Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə37/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   114

as a ruling, that is, as a convention that gain or loss follows, not from the
necessity and nature of the action done, but only from the pleasure and
absolute command of the prince. Therefore that revelation was a law and
God was a kind of legislator or prince exclusively with respect to Adam,
and only because of the de¢ciency of his knowledge.
It is for the same reason too, namely de¢ciency of knowledge, that the
Ten Commandments were law only for the Hebrews. Since they did not
know the existence of God as an eternal truth, i.e., that God exists and that
God alone is to be adored, they had to understand it as a decree. If God had
spoken to them directly without the use of any physical means, they would
have perceived this same thing not as an edict but as an eternal truth.What
we say about the Israelites and about Adam, must also be said of all the
prophets who issued laws in the name
64
of God: they did not perceive the
decrees of God adequately as eternal truths.
For example, it has even to be said of Moses himself that he grasped,
either through revelation or from principles revealed to him, how the
people of Israel could best be united in a certain part of the world and
form an integrated society and establish a state, and he also saw how that
people might best be compelled to obey. But he did not grasp, nor was it
revealed to him, that this was the best way, nor that the desired aim
would necessarily follow from the common obedience of the people in
such a part of the world. Thus he perceived all these things not as eternal
truths but as precepts and teachings, and prescribed them as decrees of
God. That is why he imagined God as ruler, legislator, king, merciful,
just, etc., despite the fact that all the latter are merely attributes of
human nature and far removed from the divine nature.
[
10] I emphasize that these things must be said only about the prophets
who gave laws in the name of God, but not about Christ. For concerning
Christ, although he too appeared to issue laws in the name of God, one
must see, that he [on the contrary] understood things truly and adequately.
Christ was not so much a prophet as the mouth-piece of God. For, as we
showed in chapter
1
, God revealed certain things to the human race
through the mind of Christ, as he had done previously by means of angels,
i.e., by means of a created voice, visions, etc. So it would be equally irra-
tional to think that God adapted his revelations to Christ’s beliefs as that
he had previously adapted his revelations to the beliefs of angels (i.e. to
the beliefs of a created voice and of visions) in order to communicate his
On the divine law
63


revelations to the prophets. No thought could be more absurd, especially
as Christ was not sent to teach the Jews alone but the whole of humanity. It
was not enough therefore that his mind should be adapted to the beliefs of
the Jews alone; it was necessary rather that his mind should be adapted to
the views and general doctrines of the human race, that is, to principles
that are universal and true. Undoubtedly, since God revealed himself to
Christ or his soul directly and not, as with the prophets, via words and
visions, we can draw no other conclusion than that Christ perceived or
understood real things truly; for something is understood when it is
grasped by the mind alone
65
without words or visions.
Christ therefore understood revealed things truly and adequately. Hence
if he sometimes prescribed them as laws, he did so because of the ignor-
ance and obstinacy of the people. In this matter therefore he took God’s
place and adapted himself to the character of the people; consequently,
although he spoke altogether more clearly than the rest of the prophets, he
nevertheless still taught revealed things obscurely and in many cases by
means of parables, especially when speaking to those to whom it had not
yet been given to understand the kingdom of heaven (see Matthew
13:10,
etc.). To those who were capable of learning about the heavenly mysteries,
he undoubtedly did teach things as eternal truths and not as command-
ments. Hence he freed them from servitude to the law and yet in this way
also con¢rmed and stabilized the law, inscribing it deeply in their hearts.
Paul too seems to indicate as much in certain passages, such as the
Epistle to the Romans,
7.6 and 3.28, although he too prefers not to speak
openly. Rather, as he puts it (
3.5 and 6.19 of the same Epistle), he spoke ‘in
human terms’, expressly admitting this when he calls God ‘just’. Likewise,
it is undoubtedly due to this ‘weakness of the £esh’ that he attributes pity,
grace, anger etc. to God, adapting his words to the character of the com-
mon people or (as he himself puts it at
1 Corinthians 3.1^2) ‘carnal men’.
For at Romans
9.18 he absolutely teaches that God’s anger and mercy
depend not upon men’s works but upon God’s vocation alone, i.e., upon his
will. He also says that no one is justi¢ed by the works of the law but by faith
alone (see Romans
3.28), by which he certainly means nothing other than
full mental assent. Finally he says that no one is blessed unless he has the
mind of Christ in him (see Romans
8.9) whereby, undoubtedly, one may
understand God’s laws as eternal truths.
We conclude therefore that God is described as a legislator or a prince,
and as just, merciful etc., only because of the limited understanding of the
Theological-Political Treatise
64




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə