
tained in his arguments, which he only makes use of to better convince
his disciples of the main point. Precisely the same, ¢nally, should be said
about the arguments and signs of the Apostles about which I need not
speak any further. If I had to enumerate all the passages in Scripture that
are adapted to [the notions of ] particular persons or to the level of their
understanding, and which cannot
44
be defended as divine doctrine without
great prejudice to philosophy, I would stray far from the brevity I aim at.
It su⁄ces therefore to cite just a few, general instances, and leave the
curious reader to ponder other instances for himself.
On the prophets
41




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə